The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Primary Sources"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Primary Sources found 107 posts

Benedict Arnold’s Masterplan (for British) Victory

Even by Victorian standards Great Massingham, Norfolk was a sleepy hamlet. Though it had been a settled community since Norman times, in 1880 it... The post Benedict Arnold’s Masterplan (for British) Victory appeared first on Journal of the American...

1656 John Hammond's Defense of Servitude for Women in Virginia

19C Depiction of Females Arriving In Jamestown, Virginia's Indentured ServantsSource: John Hammond. Leah and Rachel, or, The Two Fruitful Sisters Virginia and Maryland: Their Present Condition, Impartially Stated and Related (1656)It is the glory of every...
From: 17th-century American Women on 17 Feb 2018

The James McMichael Journal, November 1, 1776–June 3, 1777

Editor’s Note: This is part two of a five-part series. The portion of James McMichael’s journal covering November 1, 1776 through June 3, 1777... The post The James McMichael Journal, November 1, 1776–June 3, 1777 appeared first on Journal...

1645 John Winthrop's Speech On Liberty

On Liberty by John WinthropJohn Winthrop 1587/8-1649 In 1645, while he was deputy-governor of Massachusetts, John Winthrop and his fellow-magistrates had interfered in a local election of a militia officer. When the dispute flared into a war of words,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 1 Aug 2013

The James McMichael Journal, May 27, 1776–October 29, 1776

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a five-part series. The “Diary” of Lieutenant James McMichael first appeared in 1890 in the Pennsylvania Archives... The post The James McMichael Journal, May 27, 1776–October 29, 1776 appeared...

1619 Laws Enacted by the 1st General Assembly of Virginia

.Laws Enacted by the First General Assembly of Virginia 1619By this present General Assembly be it enacted that no injury or oppression be wrought by the English against the Indians whereby the present peace might be distributed and ancient quarrels might...
From: 17th-century American Women on 14 Jul 2014

1661 On Improving the Virginia Church

It all sounds vaguely familiar...Build some towns, raise some money, tax the rich, educate the kids, & institute term limits...Virginia's Cure: OR, An ADVISIVE NARRATIVE CONCERNING VIRGINIA.DISCOVERING The true Ground of that CHURCH’S Unhappiness,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 5 Jun 2013

1666 Defense of Servitude in Maryland

The necessariness of Servitude proved, with the common usage of Servants in Mary-Land, together with their PriviledgesAs there can be Monarchy without the Supremacy of a King and Crown, nor no King without Subjects, nor any Parents without it be by the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 10 Jun 2013

French Huguenot looks at 1687 Puritan Boston

.A French Protestant Immigrant's Impression of in Boston, 1687This French Huguenot arrived in Massachusettes with 30 families in the fall of 1687. Thousands of French Protestants fled first to England; and from there, many sailed for the British American...
From: 17th-century American Women on 14 Jan 2018

1693 Puritan Cotton Mather on Rules for Negros

Cotton Mather, (1663-1728) was a socially & politically influential New England Puritan minister Cotton Mather's (1663-1728) RULES For the Society of NEGROES. 1693. (Mather's rules for allowing African Americans to worship in the church.)WE the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Sep 2013

1642 Laws for Harvard College - No Women Allowed

Harvard College Laws of 1642(from New England's First Fruits)1. When any Schollar is able to Read Tully or such like classicall Latine Author ex tempore, and make and speake true Latin in verse and prose suo (ut aiunt) Marte, and decline perfectly the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 6 Jan 2018

1640 Founding of Harvard College, for Men Only

New England's First Fruits 1640, for Men Only, Of Course...The History of the Founding of Harvard CollegeAFTER GOD HAD carried us safe to New England, and we had built our houses, provided necessaries for our livelihood, reared convenient places for God's...
From: 17th-century American Women on 4 Jan 2018

1640 Preface to the Bay Psalm Book

Preface to the 1640 "Bay Psalm Book" Probably written by Richard MatherRichard Mather Born in Lancashire, England, 1596. Died in Dorchester, Mass. 1669The singing of Psalms, though it breath forth nothing but holy harmony, and melody: yet such is the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 2 Jan 2018

The 1637 Massachusetts Trial of Mother & Religious Troublemaker Anne Hutchinson 1591-1643

Anne Hutchinson was born in 1591, in England. She immigrated with her husband to the Massachusettes Bay Colony in 1634, and was banished from it in 1637. She and her husband had 10 children. She died from an Indian raid in 1643.Anne Hutchinson challenged...
From: 17th-century American Women on 31 Dec 2017

1629 The Charter of Massachsetts Bay

The 1629 Charter Of Massachusetts BayBoston Harbor and adjacent settlements in 1667. Thought to be a specimen of the first engraving executed in America.And further, That the said Governour and Companye, and their Successors, maie have forever one comon...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Dec 2017

1630 John Winthrop's City on a Hill Declaration

Excerpts from "A Model of Christian Charity" by John Winthrop 1630It rests now to make some application of this discourse.… 1. For the persons. We are a company professing ourselves fellow members of Christ, in which respect only though we were absent...
From: 17th-century American Women on 30 Jul 2013

1643 The New England Confederation

The New England ConfederationThe New England Confederation, was a political and military alliance of the English colonies of Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut, and New Haven. Established May 29, 1643. Its primary purpose was to unite the Puritan colonies...
From: 17th-century American Women on 21 Dec 2017

1629 A few problems in early New England

A Short and True Description of New Englandby the Rev. Francis Higginson, written in 1629  Printed for Michael Sparke, London, 1630.Francis Higginson (1588-1630) was an early Puritan minister in Colonial New England, and the first minister of Salem,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 9 Jul 2013

1629 The Countryside in New England

A Short and True Description of New Englandby the Rev. Francis Higginson, written in 1629  Printed for Michael Sparke, London, 1630.Francis Higginson (1588-1630) was an early Puritan minister in Colonial New England, and the first minister of Salem,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 7 Jul 2013

1629 Song birds & "strange fowls" in New England

A Short and True Description of New Englandby the Rev. Francis Higginson, 1629Francis Higginson (1588-1630) was an early Puritan minister in Colonial New England, and the first minister of Salem, Massachusetts.Fowls of the air are plentiful here, and...
From: 17th-century American Women on 11 Jul 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.