The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Politics"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Politics found 738 posts

June 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette or Weekly Post-Boy (June 19, 1769). “Elegant PICTURES, Framed and glazed in AMERICA.” Late in the spring of 1769, bookseller Garrat Noel placed an advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Jun 2019

Emotional Bodies in Context, a Symposium at The University of Adelaide 

By Meagan Nattrass, The University of Adelaide The Oxford English Dictionary defines the body as ‘the physical structure, including the bones, flesh, and organs, of a person or an animal,’ yet the Emotional Bodies in Context symposium recognised...
From: Histories of Emotion on 14 Jun 2019

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

When They See Us: a four part demonstration of what the US criminal (it is criminal) injustice system is

After long grueling hours of separate interrogation, the boys are put together & meet for the first time Friends and readers, Ava DuVernay has made another movie you must not miss — her others are Selma and 13th. Many people will know about...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 8 Jun 2019

Brexit, Corbyn, Anything but History: The Way People Talk About Poldark

“I fought for our liberty. For our hopes. For our dreams. And I’ll keep on fighting. Whatever the cost.” These words were first broadcast in 2016. They were spoken by Ross Poldark, shot in extreme close up, interspersed with images of...

Josiah Quincy, Jr.

Josiah Quincy, Jr.’s name is rarely mentioned in history books. This is because his name never appeared at the top of any leaderboard, that... The post Josiah Quincy, Jr. appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Anthony Trollope’s He Knew He Was Right: a scrutiny of clinical melancholia

Marcus Stone, “Trevelyan at Casalunga” Dear friends and readers, Though it’s been some time since I taught Trollope’s He Knew He Was Right, and I have published a chapter of my book (Trollope on the ‘Net) on this novel, and...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 4 Jun 2019

Why did Edmund Burke call the French Revolution a Democratic Revolution?

By Salih Emre Gercek Democracy’s fiercest opponents are responsible for its revival as a modern idea. In his Reflections on the Revolution in France,[1] in the autumn of 1790, Edmund Burke declared that the French Revolution was bringing democracy...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Jun 2019

June 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Weekly News-Letter (June 1, 1769). “North American Manufactures.” In the late 1760s, shopkeeper John Gore, Jr., became familiar to readers of several of Boston’s...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 Jun 2019

Andrew Davies’s Les Miserables

Lily Collins as Fantine, holding Mailow Defoy as the child Cosette (Episode 2) Dominic West as the elusive mayor (Episode 2) Andrew Davies produces video masterpieces as regularly as other people simply go out to a movie, and in the last few years or...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 26 May 2019

Grappling with Imperium in Imperio: Indivisible Sovereignty in Joseph Galloway’s British Empire

Although by 1775 hostilities between Great Britain and the American colonies had commenced, there were still those within the colonies who believed that the... The post Grappling with <i>Imperium in Imperio</i>: Indivisible Sovereignty in...

Reconciliation between the Colonies and Great Britain—A Close Call

There were many attempts, before and during the American Revolution, to avoid armed conflict via negotiation, or to stop the war after it began.... The post Reconciliation between the Colonies and Great Britain—A Close Call appeared first on Journal...

Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian: the War Begins, 1775

By the end of 1774, Catharine Macaulay had met Benjamin Rush, Arthur Lee, Richard Marchant, and Benjamin Franklin, and had corresponded with John Dickinson, James... The post Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian: the War...

Political Realism in Apocalyptic Times

This week’s horrific Easter bombings in Sri Lanka remind us once again of the troubling presence of religious violence in today’s world. Alison McQueen recent book, Political Realism in Apocalyptic Times (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,...

Another Three Loyalist Declarations Signed in the Fall of 1776

The Declaration of Dependence signed by 547 New York City Loyalists in November 1776 was not the only such declaration written and signed by loyal... The post Another Three Loyalist Declarations Signed in the Fall of 1776 appeared first on Journal...

The Mystery of “The Alternative of Williams-burg”

According to the Virginia Gazette between 400 and 500 merchants gathered in Williamsburg in early November 1774 and “voluntarily and generally signed” the Continental... The post The Mystery of “The Alternative of Williams-burg”...

Johan Joachim Zubly: The Other Georgia Delegate

When reading the excellent JAR article “The Dark and Heroic Histories of Georgia’s Signers,” I happened to recall another Georgia delegate to the Second... The post Johan Joachim Zubly: The Other Georgia Delegate appeared first on Journal...

“Be A King George”

“Be a King George.” Four simple, but oft repeated words drilled into the Prince of Wales from childhood by his mother, Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.... The post “Be A King George” appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Last Doolittle Raider Dies

Lt. Richard E. Cole, the last crewmember of the Doolittle Raiders, has died. Lt. Richard E. Cole, known as Dick Cole, was co-pilot on the lead plane, piloted by Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle, during a bombing mission on Tokyo in April 1942. Sixteen B-25...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.