The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Perfume"

Showing 1 - 20 of 29

Your search for posts with tags containing Perfume found 29 posts

Georgian Perfume

Today I thought we would take a look at some Georgian recipes for making perfume, most of them are still feasible to make at home today with some minor adjustments. To perfume clothes Take of oven-dried cloves, cedar and rhubarb wood, once ounce of each...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 Mar 2020

Smelling of Roses in Ancient Rome

By Laurence Totelin as part of the perfume series The painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) had a knack for depicting the — sometimes imaginary — luxurious excesses of the Romans. In The Roses of Heliogabalus, he depicted a banquet hosted...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 May 2019

The civet trade in eighteenth-century London

By Kirsten James as part of the perfume series Civet was an indispensable ingredient for early modern perfumery. This yellow, musky-smelling liquid from the perineal glands of carnivorous civet animals (Viverra civetta) was used in a bewildering range...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 May 2019

Winning the War with Eau de Cologne

By Jess Clark a part of the Perfumes Series In August 1914, Britain declared war on Germany. As many historians compellingly argue, the Great War was a point of major military, political, and socio-cultural disruption. This extended to commercial relationships...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 May 2019

A rose is a rose is a rose… but how does it smell?

By Galina Shyndriayeva as part of the Perfume Series Questions of words and the meanings they convey are critical for poetry and literature, but they are just as important in the poetry of the senses. While chemical knowledge seems to have little to do...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 May 2019

Tales from the Archives: What Was Perfume in the Eighteenth Century?

In the UK, we are getting towards the end of the wonderful bluebell season. In some cooler parts of the country, forest floors are still covered with the delicately-scented flower. I love the earthy smell of bluebells as it blends with the other scents...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 May 2019

Beauty and Global Trade in Margaret Baker’s Book

This is the second part of a two-part post by a former student of mine, who also happens to be an author of popular history.  Karen has written on fun things like fashion and Essex Girls in history. Her original, longer post is taken from a digital...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Jun 2018

Making and Consuming Perfume in Eighteenth-Century England

Dr William Tullett asks why manuscript recipes for perfumes were on the decline in the eighteenth century, and investigates the role of the senses in perfume making. A survey of the vast collection in the Wellcome library suggests that the presence...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Apr 2018

Fragrant Protection: Saffron in Medieval China

By Yan Liu In 647, an emissary from Gapi, a kingdom in northern India, presented a plant called “yu gold aromatic” (yu jin xiang) to the court of Tang (618-907). The foreign herb flowered in the ninth month of the year, with the shape...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Apr 2018

Scent of a Queen

While I was looking for spring wine concoctions in A Queen’s Delight the other day I came across a recipe for “Queen Elizabeths Perfume”: Take eight spoonfuls of Compound water, the weight of two pence in fine powder of Sugar, and boil...
From: streets of salem on 2 May 2016

Many a good razor has been cast aside as useless…

At foot of the first page: “Sold by the proprietor, G. Packwood, 16, Gracechurch-street London.” On the verso: “Vended in London by the following perfumers” and “Vended in the country by the following perfumers.” ...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 5 Oct 2015

A Perfumed Recipe on the Early Modern Stage (Part 1)

By Colleen Kennedy This is the first part of a two-part reading of the pomander recipe depicted in Thomas Tomkis’ allegorical Jacobean comedy, Lingua: or, the Combat of the Tongue and the Five Senses for Superiority (1607)[1]. Below, I consider how...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Dec 2014

What Was Perfume in the Eighteenth Century?

Kirsten James Perfume as we know it is a sweet smelling liquid made from natural and synthetic aromatic ingredients. Yet, far from being a mere scent, perfume is also a fashion accessory, tool of self-definition, and convenient gift. Perfumes are …...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Dec 2014

Happy Bloody Halloween

Happy Bloody Halloween by madame-guillotine featuring red jewelry Falconwright leather purse, £61 / Topshop red jewelry, £9.38 / What A Mess Scoop Skater Dress › Black Milk Clothing, £53 / JAMILA | Womens Boots | Official Dr Martens Store –...
From: Madame Guillotine on 8 Oct 2014

Making Scents in the Victorian Home

By Jessica P. Clark In 1864, London perfumer Eugène Rimmel (of modern Rimmel Cosmetics fame) published The Book of Perfumes. Compiled from a series of articles he wrote for science-minded readers of The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine, the book charted...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Aug 2014

Perfume House + Fleuriste capture the fragrance of Marie Antoinette's gardens

New York City based perfumers Fabrice Penot and Edouard Roschi of Le Labo have teamed up with florist Thierry Boutemy and perfumer Barnabé Fillion to create a new fragrance reminiscent of Marie Antoinette's gardens. Penot and Roschi have been fans...

Robert Herrick’s penchant for (feminine) almonds

By Colleen Kennedy  THE BRIDE-CAKE. by Robert Herrick THIS day, my Julia, thou must make For Mistress Bride the wedding-cake : Knead but the dough, and it will be To paste of almonds turn’d by thee : Or kiss it … Continue reading →
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Nov 2013

Garlic and fertility testing in the Greek world

By Laurence Totelin In my last blog post, I discussed some ancient gender tests. This month, I turn to Greek fertility tests. In the Greek world, women only entered full womanhood upon conception and delivery of a child, preferably a … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Nov 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.