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Search Results for "Powder Alarm"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Powder Alarm found 26 posts

On the Night Before the Powder Alarm

Yesterday we left Esther Sewall in her house in rural Cambridge on the night of 1 Sept 1774.Sewall had two young sons. Her husband, attorney general Jonathan Sewall, had gone into Boston that morning. The household also included a couple of law students...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2019

Attack on Jonathan Sewall’s House

On 1 Sept 1774, Gen. Thomas Gage sent soldiers out to Charlestown to remove the provincial militia’s supply of gunpowder from the stone tower that still stands in what is now Somerville.Some of Gage’s troops went on into Cambridge and wheeled...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Sep 2019

When the “Powder Alarm” Came to Shrewsbury

Here’s a link to something else I didn’t realize was on the web: video of my Road to Concord presentation in Shrewsbury in January 2018. Chapter 2 of the book begins in that town:While Gen. Gage was arranging to remove the gunpowder from Charlestown,...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Aug 2019

The Life of Sarah Fayerweather

In 1756 Thomas Fayerweather (1724-1805), a wealthy Boston merchant, married Sarah Hubbard. She was a daughter of the treasurer of Harvard College, born in 1730. Her portrait by Robert Feke, now owned by Historic New England, appears here.According to...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jul 2019

The Powder Alarm Viewed from Westborough

Earlier in the summer I took note of the online edition of the diary of the Rev. Ebenezer Parkman of Westboro. One of the events Parkman lived through and recorded was the “Powder Alarm” of September 1774. In fact, by writing down news at...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Sep 2018

Upcoming Talks in Bedford, Weston, and Burlington

As we continue to look forward to spring weather and the approach of Patriots Day, I’m giving multiple Road to Concord talks over the next few weeks.Sunday, 25 March, 2:00 to 4:00 P.M.“What the Bedford Minutemen Went to Guard in Concord”...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Mar 2018

A Visit to Marlborough, 28 Nov.

On Tuesday, 28 November, I’ll speak about The Road to Concord to the Marlborough Historical Society. The town of Marlborough pops up multiple times in the story that book tells, starting with how it reportedly sent both infantry and mounted militia...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Nov 2017

“The Road to Concord” Runs through Lancaster, 6 Feb.

Soon after the “Powder Alarm” of 2 September 1774, Massachusetts towns began to look into their military resources. Among those towns was Lancaster, in the center of the province. It might seem surprising that a farm town of only 328 families...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jan 2017

Book Talk at the Massachusetts State Library, 29 Nov.

I’m pleased to report that The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War is now available in digital form for both the Kindle and Nook readers, as well as through iBooks. I suppose that as a modern author I should add...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Nov 2016

“An Intimation of the Bombardment of Boston”

Today is the anniversary of the militia uprising in 1774 that Richard Frothingham dubbed the “Powder Alarm” in his biography of Dr. Joseph Warren.On 2 Sept 1774 up to five thousand Massachusetts militiamen crowded into Cambridge, forcing every...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2016

Stamp Act Celebrations in Medford, Charlestown, and Cambridge

The same 26 May 1766 issue of the Boston Gazette that described Boston’s send-off to the Stamp Act in such detail also reported on celebrations in nearby towns. Militia companies played a big role in those activities.Medford’s celebration...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 May 2016

The Gunpowder and William Gamage

In my talk on Thursday, I related the Powder Alarm of 2 Sept 1774 from the point of view of Lt. Gov. Thomas Oliver. He was in Boston when that town’s radical leaders arrived out at the gathering of thousands of Middlesex County militiamen on Cambridge...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Mar 2016

“The very Time of the Convulsion” in Shrewsbury

On Thursday I’ll speak at Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site about “The End of Tory Row,” the events that led to drastic changes in that neighborhood in September 1774. (Here’s more information.)Here’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Mar 2016

“The End of Tory Row” in Cambridge, 24 Mar.

Among the historical talks on Thursday, 24 March, here’s the one I’ll attend: “The End of Tory Row,” at Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site in Cambridge.I’ll be there because I’ll...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Mar 2016

What Sort of Gift Do You Get for a 250th Anniversary?

I’ve been promoting awareness of the Sestercentennial of the American Revolution, in part by describing what happened in the American colonies 250 years ago and in part by using the word “sestercentennial” a lot. On Monday, 30 November,...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Nov 2015

Poking through the Joseph Hawley Papers

Harvard University isn’t the only institution digitizing Revolutionary-era documents, of course.The New York Public Library ended up with a bunch of significant papers from Massachusetts, including Samuel Adams’s papers and the correspondence...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Nov 2015

“Women of Tory Row” Tour, 20 Sept.

Saturday, 20 September, is this year’s Cambridge Discovery Day. The city’s historical commission has organized a series of walking tours, exhibits, and lectures, most of them free. I’m leading a tour of Brattle Street called “The Women of Tory...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Sep 2014

Celebration of 1774 in Worcester, 7 Sept.

Worcester will celebrate the county’s uprising against the royal courts in September 1774 this Sunday, the 7th. Here’s the complete schedule as of early last month.ALL DAYGames and Crafts for Children — The OaksBig Bear Trading Company — Institute...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2014

Should Today Be “Salem Gunpowder Day”?

Earlier this month the Boston Globe published an essay by the historian Peter Charles Hoffer that it headlined, “Happy Salem Gunpowder Day! Did American independence start with a peaceful protest? The case for a new holiday.”That holiday would be...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Feb 2014

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.