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Your search for posts with tags containing Paris found 834 posts

Mysteries of the People, Mysteries of the World: Eugene Sue’s Anti- Medievalism and the Revolutions of 1848

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, United Kingdom. The following is the title of a talk that Stephen delivered at the Global Medievalisms conference hosted by the University of Montes Claros, Minas Gerais, Brazil, held on June...

Observations Concerning the Yorktown Surrender Documents

The surrender of the British Army at Yorktown in 1781 was implemented by the three-party Articles of Capitulation (“the Articles”), one of the most... The post Observations Concerning the Yorktown Surrender Documents appeared first on Journal of the...

Remembering the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre

This week marks the 450th anniversary of the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre, which began in Paris on the night of 24 August 1572. Catholic militia and townspeople massacred thousands of Huguenots (French Calvinists) in Paris and provincial towns...

Commemorating the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre

A new memorial garden is being prepared to commemorate the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre of 1572 in Paris. This memorial is sponsored by the Ville de Paris and the Fédération Protestante de France and will be inaugurated on 16 September...

Stravinsky, Nijinsky and the riotous premiere of The Rite of Spring

It should have been a triumph. The premiere of Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring on 29 May 1913, brought together the up-and-coming composer with Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russe company and its star dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, who would choreograph...
From: Mathew Lyons on 20 Jun 2022

The Articles of Confederation and Western Expansion

The Articles of Confederation described the first government of the new United States. As one may imagine from understanding the later debates on the... The post The Articles of Confederation and Western Expansion appeared first on Journal of the American...

“I am a public thing”: Victor Hugo as Political Symbol | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer who specialises in the study of mid-Victorian radical literary cultures, with an emphasis on the works of George W.M. Reynolds (1814–79), Pierce Egan (1814–80), Eugene Sue (1804–57), and Victor Hugo (1802–85)....

May 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “They will sell at as cheap a Raste as any Goods … can be purchased in this Town.” Nathaniel Jacobs advised prospective customers that he stocked a “compleat Assortment...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 May 2022

Charge to the overseers of the hundred of [blank]

Author: Society for Bettering the Condition and Increasing the Comforts of the Poor (Great Britain) Title: Charge to the overseers of the hundred of [blank] in the county of [blank]. Manufacture: [London] : Printed by W. Bulmer and Co. Cleveland-Row...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Apr 2022

The fall of the Knights Templar

Sometime around 1340 Ludolph of Sudheim, a German priest travelling around the Holy Land, encountered two elderly men, one from Burgundy, the other from Toulouse, in the mountains by the Dead Sea. They told him they were Knights Templar, taken prisoner...
From: Mathew Lyons on 14 Apr 2022

Femmes à la cour de France

Tracy Adams has published a review of a collective volume on Femmes à la cour de France, edited by Caroline zum Kolk and Kathleen Wilson. I was pleased to write an essay for this collective volume on noblewomen from the Montmorency family during...

January 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The newest and neatest manner, either in the French or English taste.” When John Burcket, a “Stay and Riding Habit-maker,” arrived in New York, he placed an advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Jan 2022

Jacques Cujas and the Legal Renaissance

This year, French jurists and academics are remembering Jacques Cujas, an important humanist legal scholar who was born 500 years ago in 1522. Jacques Cujas, Musée du Vieux Toulouse, Inv 22.5.1 Humanism is often understood primarily as a literary...

“Mysteries of Lisbon” (1854) by Camilo Branco | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, United Kingdom, whose research focuses on the works of George W.M. Reynolds, Eugene Sue, and Victor Hugo. Introduction One cannot study nineteenth-century popular fiction without encountering...

Chateaubriand Fellowships

The call for applications is now open for the Chateaubriand Fellowships for doctoral research in France during the 2022-2023 academic year. The Chateaubriand Fellowship Program presents the fellowships: “The Chateaubriand Fellowship is a grant offered...

The Two Sieges of Louisbourg: Harbingers of American Discontent

When they heard the news in 1757, some New Englanders smirked. Others grew angry. The British were mounting a major expedition against the powerful... The post The Two Sieges of Louisbourg: Harbingers of American Discontent appeared first on Journal of...

The astronomical librarian 

I’m continuing my look at the French mathematician astronomers of the seventeenth century with some of those, who were both members of Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc’s group of telescopic, astronomical observers, as well as Marin Mersenne’s informal Academia...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Nov 2021

“Something strange and marvellous”: Victor Hugo’s Essay on Walter Scott | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. He specialises in the study of the history of crime, as well as Georgian and Victorian medievalism. Young Victor Hugo in 1829 Introduction In June 1823, the then young and relatively...

Mocking Louis Phillippe in Exile (1848) | Victor Hugo

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

Louis XVI’s Execution: An Eyewitness Account | Leboucher

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

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