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Search Results for "Piracy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Piracy found 62 posts

This Week on Dispatches: Andrew Zellers-Frederick on the Impeachment of Senator William Blount, the First in American History

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and JAR contributor Andrew Zellers-Frederick on the impeachment of Senator William Blount of Tennessee, the... The post This Week on Dispatches: Andrew Zellers-Frederick on the Impeachment...

Pierre Bayle and the QAnon “Skeptics”

Print made by James Gillray, 1757–1815, British, Published by Hannah Humphrey, ca. 1745–1818, British, The Theatrical Bubble: Being a New Specimen of the Astonishing Powers of the Great Politico-Punchinello, in the art of Dramatic Puffing,...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 7 Feb 2021

4 Cautionary Tales from the French Revolution for Today

This paper is an outgrowth of a talk given at the Newberry library on January 15, 2021. By Christine Adams Many Americans may be tempted to interpret Biden’s inauguration as the opening of a new chapter, and in many ways it is, but we must...
From: Age of Revolutions on 22 Jan 2021

“They Chase Specters”: The Irrational, the Political, and Fear of Elections in Colonial Pennsylvania

By J. L. Tomlin Surveying the situation on the eve of Pennsylvania’s 1726 General Assembly elections, Quaker James Logan realized he’d come to despise the colony’s democratic process. To him, its participants were seemingly “vile...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Dec 2020

Pirates of the American Revolution in the Chesapeake Bay: Joseph Wheland Jr. and the Loyalist Picaroons

By Jamie L. H. Goodall The American Revolution is often viewed through a loyalist vs. rebel/revolutionary lens. On the one hand, there were the proud, patriotic American colonists, and on the other hand an oppressive and cruel king. Among the Americans...
From: Age of Revolutions on 24 Aug 2020

The First Piracy. Part 5. Bibliographical Concerns

This is the fifth and final essay on the first piracy of Hoyle's Whist. I have identified lots of variants in the surviving 42 copies. Here I ask the bibliographical questions--how many editions, issues, and states do these copies represent? The bible...
From: Edmond Hoyle, Gent. on 13 Apr 2020

The First Piracy. Part 4. Analysis

Part three of this series looked at gathering A of the first piracy of Hoyle's Whist. I described differences in the half-title, the title, and the advertisement. It would be useful for you to have that essay open in another window alongside this to be...
From: Edmond Hoyle, Gent. on 8 Apr 2020

The First Piracy. Part 3: Variants in Gathering A

From parts one and two, the story so far:The first piracy of Hoyle's Whist is an octavo gathered in fours, and collates 8o: [A]4 χ2 B-M4.The printing would have started with the B gathering and continued through to M. Gatherings A and χ would...
From: Edmond Hoyle, Gent. on 6 Apr 2020

The First Piracy. Part 2. Variants

A quick recap from the previous essay, "The First Piracy. Part 1. Overview and Structure".The book was printed by the piratical James Mechell.  It is an octavo gathered in fours, collating 8o: [A]4 χ2 B-M4.43 copies survive, by far the largest...
From: Edmond Hoyle, Gent. on 3 Apr 2020

The First Piracy. Part 1. Overview and Structure

(Portions of this essay appeared in a previous post.)I've said a lot about the first piracy of Hoyle's A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist in this blog, in a published article, and in a talk I have given two or three times. There remains much to say...
From: Edmond Hoyle, Gent. on 1 Apr 2020

This Week on Dispatches: David Head on the Run-up to the Newburgh Conspiracy

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews author and University of Central Florida historian David Head on his recent article about events leading up... The post This Week on Dispatches: David Head on the Run-up to the Newburgh...

A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution

A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution by David Head (New York: Pegasus Books, 2019)... The post A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American...

The Officers’ Spirited Memorial: A Prelude to the Newburgh Conspiracy

The officers of the Continental Army were sullen. It was December 1782, and they were stationed in and around Newburgh, New York, and neighboring... The post The Officers’ Spirited Memorial: A Prelude to the Newburgh Conspiracy appeared first on...

Uplifting Moments in American Revolution History

For every historian, there’s an event that makes them feel good every time they read about it. We asked our contributors: What event from... The post Uplifting Moments in American Revolution History appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

This Week on Dispatches: Richard Werther and Lambert Wickes, Continental Navy Captain

In this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer and JAR contributor Richard J. Werther discuss the life of Captain Lambert Wickes, the differences between “piracy” and... The post This Week on Dispatches: Richard Werther and Lambert...

The First Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington

The First Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington by Brad Meltzer and Josh Mensch (Flatiron Books, 2019). On June 28, 1776—only days before... The post The First Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington appeared first...

The Call of Nature

Sailors of the eighteenth century were just as human as the rest of us. That means they had to sleep, eat, drink, and relieve themselves.Given both the personal and mundane nature of the subject, it isn't surprising that so few people wrote about how...
From: British Tars, 1740-1790 on 10 Dec 2018

A Second Bonaparte: Searching for the Character of Alexander Hamilton

Thomas Jefferson, that American Sphinx,[1] is perhaps Alexander Hamilton’s only rival within the high pantheon of the founding generation for enigma. Hamilton’s character recalls... The post A Second Bonaparte: Searching for the Character...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.