The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Paris"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Paris found 857 posts

May 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “They will sell at as cheap a Raste as any Goods … can be purchased in this Town.” Nathaniel Jacobs advised prospective customers that he stocked a “compleat Assortment...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 May 2022

Charge to the overseers of the hundred of [blank]

Author: Society for Bettering the Condition and Increasing the Comforts of the Poor (Great Britain) Title: Charge to the overseers of the hundred of [blank] in the county of [blank]. Manufacture: [London] : Printed by W. Bulmer and Co. Cleveland-Row...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Apr 2022

January 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The newest and neatest manner, either in the French or English taste.” When John Burcket, a “Stay and Riding Habit-maker,” arrived in New York, he placed an advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Jan 2022

Jacques Cujas and the Legal Renaissance

This year, French jurists and academics are remembering Jacques Cujas, an important humanist legal scholar who was born 500 years ago in 1522. Jacques Cujas, Musée du Vieux Toulouse, Inv 22.5.1 Humanism is often understood primarily as a literary...

“Mysteries of Lisbon” (1854) by Camilo Branco | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, United Kingdom, whose research focuses on the works of George W.M. Reynolds, Eugene Sue, and Victor Hugo. Introduction One cannot study nineteenth-century popular fiction without encountering...

Chateaubriand Fellowships

The call for applications is now open for the Chateaubriand Fellowships for doctoral research in France during the 2022-2023 academic year. The Chateaubriand Fellowship Program presents the fellowships: “The Chateaubriand Fellowship is a grant offered...

The Two Sieges of Louisbourg: Harbingers of American Discontent

When they heard the news in 1757, some New Englanders smirked. Others grew angry. The British were mounting a major expedition against the powerful... The post The Two Sieges of Louisbourg: Harbingers of American Discontent appeared first on Journal of...

The astronomical librarian 

I’m continuing my look at the French mathematician astronomers of the seventeenth century with some of those, who were both members of Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc’s group of telescopic, astronomical observers, as well as Marin Mersenne’s informal Academia...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Nov 2021

Mocking Louis Phillippe in Exile (1848) | Victor Hugo

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

Louis XVI’s Execution: An Eyewitness Account | Leboucher

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

The History of the Bastille (1838) | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following review of Davenport’s History of the Bastille, by G.W.M. Reynolds, appeared in the Monthly Magazine in 1838. The history of the Bastille is too intimately connected with that of the great French Revolution to be passed over without...

On the Democracy of the United States and the Bourgeoisie of France (1838) | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following review of two works published in French, one by the famous Alexis de Tocqueville and the other by M. Michel Chevalier, was written in 1838 by G.W.M. Reynolds. La Democratie en Amerique. Par M. de Tocqueville. Lettres sur l’Amerique...

Suicide of Antonin Moyne (1849) | Victor Hugo

After Victor Hugo’s death, and before the publication of his letters (many of which remain unpublished), Paul Maurice published Memoirs of Victor Hugo. This was not chronological autobiography but was, as Maurice remarked, “A sort of haphazard...

CFP: Resilience, Persistence, and Agency

Resilience, Persistence, and AgencyThe American University of Paris, Paris, FranceOn-site and online5th – 7th January 2022 Resilience in the face of adversity for marginalized individuals, persistence in the face of obstacles created by hegemonic power...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 27 Aug 2021

The Early Works of Eugene Sue | G. W. M. Reynolds

Eugene Sue (1804–57) was one of the most popular novelists in nineteenth-century France and he certainly caught the attention of one young aspiring writer who was living in France during the 1830s. This writer was George W.M. Reynolds (1814–79). Although...

9 Thermidor Year II: the best-documented day in the French Revolution?

La Prise de la Bastille (1789), by Jean-Pierre Houël (1735-1813), Bibliothèque nationale de France. At the centre is the arrest of Bernard René Jourdan, marquis de Launay (1740-1789). Was 9 Thermidor Year II (27 July 1794) the most copiously documented...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 19 Aug 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.