The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Plays"

Showing 1 - 20 of 268

Your search for posts with tags containing Plays found 268 posts

“The Life and Death of Jacke Straw” (1593)

By Stephen Basdeo The following is an excerpt from my book: The Life and Legend of a Rebel Leader: Wat Tyler (2018). It is available to buy from the publisher here: Link. Wat Tyler’s rebellion in 1381 was the first large-scale uprising of the common...

Live streaming Shakespeare during lockdown

Schaubuehne Theatre Hamlet It’s spring 2020 and many of us are confined to home in social isolation during the Coronavirus pandemic. With theatres, museums, galleries and cinemas closed, cultural organisations have been quick to announce initiatives...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 31 Mar 2020

Pass Ye Remote: A Quest for Early Modern Entertainment Through Online Learning Resources

Welcome to Elizabethan England via the digital world! We’re lucky to have a range of exciting and innovative online resources at our disposal that make it possible to explore the entertainment and cultural activities of early modern England through...
From: Before Shakespeare on 16 Mar 2020

Exhibition: “La otra Corte” in the Palacio Real de Madrid, Dec ’19-March ’

La otra Corte. Mujeres de la Casa de Austria en los monasterios reales de Las Descalzas y La Encarnación – Palacio Real de Madrid, December 5 2019-March 2020.
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 4 Dec 2019

Exhibition & Book: Berruguete

“Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain.” National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 13, 2019-February 17, 2020. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas, March 29-July 26, 2020. Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain,...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 3 Dec 2019

Screening: “The Winter’s Tale” Branagh Theatre Live – encore

[Info from the ODEON Cinemas website.] Due to phenomenal demand, The Winter’s Tale, Shakespeare’s timeless tragicomedy of obsession and redemption, returns to cinemas this festive season. This beautifully reimagined production,co-directed...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 30 Nov 2019

Biography - Leading Ladies in Early American Theater Troupes

.Actresses in the 18th-century were generally not regarded with the same respect that male actors were. The stage was not a woman's world, as it was said to be better suited for men. On one hand, women were looked down upon if they acted, as it was not...
From: 18th-century American Women on 25 Nov 2019

Greco Exhibition: Grand Palais, Oct 16 2019-Feb 10,

“Greco,” Grand Palais, Paris, Galerie sud-est, October 16, 2019-February 10, 2020.
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 3 Oct 2019

Exhibition, Review, & Catalogue: Bartolomé Bermejo

Exhibition: “Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance,” The National Gallery, 12 June-29 Septbmer 2019. Review: Isabelle Kent in Apollo June 25, 2019. Exhibition catalog: Letizia Treves; with contributions by Paul Ackroyd,...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 12 Aug 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS: Changing Histories - Rethinking the Early Modern History Play

King’s College London, hosted by the London Shakespeare Centre, 4th–5th July 2019Confirmed plenary speakers: Tracey Hill (Bath Spa University); Paulina Kewes (University of Oxford); and Emma Smith (University of Oxford)CFP deadline: 31...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 4 Jul 2019

Gelber Reviews Carlos III Exhibitions

Two years late but still worth knowing about: David Gelber, “The light and shade of Carlos III of Spain,” Apollo, January 18, 2017
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 1 May 2019

Tudor Drama in Modern Performance

How might modern performance histories and theatrical experiments advance research on Tudor plays? On Friday 1stMarch at Newcastle University, an event on ‘Tudor Plays in Performance’ will address this question. Professor Jessica Winston will...
From: Before Shakespeare on 12 Feb 2019

Bad quarto of Hamlet, 1603, also known as the first quarto of Hamlet

The earliest surviving print version of Hamlet is on display on the British Library website, Click here to find out what a “bad” quarto is.

1755 Marylanders read of a new London school theater for Christmas Plays

1733 The Laughing Audience from an etching by William Hogarth (1697-1764) detail adapted by Edward Matthew Ward (1816-1879)British American colonists were at least aware of the English tradition of staging plays at Christmas. In 1755, the Maryland Gazette...
From: 18th-century American Women on 12 Dec 2018

Minding the Gaps of Early Modern Drama

Was the Interregnum a “dramatic dead zone”?  Heidi Craig explores Drama in the years between the Civil War and the Restoration (1642-1660).  Go here for more (and have a look at the Lost Plays Database while you’re there).

William Davenant’s Macbeth: Shakespeare “Improved” at the Folger

Kate Eastwood Norris as Lady Macbeth in the present Folger production Friends and readers, I much enjoyed, indeed was drawn to attend minutely to the Folger Shakespeare William Davenant’s 1673 version of Shakespeare’s Macbeth this afternoon....
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 16 Sep 2018

10 books that influenced him in his life? Wind in the Willows to Proust

John Malkovich as the Le Baron du Charlus and Vincent Perez as Morel (Time Regained,1999) Friends and readers, For the last day I thought I would tell of Jim’s books, his favorites and those (insofar as I can tell) that influenced him as a boy,...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 23 Jul 2018

Donmar’s all-female Shakespeare Trilogy comes to TV

I’ve written a number of blog posts, over several years, about Phyllida Lloyd’s all-female Shakespeare trilogy that began at the Donmar Warehouse theatre in London. One’s here, and here’s another. It wasn’t an obvious trilogy,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 17 Jun 2018

Rehabilitating Shakespeare’s “she-wolf of France”, Margaret of Anjou

  Margaret of Anjou For many years attempts have been made to establish that Richard III was not the out and out villain that Shakespeare presents to us, a difficult task since Richard III is one of his most compelling characters in a highly successful...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 31 May 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.