The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Presentism"

Your search for posts with tags containing Presentism found 9 posts

Debating (Canadian) Presentism: Narrative, Nation, and Macdonald in 2021

Jerry Bannister Like many Canadian historians, I have followed with interest the ongoing debate over John A. Macdonald, including the recent letter sponsored by the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. Among the thoughtful responses to the letter, I’d highlight...
From: Borealia on 2 Feb 2021

“Strategic Presentism” and 18th-Century Studies

My deepest thanks to Katarzyna Bartoszynska and Eugenia Zuroski for having me on this panel alongside this great lineup of people I admire.  It’s a pleasure to have Anna Kornbluh here to help us think through what V21 might have to offer us...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 19 Nov 2018

The “Ordinary Science” of Literary Studies

When V21 and the V21 manifesto first appeared a few years ago I was very excited and something of a cheerleader from the sidelines of social media. Who doesn’t like a group of younger scholars standing up and telling the older generation that it...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 19 Nov 2018

“Dialectical Presentism:” Race, Empire, and Slavery in 18th-Century Studies

Like many of you, I’ve followed the V21 developments with much interest and excitement, if I’ve largely done so from the margins (this is the first time I’ve been a part of any formal discussion about V21).  There are so many things...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 18 Nov 2018

ASECS and V21 Roundtable Organizers’ Response: Collective Ways Forward

When we put out the call for participants on this roundtable, we asked whether eighteenth-century studies needed its own V21 moment, but we must confess that in thinking about the relationship between the two communities, we found ourselves wondering,...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 18 Nov 2018

Presentism in Environmental History: The View from the Sixteenth Century

Jack Bouchard Note: This is the first in a series on environmental history and early modern history cross-posted with  NiCHE, the Network in Canadian History & Environment. In the 1560s, if you were a European mariner in search...
From: Borealia on 4 Jun 2018

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace Presentism

Carla Cevasco reflects on teaching early American history in conversation with current events.
From: The Junto on 18 Apr 2018

Science, Meet Slavery: ‘River of Dark Dreams’ and the Future of Slavery Scholarship

Read partly as a history of science, River of Dark Dreams is in fact up-to-date in more than one way. It’s both a cautionary tale against believing in technology’s all conquering powers, as well as a still too rare attempt to incorporate current themes...
From: The Junto on 8 Jun 2013

Early America and the Historical Wing of the “Conservative Entertainment Complex”

Michael D. Hattem examines some of the historical inaccuracies and misconceptions regarding the founders and the eighteenth century that are perpetuated by the "historical wing of the 'conservative entertainment complex'" and inform the Tea Party's rhetoric...
From: The Junto on 18 Dec 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.