The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Plants"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Plants found 162 posts

A Taste of Tamarind

By Allison Fulton, Amara Santiesteban Serrano, and Jeannette Schollaert Sturdy Contradictions The grand and imposing hard-wood tree Tamarindus indica, commonly known as the tamarind tree, has long been a contradictory plant: it is at once a place of...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 May 2022

Cassava: From Toxic Tuber to Food Staple

By Christina Emery, Rachel Hirsch, and Melinda Susanto When eaten raw, cassava is likely to leave a bitter taste in one’s mouth. Worse still, the unprocessed plant, containing high levels of cyanide, is poisonous to humans and can paralyze when eaten....
From: The Recipes Project on 19 May 2022

The Power of Peony

By Ashley Buchanan The Secret Ingredient In 1735, a Viennese baroness wrote to the last Medici princess, Anna Maria Luisa de Medici (1669—1743), to thank her for sending a miraculous infant convulsion powder. Anna Maria Luisa’s recipe for infant convulsion...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 May 2022

Cacao: Indigenous Network to Global Commodity

By Rebecca Friedel A Coveted Tree  Theobroma cacao is a coveted tree known as the source of the globally celebrated chocolate, initially known as xocolatl in Nahuatl. The fruits of cacao are a variety of berry known as drupes. Drupes grow from pollinated...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 May 2022

Introduction to the Plant Humanities

By Julia Fine Recipes, as the tagline of this project suggests, feature in many facets of daily life, from food to science, magic to medicine. At the basis of many (if not most) of these recipes are plants: we’ve learned here how chiles were used to...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 May 2022

One Hundred Delightful Tastes of Tofu: How Doable Was an Early Modern Japanese Recipe?

By Sora (Skye) Osuka Tofu Hyakuchin (豆腐百珍, One Hundred Delightful Tastes of Tofu Recipes), originally published in 1782, is often considered the first cookbook that only focuses on one ingredient and the beginning of the Hyakuchin-mono (百珍物,...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Apr 2022

‘Dwale’: A Medieval Sleeping Drug in a Seventeenth-Century Receipt Book

Elizabeth K. Hunter As part of my research into early modern sleep disorders, I have been examining the wide variety of sleep remedies available in England at the time.  Browsing through the manuscript receipt collections at the Wellcome Library in London,...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Jan 2022

Cha (ឆា):The Remarkable Role of Stir-Fries in Khmer Gastronomy and Healing

By Ashley Thuthao Keng Dam Within the grand, yet nebulous universe of what food and culture writers deem as “Asian” cooking and gastronomy, there is a deep love and affinity for the stir-fry. In a hot oily pan, various combinations of vegetables and...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Nov 2021

“Very good are the words of the wise”: Plagues and Remedies of the Colonial Maya

By R.A. Kashanipour Early Spanish settlers, administrators, and chroniclers frequently lamented how Old World diseases ravaged native communities in the New World. The famed Dominican Bartolomé de Las Casas described the ferocity of the first epidemics:...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Oct 2021

The Journey of the Hairy Fruit

By Semine Long-Callesen and Nancy Valladares  In winter of 2020, we travelled to Honduras to visit Nancy’s family. Driving across the country from south to north and along the west coast, we passed an endless landscape of banana and coffee plantations....
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Jul 2021

Chinese American Herbal Medicine: A History of Importation and Improvisation

By Tamara Venit Shelton “Chinese herbalists imported everything from China.” This is what I consistently heard from herbalists I interviewed when writing Herbs and Roots: A History of Chinese Doctors in the American Medical Marketplace. As far as...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Jul 2021

Remembering Terry Turner (1929-2019): Pharmaceutical History Collector Extraordinaire

By Laurence Totelin, with input from Briony Hudson A few years ago, my colleagues Heather Trickey (social sciences), Julia Sanders (midwifery) and I decided to put together a small exhibition on the history of infant feeding, with a focus on Wales where...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Jun 2021

Cherries Galore in a Cesspit

By Merit Hondelink As an archaeobotanist, an archaeologist specialised in studying plant remains found in archaeological excavations, I aim to reconstruct and interpret the relationships between humans and plants in the past. Archaeological plant remains,...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 May 2021

A Roman Vegetarian Substitute for Fish Sauce

By Edith Evans Roman cookery has been one of my research interests since the 1980s; I’ve accumulated a large repertoire of ancient recipes and usually do at least one live demonstration a year.  Most of the recipes include garum or liquamen – fish...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 May 2021

The Curing Chocolate of Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma of 1631

By R.A. Kashanipour “The number of people drink who chocolate is vast,” wrote the seventeenth century Spaniard, Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma, “not only in the Indies, where the beverage originated, but also in Spain, Italy and Flanders,...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Apr 2021

Garcinia Longings

By Rini Barman My digestive tract goes for a toss once seasons are about to change in Assam. I am speaking of that eerie intermediary period when the winds, too, aren’t very sure which direction to follow. With rising temperatures and global warming...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Mar 2021

Tales from the Archives: Was There a Recipe for Korean Ginseng?

By Daniel Trambaiolo As all of us continue to watch the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, and wait with cautious optimism for a time when we can heal and recover, I’d like to take a moment to revisit another medical breakthrough that required patience of...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Dec 2020

Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r."Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 23 Sep 2020

Revisiting Jennifer Sherman Roberts’ Little Shop of Horrors, Early Modern Style

Today, I wanted to visit the work of a long-time contributor and dear friend of the Recipes Project – Jennifer Sherman Roberts. Jen has authored more than a dozen wonderful posts on the blog covering topics such as “The CIA’s Secret...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Jul 2020

Revisiting Marieke Hendriksen’s Indigo or no indigo?

Today we revisit a post written in pre-Covid-19 times, when borders were open, planes were flying and we used to travel the world. In this post from 2018, Marieke Hendriksen recounts how her holiday in Laos offered opportunities to learn more about indigo...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Jul 2020

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