The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Prewar Conflict (<1775)"

Your search for posts with tags containing Prewar Conflict (<1775) found 16 posts

This Week on Dispatches: Dayne Rugh on the Connecticut Sons of Liberty

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Director of Education for Slater Memorial Museum and JAR contributor Dayne Rugh on his recent article about... The post This Week on Dispatches: Dayne Rugh on the Connecticut Sons of Liberty...

Thomas Pownall, Governor of Massachusetts, August 1757 to December 1758

Thomas Pownall was appointed “Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over . . . the Province of the Massachusetts Bay” on February 25, 1757. He... The post Thomas Pownall, Governor of Massachusetts, August 1757 to December 1758 appeared...

Thomas Pownall: Formative Years of an Anti-Taxation Member of Parliament

Thomas Pownall, the eldest son of William and Sarah Pownall, was born on September 4, 1722 in Lincoln, England. His father, a country gentleman,... The post Thomas Pownall: Formative Years of an Anti-Taxation Member of Parliament appeared first on Journal...

The Boston Massacre: A Family History

The Boston Massacre:  A Family History by Serena Zabin. (Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020) The significant other of this particular reviewer saw him reading yet... The post The Boston Massacre: A Family History appeared first...

1774: The Long Year of Revolution

1774: The Long Year of Revolution by Mary Beth Norton (Knopf, 2020) Although previous works have tried to draw attention to “The Missing 16... The post 1774: The Long Year of Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Grand Affray at Golden Hill: New York City, January 19, 177

Despite the rescission of the Stamp Act in 1766, many imperial controversies persisted in New York City. Leading among them were: The annual demands of... The post The Grand Affray at Golden Hill: New York City, January 19, 1770 appeared first on...

“The Americans Have Hoisted Their Standard of Liberty at Salem”

The skirmishes at Lexington and Concord are often considered the beginning of the American Revolution, a violent change in the controversy between Great Britain... The post “The Americans Have Hoisted Their Standard of Liberty at Salem” appeared...

The Tea that Survived the Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party famously saw the destruction of the almost 300 chests worth of tea, tossed into the harbor by “Indians” on December 16,... The post The Tea that Survived the Boston Tea Party appeared first on Journal of the American...

Josiah Quincy, Jr.

Josiah Quincy, Jr.’s name is rarely mentioned in history books. This is because his name never appeared at the top of any leaderboard, that... The post Josiah Quincy, Jr. appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“My Dear Nell:” The Love Letters of John Moultrie

Dr. John Moultrie was born in 1729 in South Carolina to a father of the same name, one of five brothers. Educated in Edinburgh,... The post “My Dear Nell:” The Love Letters of John Moultrie appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Thomas Paine Goes to Sea: A Pre-Revolutionary Tale

Coming up rapidly from behind the British privateer, the frigate suddenly lowered one national flag and raised another, the customary ruse of switching colors,... The post Thomas Paine Goes to Sea: A Pre-Revolutionary Tale appeared first on Journal of...

The Conspiracy to Destroy the Gaspee

With but few exceptions,[1] it has usually been surmised by historians that the 1772 attack on the Royal Navy schooner Gaspee was a spontaneous... The post The Conspiracy to Destroy the Gaspee appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The James McMichael Journal, May 27, 1776–October 29, 1776

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a five-part series. The “Diary” of Lieutenant James McMichael first appeared in 1890 in the Pennsylvania Archives... The post The James McMichael Journal, May 27, 1776–October 29, 1776 appeared...

This Licentious Republic: Maritime Skirmishes in Narragansett Bay 1763-1769

As a British colony located on the Atlantic Ocean, Rhode Island’s wealth grew by utilizing the ocean’s vast resources. Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay is... The post This Licentious Republic: Maritime Skirmishes in Narragansett Bay 1763-1769...

Country Crowds in Revolutionary Massachusetts: Mobs and Militia

Peter Oliver, the Crown-appointed Chief Justice of provincial Massachusetts, knew how to discredit popular protest. Mindless and incapable of acting on their own, crowds... The post Country Crowds in Revolutionary Massachusetts: Mobs and Militia appeared...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.