The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Portsmouth"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Portsmouth found 28 posts

Camouflage or Color Pop?

We drove up to Portsmouth to have lunch with my parents and afterwards took a long walk around the old town, as the restaurant I chose was definitely in the new! Portsmouth is experiencing a building boom like Salem, but better. We walked past Market...
From: streets of salem on 4 Feb 2020

Codfish Aristocracy

Growing up in York, Maine, my focus was increasingly over the river and out of state once I hit my teens, to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, a larger town with a mall, movie theaters, downtown shops, and lots and lots of restaurants. As I’ve said before,...
From: streets of salem on 2 Apr 2019

Henry Laurens in England, 1771–177

On October 9, 1771, a ship arrived at the southwestern tip of England. The Earl of Halifax had spent twenty nine days crossing the Atlantic... The post Henry Laurens in England, 1771–1772 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

What might have been: a Salem Tragedy

Things become crystal clear when you find yourself in a parallel universe and are able to discern what your universe lacks. Almost exactly a year ago, the Peabody Essex Museum notified researchers that the temporary Phillips Library location in Peabody...
From: streets of salem on 29 Aug 2018

A Turnkey Homestead

I’m using the expression “turnkey” in typical contrary fashion here: it’s a real estate term which generally means a house that requires no repairs or refurbishment, just turn the key and you are home in your new purchase. The...
From: streets of salem on 25 Aug 2018

Georgian Grandeur in Portsmouth

Portsmouth always struck me as a Georgian town, even from a young age, when I first developed an appreciation for historic houses at Strawbery Banke and first spotted what is still one of my very favorite houses nearby. There are Federal houses too, but...
From: streets of salem on 22 Aug 2018

Behind the Victorian Mask, a Federal Dandy

Secretary Desk as foundNot every Victorian is as dowdy as they might seem. Last year, at the Warner House in Portsmouth NH, we began to plan the exhibit for the next 2-year cycle and a larger curatorial re-assessment of the interior. The main exhibit...
From: SilkDamask on 28 Apr 2018

Don’t Mention the Cold War, Part

In this week’s first post, I gave my impressions of the dockyard town of Karlskrona and its terrific naval museum. Now on to the reason why I was there, an international conference on International Approaches to Naval Cities and Dockyards, held...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 26 Oct 2017

A Perfect June Afternoon for a Costume Tea

The 4th annual costume tea, held June 10th, 2107, at the Warner House in Portsmouth, NH was a success and a delight. If you missed it this year, hopefully you will be able to join us in 2018! A few photos from the afternoon......
From: SilkDamask on 10 Jun 2017

Captain Archibald and Lady Sarah Macpheadris invite you to join them at their grand home...

Captain Archibald and Lady Sarah Wentworth Macpheadris invite you to join them for an afternoon entertainment celebrating the ongoing 300th anniversary of the construction of their grand house, on June 10, 2017 from 12:00 to 3:00, in Portsmouth, New Hampshire....
From: SilkDamask on 22 May 2017

Call for Papers for the British Group of Early American Historians’ next conference

BGEAH 2017: “Land and Water: Port Towns, maritime connections, and oceanic spaces of the early modern Atlantic World.” Call for Papers The British Group of Early American Historians will hold its annual conference at the University of Portsmouth,...
From: The Junto on 10 Dec 2016

Escape from Salem, part II: Portsmouth Parallel

I was up in my hometown (York, Maine) this past weekend, and spent Saturday morning in nearby Portsmouth, New Hampshire, a favorite old and perennial haunt. One of the reasons I moved to Salem long ago is that it reminded me of Portsmouth: both are historic...
From: streets of salem on 10 Oct 2016

Archibald MacPheadris and His Room: A Baroque Merchant's House, 1716

Ascending the stairs Archibald Macpheadris built his house on the shores of the Piscataqua River in 1716. The house is a fine example of a London style late baroque merchant’s house—rare enough in England, but exceptional in the United States. ...
From: SilkDamask on 9 Jun 2016

Symposium: "Life and Death in the Piscataqua Region," Portsmouth, NH

Portsmouth Historic Sites Associates 12th annual Winter Symposium, "Life and Death in the Piscataqua Region" Saturday,February 6, 2016 10AM to 3PM St. John’s Masonic Temple, 351 Middle Street (the corner of Miller Avenue and Middle Street) Portsmouth...
From: SilkDamask on 2 Feb 2016

On Remembrance and Resurrection: Commemorating Portsmouth’s (NH) African Burying Ground

“I am the resurrection and the life.” This passage from John 11.25 comes the Bible passage describing Lazarus’s miraculous rise from the death, as he addressed Martha, the sister of Lazarus. For Christians, this lesson is supposed to...
From: The Junto on 1 Jun 2015

My Favorite Portsmouth House

I was running early for Easter dinner in York Harbor, and by myself because of a sick husband, so I decided to take a detour off 95 into Portsmouth to take a look at my very favorite house. As I grew up just over the bridge and down the road apiece in...
From: streets of salem on 7 Apr 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.