The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Paracelsus"

Showing 1 - 20 of 90

Your search for posts with tags containing Paracelsus found 90 posts

Filippo Sassetti

 Goa, India 1509Later distinguished as a renowned glassmaker and alchemist, Antonio Neri was born into a patrician household. In the Florentine baptism records, his entry was made on a Thursday, the first of March, 1576. He was born the previous...
From: Conciatore on 16 Nov 2020

Fire, Brimstone and Glass

 The Alchemical Symbol for SulfurBright yellow elemental sulfur or “brimstone” as it was often called, occupied a central place in the cabinets of seventeenth century alchemists. Antonio Neri used it in many of his preparations and specifically...
From: Conciatore on 16 Oct 2020

Alchemist's Assistant

 Spine of volume 3 of Della Casa's notebooks,Biblioteca Nationale Centrale Firenze.At the turn of the seventeenth century, when Priest Antonio Neri was employed in Florence by the Medici prince Don Antonio, he worked closely with another alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 14 Sep 2020

Scraping the Barrel

4th century BCE philosopher Diogenes(supposedly lived in a wine barrel)by Gaetano Gandolfi (1792)To seventeenth century glassmaker Antonio Neri, "tartar" was a well-known byproduct of the winemaking process. If we chill wine or grape juice to below 50...
From: Conciatore on 10 Jul 2020

Dear Friends

The library of the University of Leiden (1610)Christophe Plantin worked here from 1583 to 1585.One day in July of 1601, in Florence, early in the morning, we imagine two men shaking hands, embracing and saying goodbye. Both knew it...
From: Conciatore on 19 Jun 2020

The Paracelsans

Image of ParacelsusIn the late sixteenth century, the writings of an obscure physician started to become very popular around Europe. Born in 1493 with the name of Theophrastus von Hohenheim, "Paracelsus"[1] was the son of a German physician living...
From: Conciatore on 29 May 2020

The Dregs of Alchemy

"The struggle of fixed and volatile" allegorical illustration fromSplendor solis [detail] 16th C.To 17th century Italian glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri, "Dregs" were otherwise known as terra, gruma, immondita, terrestreità and...
From: Conciatore on 27 Apr 2020

Glass, Fire, and Brimstone

The Alchemical Symbol for SulfurBright yellow elemental sulfur or “brimstone” as it was often called, occupied a central place in the cabinets of seventeenth century alchemists. Antonio Neri used it in many of his preparations and specifically...
From: Conciatore on 24 Apr 2020

Filippo Sassetti

Goa, India 1509Later distinguished as a renowned glassmaker and alchemist, Antonio Neri was born into a patrician household. In the Florentine baptism records, his entry was made on a Thursday, the first of March, 1576. He was born the previous evening,...
From: Conciatore on 8 Jan 2020

The Dregs of Alchemy

"The struggle of fixed and volatile" allegorical illustration fromSplendor solis [detail] 16th C.To 17th century Italian glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri, "Dregs" were otherwise known as terra, gruma, immondita, terrestreità and...
From: Conciatore on 18 Dec 2019

Fire, Brimstone, and Glass

The Alchemical Symbol for SulfurBright yellow elemental sulfur or “brimstone” as it was often called, occupied a central place in the cabinets of seventeenth century alchemists. Antonio Neri used it in many of his preparations and specifically...
From: Conciatore on 13 Dec 2019

A Deeper Accomplishment

From Antonio Neri, "Treasure of the World"MS Ferguson 67, f. 22r.For the past four centuries, Antonio Neri has been best known as the author of L'Arte Vetraria, the first printed book solely devoted to the art of glass formulation. It is a work committed...
From: Conciatore on 30 Sep 2019

Alchemist's Assistant

Spine of volume 3 of Della Casa's notebooks,Biblioteca Nationale Centrale Firenze.At the turn of the seventeenth century, when Priest Antonio Neri was employed in Florence by the Medici prince Don Antonio, he worked closely with another alchemist by the...
From: Conciatore on 20 Sep 2019

Scraping the Barrel

4th century BCE philosopher Diogenes(supposedly lived in a wine barrel)by Gaetano Gandolfi (1792)To seventeenth century glassmaker Antonio Neri, "tartar" was a well-known byproduct of the winemaking process. If we chill wine or grape juice to below 50...
From: Conciatore on 16 Sep 2019

A Reluctant Glassmaker

The Sun, Robert Fluddfrom Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19.(alchemical symbol for gold)Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his...
From: Conciatore on 31 Jul 2019

The Paracelsans

Image of ParacelsusIn the late sixteenth century, the writings of an obscure physician started to become very popular around Europe. Born in 1493 with the name of Theophrastus von Hohenheim, "Paracelsus"[1] was the son of a German physician living...
From: Conciatore on 26 Jun 2019

Glass, Fire and Brimstone

The Alchemical Symbol for SulfurBright yellow elemental sulfur or “brimstone” as it was often called, occupied a central place in the cabinets of seventeenth century alchemists. Antonio Neri used it in many of his preparations and specifically...
From: Conciatore on 6 May 2019

The Dregs of Alchemy

"The struggle of fixed and volatile" allegorical illustration fromSplendor solis [detail] 16th C.To 17th century Italian glassmaker and alchemist Antonio Neri, "Dregs" were otherwise known as terra, gruma, immondita, terrestreità and...
From: Conciatore on 3 May 2019

Filippo Sassetti

Goa, India 1509Later distinguished as a renowned glassmaker and alchemist, Antonio Neri was born into a patrician household. In the Florentine baptism records, his entry was made on a Thursday, the first of March, 1576. He was born the previous evening,...
From: Conciatore on 26 Apr 2019

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.