The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Plants"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Plants found 138 posts

Revisiting Lisa Smith’s Coffee: A Remedy Against the Plague

Editor’s note: Today, we revisit a post by our editor Lisa Smith on the use of coffee as an eighteenth century cure-all against smallpox and the plague. The botanist Richard Bradley claimed that coffee would be effective in treating such diseases...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 May 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part III

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Jan 2020

Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r."Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 20 Dec 2019

Visualizing the Plate: Reading Modernist Mexican Cuisine Through Colonial Botany

Lesley A. Wolff The eighteenth century’s Age of Enlightenment signaled an era of standardization for the visual and textual colonial taxonomies of resources in the Americas. These illustrations were intended for export to European elites, many of...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Dec 2019

Soledad Acosta de Samper: Botany, Food, and Gender in 19th Century South America

Vanesa Miseres Soledad Acosta de Samper (1833-1913) was one of the most renowned South American writers of the 19th century and critical to the construction of gendered notions of national identity in South America.  She worked as a translator, journalist,...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Dec 2019

Very Frugal Ways to Cook Rice—Famine Prevention and Common Knowledge in Edo Japan

By Joshua Schlachet If you’ve browsed The Recipes Project in the past several weeks, you may have raised an eyebrow at the unfamiliar black and white squiggles that decorate the top of our page (written, by the way, in a cursive form of premodern...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Oct 2019

Mesquite Atole – Kúi Wihog

By Jacqueline Soule Atole is a drink popular throughout Mexico, Central America, and the American Southwest. Atole is a usually a warm drink, generally based on corn, frequently sweetened somehow, and often prepared with cinnamon as well. Atole has countless...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Oct 2019

Exploring Historical Blacks: The Burgundian Black Collaboratory

By Paula Hohti Here at The Recipes Project, we are proud to have the opportunity to, from time to time, amplify the incredible collaborative projects of our contributors by cross-posting their work in their own words. This is the first entry in a series...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Oct 2019

Tales from the Archives — A Plant for the End of the World

As I sift through materials for my own research on manuals and strategies for famine prevention, I’ve had to spend a lot of time thinking about plants. The near-obsession with the healing properties of plants pervades premodern East Asia, not just...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Oct 2019

Worst Housewarming Ever

By Lisa Smith The Editorial Team debated whether or not to join the digital #ClimateStrike. The team was divided: should we make a political stand at all? In the end, we compromised. Rather than shut down the site temporarily, we decided to have a banner...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Sep 2019

From the Garden

It is often said that seventeenth-century men and women used plants that could be found in the garden or the hedgerow to make their own medicines. This sometimes provides a distorted picture of how easy it was to produce medicines in the kitchen at this...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 29 Aug 2019

Smelling of Roses in Ancient Rome

By Laurence Totelin as part of the perfume series The painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) had a knack for depicting the — sometimes imaginary — luxurious excesses of the Romans. In The Roses of Heliogabalus, he depicted a banquet hosted...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 May 2019

Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r."Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 10 May 2019

A rose is a rose is a rose… but how does it smell?

By Galina Shyndriayeva as part of the Perfume Series Questions of words and the meanings they convey are critical for poetry and literature, but they are just as important in the poetry of the senses. While chemical knowledge seems to have little to do...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 May 2019

Tales from the Archives: What Was Perfume in the Eighteenth Century?

In the UK, we are getting towards the end of the wonderful bluebell season. In some cooler parts of the country, forest floors are still covered with the delicately-scented flower. I love the earthy smell of bluebells as it blends with the other scents...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 May 2019

All a growing, a growing, heres flowers for your gardens

“A handsome young man sells pot-plants to a pretty young woman who stands on a door-step (left); a little girl beside her points eagerly to the flowers. He has a two-wheeled cart drawn by an ass; in it are small shrubs in large pots; two pots of...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 2 Apr 2019

Battlefield Plants and their Uses

In 2015 we wrote a blog post describing the uses for certain plants found on Culloden Battlefield, with particular focus on their medicinal properties; here are four more plants that can be seen at Culloden, along with information detailing what they...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 2 Feb 2019

Thanksgiving with Galen and Apicius

By Sean Coughlin For Thanksgiving, I thought I’d come up with a new English translation of a seasonal recipe from the Roman cook-book of Apicius. It comes from the third book of De re coquinaria. The Latin is cucurbitas cum gallina. In Joseph Vehling’s...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Nov 2018

Wilderness Living. Therapeutic Uses & Other Benefits and Claims of Agave Americana/Century Plant.

Image credit & copyright Author.This plant can also be found growing wild in Australia.The inner core of the flower stem makes excellent tinder. More Info Here:  https://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/agave-americana.htmlhttps://basmati.com/2017/04/25/10-uses-agave-plant-you-probably-didnt-know
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 4 Aug 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.