The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Parliament found 182 posts

The Later Career of Henry DeBerniere

On 18–19 Apr 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was in the column of British troops that marched to Concord and back. Having visited the town looking for cannon the month before, he was probably one of the main guides for his regimental commander, Lt. Col....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jun 2021

Observations on Several Acts of Parliament

The Townshend Revenue Act of 1767 awoke Americans to the fact that import duties for the purpose of revenue were taxes just as much... The post Observations on Several Acts of Parliament appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Massachusettensis and Novanglus: The Last Great Debate Prior to the American Revolution

When John Adams returned to Massachusetts after the session of the First Continental Congress, he was surprised to find that there was growing opposition... The post Massachusettensis and Novanglus: The Last Great Debate Prior to the American Revolution...

Lies, Personalities and Unparliamentary Expressions

It often puzzles people that accusing someone of lying in parliament seems to be taken more seriously than actually lying – at least that there is some consequence. The member who has made the accusation is called on to withdraw, or rephrase, the...
From: History of Parliament on 29 Apr 2021

A Pyrrhic Victory in the Printers’ Case

In Parliament, 250 years ago this season, there was a big step forward in press freedom to report about how English-speaking governments worked. Back in 1731, Edward Cave launched the Gentleman’s Magazine, which among its features included detailed...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Mar 2021

“What natural right, whether that of smuggling, or of throwing tea overboard?”

The second Boston Tea Party on 7 March 1774 made a smaller splash than the first on the preceding 16 December.There was much less tea involved—fewer than thirty chests as opposed to more than three hundred.The tea was much less valuable. It was...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2021

A New Year’s Gift and the Power to Pardon

Posted by Krista J. Kesselring, 1 January 2021. New Year’s Day traditionally served as an occasion for giving gifts. Some such gifts consisted of words of warning and advice, as tokens of the authors’ best wishes for a good and prosperous...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 1 Jan 2021

Bellamy’s

John Bellamy: mezzotint (1814) by Charles Turner after painting (1808) by J.T. Smith. copyright Trustees of the British Museum (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) license.) Bellamy’s was...
From: History of Parliament on 24 Nov 2020

A New Government in Britain in 177

As the year draws to a close, I’m looking back on some of the notable events of 1770 that I didn’t discuss on their Sestercentennial anniversaries. In January 1770, the Duke of Grafton’s government collapsed in London. The duke had become...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2020

A Critical Review in The Critical Review

In 1764 James Otis, Jr., published The Rights of the British Colonies Asserted and Proved, which based the campaign against Parliament’s new colonial revenue laws on the ideas of natural rights and (though this term wouldn’t be formulated...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Nov 2020

“Considering the Non-importation Agreement to be broke”

By this week in October 1770, 250 years ago, the Boston Whigs knew that the North American non-importation movement had collapsed. As I discussed back here, early that month the Boston Gazette printed a letter from Philadelphia reporting that some of...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Oct 2020

When graduates voted twice

With support for the EU significantly higher among those with a university education, it’s interesting to recall that well into the 20th century graduates could vote twice in UK general elections: once in their local constituencies and again through...
From: Mathew Lyons on 30 Sep 2020

Coventry’s Act and Malicious Injury

By Cassie Watson; posted 29 September 2020. On Tuesday 20 December 1670 the House of Commons adjourned until the New Year, but MPs were unaware that one of their number had been singled out for special attention by members of the king’s household....
From: Legal History Miscellany on 29 Sep 2020

Non-Importation to the End

In the summer of 1770 the Boston Whigs were dealing with the challenge of mixed results. As young printer John Boyle recorded in his chronicle of events on 10 June 1770:An Act of Parliament is received for repealing part of an Act for granting Duties...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Aug 2020

Non-Importation from the Beginning

On 1 Aug 1768, the merchants of Boston agreed to non-importation as a way to pressure London into repealing the Townshend duties. Their agreement stated:The merchants and traders in the town of Boston, having taken into consideration the deplorable situation...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Aug 2020

Parliamentary Privilege and Libel, Part III: Stockdale v. Hansard

This is the third instalment of a series of blogs about how the privilege in parliamentary publication eventually came to be defined in the Parliamentary Papers Act 1840. Part I can be read at Privilege, Libel and the long road to Stockdale v. Hansard,...
From: History of Parliament on 20 Jul 2020

Parliamentary Privilege and Libel, Part II: from Wilkes to 1835

This is a series of three blogs about Parliament and Libel. The first, Privilege, Libel and the long road to Stockdale v. Hansard, Part I: from Strode’s Case to Article IX, dealt with the earliest encounters, in the seventeenth century, between...
From: History of Parliament on 17 Jul 2020

Alarming News from Across the Atlantic

On 21 June 1770, 250 years ago today, the Boston News-Letter reported startling news from London. So startling that Richard Draper added a two-page “Extraordinary” sheet to his newspaper.On Monday the 18th, Capt. James Hall had arrived from...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jun 2020

John Courtenay: “On the red herring scent of American taxation”

This week I learned from the Words for Granted podcast that one of the first documented uses of the phrase “red herring” as a metaphor for a distracting false lead arose from the American Revolution. For centuries “red herring”...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 May 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part 1

Thanks to everyone who puzzled over the Great 1770 Quiz, whether or not you entered answers in the comments!It looks like the competition is down to John and Kathy since they answered both parts. If I try this again I hope to remember the bunch all the...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.