The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Police"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Police found 30 posts

Victorian Crime News: Evidence Which Cannot Err or Deceive?

By Cassie Watson; posted 28 March 2021. Our ability to research the history of crime is expanding at a remarkable rate, as more and more legal documents and historic newspapers are digitised. Despite paywalls and the shortcomings associated with optical...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 28 Mar 2021

Highway Robbery at Highbury: The Murder of PC Daly in 184

By Cassie Watson; posted 30 December 2020. English legal records include information about the service experiences of thousands of law officers of all ranks, from eighteenth-century excisemen and parish constables to Victorian beat constables and Edwardian...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 30 Dec 2020

Success/Failure? Louis Riel and the History of Policing Canada

Max Hamon The toppling of the statue of John A. Macdonald during a protest against policing in downtown Montreal last month was part of a global revolution in public opinion.[1] As Peter Gossage remarked, “this is no longer Macdonald’s Canada.”...
From: Borealia on 21 Sep 2020

Henry Hetherington Exposes Police Brutality in 1831

By Stephen Basdeo I’m starting a new series on this site: ‘Henry Hetherington Reports’. I recently got hold, very cheaply, four volumes of Hetherington’s Poor Man’s Guardian and I was struck at how many instances of police...

Is A Bow And Arrow Illegal In NSW - The Loose Cannon By Simon Munslow | 5 May

I have written previously about Weapons Prohibition Act 1996, and unfair results that can arise from its all-encompassing wording, which makes even the submarine pressure hull in the park at Holbrook, and WW1 trench art, prohibited weapons....
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 7 May 2020

George Orwell’s Time as a Policeman in British India

By Angelo Calfo George Orwell’s ‘Shooting an Elephant’, first published in New Writing in 1936, is a recollection in first person of an experience that George Orwell had while serving as a policemanin Burma, British India (present day...

Perverts in Rubber Suits

By Stephen Basdeo Such a man begins to commit actual murder from the first moment that he begins to indulge his sadistic day dreams, from the instant that he deviates from his normal routine, and begins to buy sadistic novelettes, or seek out a prostitute...

Muzzle-Loading Guns, rifles & pistols. Police Seizure Abuse - The Loose Cannon.

Although I once defied the odds and got nought out of thirty in an open book multiple choice Chemistry test, leading to me studying law and not an agricultural science, Newton’s third law ‘for every reaction there is an equal and opposite...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 23 May 2019

Thoughts for the week By Ron Owen of Owen Guns. 15th May 2019

Thoughts For The Week.“What you do in your lifetime will echo down through eternity”,Marcus Aurelius.Is it About Suppression?On the 18th of May we have choices to make in our Federal Election. There are two choices, two examples of people...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 14 May 2019

Peeling a Charley

“Peel kicks a lean old watchman behind, and drags from his shoulders his patched and tattered coat. Just behind him (right) is a big bonfire in which a watch-box and battered lanterns are blazing; beside it lie more lanterns, a rattle, and staves....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Apr 2019

Digital Forensics in the House of Lords: six themes relevant to historians (Part Two)

This post was originally published at the Software Sustainability Institute blog. In Part One of this blog series on the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee  inquiry into forensic science, I discussed oral evidence pertaining to digital...
From: cradledincaricature on 5 Apr 2019

Digital Forensics in the House of Lords: six themes relevant to historians (Part One)

This post was originally published at the Software Sustainability Institute blog. In 2017 the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee opened an inquiry into forensic science. The inquiry is still open and has fours areas of focus: the forensic...
From: cradledincaricature on 29 Mar 2019

Bathurst Community Diary | The Redcoats will be there with pistol and sword duels.

https://www.westernadvocate.com.au/story/5945587/whats-on-living-history-in-a-day-of-historical-re-enactments-and-displays/?cs=146
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 13 Mar 2019

The itinerant chancellor

Four rows of designs with one to three designs in each, individually titled. Creator: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, lithographer, artist. Title: The itinerant chancellor [graphic] ; [and 9 other designs] / C.J. Grant invent.,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Oct 2018

Banning the Beard.

Last month it was reported that an officer in the Belfast Police was taking the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) to an industrial tribunal over a matter of personal appearance. More specifically, the tribunal will consider the legality of a rule...
From: DrAlun on 10 Oct 2018

From Blue Lobsters to Friendly Giants: Visual Representations of the Police, c.1840–188

Guest post by Jane M. Card; 27 August 2018. Images from the past are never to be taken at face value since, made according to contemporary visual conventions and artistic tastes, they reflect not objective reality but contemporary opinions about reality....
From: Legal History Miscellany on 27 Aug 2018

Thomas Scattergood: Forensic Toxicology in Victorian Yorkshire

By Cassie Watson and Laura Sellers; posted 19 December 2017. Thomas Scattergood, the son of a Methodist clergyman, was born in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, in 1826. In 1846 he was appointed to the post of assistant apothecary at the General Infirmary...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 19 Dec 2017

Help Dave get his guns back

David Dunstan is a farmer from the NSW town of Bungowannah. At 3:30am on Thursday 14th September, a man armed with a knife and piece of wood knocked on his back door.David grabbed his unloaded 22 rifle to confront him - aware that the man had earlier...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 20 Sep 2017

Mysterious Death: What Price the Medical Jurist?

By Cassie Watson; posted 11 June 2017. On the afternoon of Friday 27 September 1895 news broke of the discovery of the body of a young woman lying dead on a bed at 10 Denmark Street, Soho. She had been shot in the heart; beside her lay a man who, though...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 11 Jun 2017

Firearms Owners In Australia Fail To Support Each Other.

This I think is a prime example of how firearms owners in Australia DO NOT support each other. Not only that, but the different factions or special interest groups within firearms associations also fail to support each other. No wonder we are slowly but...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 25 Dec 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.