The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Paris"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Paris found 845 posts

Mocking Louis Phillippe in Exile (1848) | Victor Hugo

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

Louis XVI’s Execution: An Eyewitness Account | Leboucher

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

The History of the Bastille (1838) | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following review of Davenport’s History of the Bastille, by G.W.M. Reynolds, appeared in the Monthly Magazine in 1838. The history of the Bastille is too intimately connected with that of the great French Revolution to be passed over without...

On the Democracy of the United States and the Bourgeoisie of France (1838) | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following review of two works published in French, one by the famous Alexis de Tocqueville and the other by M. Michel Chevalier, was written in 1838 by G.W.M. Reynolds. La Democratie en Amerique. Par M. de Tocqueville. Lettres sur l’Amerique...

Suicide of Antonin Moyne (1849) | Victor Hugo

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

CFP: Resilience, Persistence, and Agency

Resilience, Persistence, and AgencyThe American University of Paris, Paris, FranceOn-site and online5th – 7th January 2022 Resilience in the face of adversity for marginalized individuals, persistence in the face of obstacles created by hegemonic power...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 27 Aug 2021

The Early Works of Eugene Sue | G. W. M. Reynolds

Eugene Sue (1804–57) was one of the most popular novelists in nineteenth-century France and he certainly caught the attention of one young aspiring writer who was living in France during the 1830s. This writer was George W.M. Reynolds (1814–79). Although...

9 Thermidor Year II: the best-documented day in the French Revolution?

La Prise de la Bastille (1789), by Jean-Pierre Houël (1735-1813), Bibliothèque nationale de France. At the centre is the arrest of Bernard René Jourdan, marquis de Launay (1740-1789). Was 9 Thermidor Year II (27 July 1794) the most copiously documented...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 19 Aug 2021

Ball at the Hotel-de-Ville (1833) | Victor Hugo

‘Lines Written on a Ball at the Hotel-de-Ville‘ was written by Victor Hugo in 1833 and published in Les Chants du Crepuscule (1835). It was then translated by George W.M. Reynolds and published in Songs of Twilight (1836). Songs of Twilight has recently...

New Edition of Victor Hugo’s Songs of Twilight | Stephen Basdeo and Jessica Elizabeth Thomas

Stephen Basdeo and Jessica Elizabeth Thomas Since the re-branding of this website back in May 2021, its inclusion by Google in its Newsstand app, and this month’s decision by the British Library to officially archive this website’s content...

Bridal Festivity (1832) | Victor Hugo

‘Bridal Festivity’ was written by Victor Hugo in August 1832 and published in his Chants des Crepuscules (1835). This short collection of poetry was then translated by George W.M. Reynolds and published as Songs of Twilight in 1836. The poem itself...

Meeting Eugene Sue in 1832 | G. W. M. Reynolds

Eugene Sue (1804–57) was one of the most popular novelists in early nineteenth-century France, second only, perhaps, to Victor Hugo (who before Les Miserables was known more as a poet than a prose writer). A daguerreotype of Paris in 1838; the city...

Monarchy vs Republic (1848) | François-Vincent Raspail

F. V. Raspail The following lines were written by the French physician François-Vincent Raspail (1794–1878) while he was imprisoned in Château de Vincennes because of his role in the French Revolution of 1848. Titled ‘Many Kinds of Monarchy—One...

Tempest Patron

Giorgione's "Tempest" and the so-called "Discovery of Paris" might have been the two notte that Isabella D' Este sought to acquire on hearing the news of the painter's death in 1510. It is interesting to note that she, like other collectors, was not averse...
From: Giorgione et al... on 17 Jul 2021

July 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “He has got two Sorts of Chairs made by him which are called as neat as any that are made in Boston.” When Joseph P. Goodwin set up shop in Salem in the summer of 1771, he placed...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Jul 2021

France (1838) | G. W. M. Reynolds

George W. M. Reynolds spent his teenage years and early twenties in France working for the Libraire des Etrangers, a bookseller and publisher. While in France he made the acquaintance of several of the country’s famous authors and poets such as Eugene...

The Silence of Slavery in Revolutionary War Art

“His Britannic Majesty shall with all convenient speed, and without causing any Destruction, or carrying away any Negroes or other Property of the American... The post The Silence of Slavery in Revolutionary War Art appeared first on Journal of the...

July 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “As cheap, and equal in goodness to any sold in New York.” Purveyors of goods in Hartford and nearby towns frequently assured prospective customers that they had the same opportunities...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Jul 2021

Victor Hugo’s “Songs of Twilight” (1835) | G. W. M. Reynolds

Victor Hugo wrote a collection of poetry titled Les Chants des Crepuscules in 1835. Upon its first publication in France it received glowing reviews. It also came to the notice of a young English emigrée, George W.M. Reynolds, who in the mid-1830s was...

Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel “The Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Casque’s Lark”

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds UK. Eugene Sue Introduction In 1848 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels wrote the Communist Manifesto. In it, they argued that all history was essentially the history of class struggle....

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.