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Search Results for "Politics During the War (1775-1783)"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Politics During the War (1775-1783) found 71 posts

This Week on Dispatches: Michael Cecere on Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor, author, and educator Michael Cecere on his recent article about Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg and... The post This Week on Dispatches: Michael Cecere...

This Week on Dispatches: Christopher Warren on Documents of the American Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Christopher Warren, historian and Curator of American History in the Rare Book & Special Collections Division of the... The post This Week on Dispatches: Christopher Warren on...

L’Expédition Particulière crosses the Atlantic: The French Rally to the American Cause

Following American success at Saratoga in the autumn of 1777, French King Louis XVI signed the Treaty of Amity and Friendship, establishing open French... The post L’Expédition Particulière crosses the Atlantic: The French Rally to...

Documents of the Revolution: A Continuum of Conviction

Those familiar with American history know that the Articles of Confederation served as the first constitution of the unified states during the American Revolution.... The post Documents of the Revolution: A Continuum of Conviction appeared first on Journal...

Opposing the Franco-American Alliance: The Case of Anne-Robert Jacques Turgot

The participation of the French on the side of the newly declared independent American colonies is widely acknowledged as the factor that tipped the... The post Opposing the Franco-American Alliance: The Case of Anne-Robert Jacques Turgot appeared first...

Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775

No one disputes that the fighting that erupted at Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 ignited a war between Great Britain and her... The post Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

General Charles Lee Imposes Oaths of Allegiance on Newport Tories, 1775

Major General Charles Lee visited Newport, Rhode Island, in late December 1775, where he—controversially—insisted that local Loyalists take an oath of allegiance to the... The post General Charles Lee Imposes Oaths of Allegiance on Newport...

Fending Chaos: The Early Years of Rufus King, Forgotten Founder

There are many ways to reach Jamaica, Queens, via public transit. From Brooklyn or Manhattan one could catch a Queens-bound F Train and remain... The post Fending Chaos: The Early Years of Rufus King, Forgotten Founder appeared first on Journal of the...

This Week on Dispatches: Patrick Naughton on Information Control and the Battles of Lexington and Concord

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews active US Army Major and JAR contributor Patrick Naughton on the narrative created by the Provincial Congress... The post This Week on Dispatches: Patrick Naughton on Information Control...

This Week on Dispatches: Justin McHenry on John Morgan, William Shippen, and the Fate of the Continental Medical Department

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews archivist and JAR contributor Justin McHenry about the heated rivalry between John Morgan and William Shippen over control... The post This Week on Dispatches: Justin McHenry on John...

Scouting the American Revolution: The French Intelligence Community

We often hear about intelligence activities which take place during times of war. Having good intelligence is indeed critical to military and diplomatic success.... The post Scouting the American Revolution: The French Intelligence Community appeared...

An Economist’s Solution to the War: Adam Smith and the Rebelling Colonies

Adam Smith, considered by many to be the Father of Modern Economics, was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland, on June 16, 1723. His father, also... The post An Economist’s Solution to the War: Adam Smith and the Rebelling Colonies appeared first on Journal...

Rutland’s Rebellion: Defending Local Governance during the Revolution

Typically, countries at war do not detain enemy prisoners in the backyards of their citizens. During the Revolutionary War Britain’s soon-to-be independent North American... The post Rutland’s Rebellion: Defending Local Governance during the...

Information Operations: The Provincial Congress Shapes the Narrative in Great Britain

The efforts of the American Provincial Congress at the beginning of the revolutionary war against Great Britain offer the perfect case study to understand... The post Information Operations: The Provincial Congress Shapes the Narrative in Great Britain...

John Morgan vs. William Shippen: The Battle that Defined the Continental Medical Department

John Morgan and William Shippen, Jr. stood shoulder to shoulder in the crowd outside of old Westminster Hall on September 22, 1761. They were... The post John Morgan vs. William Shippen: The Battle that Defined the Continental Medical Department appeared...

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