The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Peter Oliver"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Peter Oliver found 28 posts

“Upon his Interment a large Mob attended”

As I described yesterday, the funeral of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver on 8 Mar 1774 did not go smoothly. Some of Oliver’s close friends and relatives, including his brother, Chief Justice Peter Oliver (shown here), and their in-law, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson,...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2021

A Funeral Procession for Andrew Oliver

I started this month reviewing the events of early March 1774: the return of the Massachusetts Spy, the death of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver (shown here), John Hancock’s Massacre oration, and the second Boston Tea Party.That wasn’t all. Lt. Gov....
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Mar 2021

“A determination to discourage a faithful Servant of the Crown”

For acting governor Thomas Hutchinson, the dispute between his Council and the provincial secretary Andrew Oliver was yet one more headache in 1770. On 28 September, Hutchinson told the departed but still official governor, Sir Francis Bernard: “[Royall]...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Dec 2020

“See the Junto Cheat the deluded People with the Shew of Liberty”

As Thomas Hutchinson expected, no one claimed the province’s £100 reward for information on who left a handbill on the Town House lambasting the judges in the Boston Massacre trials. However, the friends of the royal government still had a...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Dec 2020

Sentenced and Punished for the Boston Massacre

The 17 Dec 1770 Boston Gazette reported on the third trial for the Boston Massacre by naming all the defendants and concluding, “After a few Hours Trial, they were acquitted.”Unlike that same day’s Boston Evening-Post, the Gazette said...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Dec 2020

Convicted for the Boston Massacre

After Robert Treat Paine finished his closing argument in the second Boston Massacre trial on 5 Dec 1770, the justices delivered their charges to the jury.In modern trials, judges usually confine their remarks to clarifying points of law. In the eighteenth...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Dec 2020

“Complete victory obtaind over the knaves & foolish villains of Boston”

On 31 Oct 1770, the day after he was acquitted of murder, Capt. Thomas Preston wrote a letter from Castle William to Gen. Thomas Gage in New York.Soon after being arrested, Preston had written a letter to Edes and Gill’s Boston Gazette praising...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Nov 2020

“Those Letters were not the writings he meant”

When William Story told Thomas Hutchinson in the summer of 1772 that he’d seen some problematic “writings” by the governor, he probably didn’t couch that in the form of a threat.Rather, Story likely used the language of the patronage...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Oct 2020

“It was a very unfortunate time to preach a sermon”

The Rev. Jonathan Mayhew insisted that, even though his sermon on 25 Sept 1765 decried the Stamp Act, Bostonians couldn’t have taken that as encouragement to riot against royal officials.But crowds did riot the following night, and in particular...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2020

“Brethren, ye have been called unto liberty”

In 1765, 25 August was a Sunday, so the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew preached a sermon at the West Meetinghouse in Boston. Mayhew was one of the town’s most radical ministers in two ways:Though a strong Congregationalist, he leaned theologically toward...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Aug 2020

“Jury went out after noon and did not agree all night”

On 20 Apr 1770, Benjamin Lynde, acting chief justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court, wrote in his diary:Fair. Richardson and Wilmot’s tryal, begun morn. and Jury went out after noon and did not agree all night.As recounted yesterday, Lynde...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Apr 2020

The Trial of Ebenezer Richardson

On 20 Apr 1770, 250 years ago today, Ebenezer Richardson went on trial for the killing of young Christopher Seider.This was just short of two months after the fatal confrontation at Richardson’s house in the North End, but for the Boston Whigs that...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Apr 2020

“Liberated upon each of them giving bail”

Back on 27 March, I described how a Suffolk County grand jury indicted four civilians for murder in the Boston Massacre.As acting governor Thomas Hutchinson wrote, those four men had been “committed to close prison, where they lay about a fortnight,”...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Apr 2020

The Devil and George Gailer

Here’s a final note on the riotous events of 28 Oct 1769—the merchants’ confrontation with printer John Mein and the tarring and feathering of sailor George Gailer. In 2011 Dr. Caitlin G. D. Hopkins shared a passage from a letter by...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Nov 2019

“Carting the feather’d Informer thro’ the principal Streets in Town”

John Mein going under cover didn’t end the violence in Boston on Saturday, 28 Oct 1769. In fact, that date saw the town’s first tarring and feathering. Though Boston became notorious in the British Empire for tar-and-feathers attacks in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Oct 2019

“All the Seals have been taken out of the Council Chamber”

Hace you seen the last royal seal of Massachusetts?At left is a picture of the impression the seal made. It shows the royal arms of Great Britain, with the lion and unicorn fighting for a crown, within a motto denoting the reign of George III.As the Massachusetts...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jul 2017

How “Mohawk” Conquered “Narragansett” in Reports of the Boston Tea Party

The Boston Post-Boy’s parenthetical mention on 20 Dec 1773 that the men who destroyed the tea in Boston harbor were “dressed like Mohawks or Indians” wasn’t the first time American Whigs had specifically invoked the Mohawk people...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Dec 2016

The Mystery of Poem XXIX

Yesterday I described the 1761 collection of poems titled Pietas et Gratulatio, designed to show off the learning of Harvard College in praise to King George III. Although the college announced a competition for students and recent graduates, surviving...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Mar 2016

“As regular as a military Corps”

As I read the accounts of anti-Stamp Act demonstrations from late 1765, I’ve been struck by their emphasis on the crowd’s military discipline. After the 1 November procession, Gov. Francis Bernard reported to London: “[Ebenezer] MackIntosh...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Nov 2015

August Saturdays at the Paul Revere House

The Paul Revere House in Boston’s North End is offering programs every Saturday afternoon this month.8 August at 1:00, 1:45 & 2:30 P.M.A Loyalist Perspective on the Revolution Hear a first-hand account of the abuses that Loyalists suffered at...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Aug 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.