The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Print Culture"

Showing 1 - 20 of 191

Your search for posts with tags containing Print Culture found 191 posts

September 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (September 8, 1769). “A Negro Girl, between 2 and 3 Years of Age.” In the late 1760s, the Connecticut Journal, published in New Haven by Thomas Green...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Sep 2019

Q&A with Joseph Adelman

Today, The Junto interviews our own Joseph Adelman about his new book Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763–1789. Jordan Taylor’s review of the book appeared yesterday. Junto:...
From: The Junto on 4 Sep 2019

Review: Adelman, Revolutionary Networks

Joseph M. Adelman, Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763–1789 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019). Historians often rely on a pair of archetypes to think about early American newspaper printers....
From: The Junto on 3 Sep 2019

Anon. ‘Robin Hood’ (1828)

The following poem, written anonymously and titled simply as ‘Robin Hood’, appeared in The Oriental Observer and Literary Chronicle in 1828. The newspaper, printed in Calcutta during the rule of the East India Company, went through a number...

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

Archives Lost: The French Revolution and the Destruction of Medieval French Manuscripts

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Apr 2019

Henry Christophe Rebound: Juste Chanlatte’s Lost Play ‘Néhri’ and the Afterlife of the Kingdom of Haiti

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Apr 2019

March 24

GUEST CURATOR: Sean Duda What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Boston Chronicle (March 23-27, 1769). “Several BARRELS of SOAP, and a variety of European GOODS.” In this advertisement Elias Dupee is trying...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Mar 2019

The Politics of Victorian England’s “Vicious Republican”: G. W. M. Reynolds (1814–79)

By Stephen Basdeo It’s quite possible that you’ve never heard of George William MacArthur Reynolds (1814–79). His prolific writing career has been overshadowed somewhat by his contemporaries such as Charles Dickens, whose writings, while...

Pamphlet of Protest: Revolution, Exile, and Abolition in Chautard’s Escapes from Cayenne

By Michaël Roy In September 1857, Jean-Léon Chautard, Charles Bivors, and Louis Antoine Hippolyte Paon arrived in Boston, Massachusetts. The three French refugees from the Revolution of 1848 were “homeless, penniless, friendless, strangers...
From: Age of Revolutions on 4 Feb 2019

Astronomy and Printing

The Printing Museum in Tokyo has what looks to be an amazing temporary exhibit right now on astronomy and print, aptly named “Astronomy and Printing. In search of new world vision.”[1] Astronomy and Printing, a special exhibition at the Printing...
From: Darin Hayton on 2 Jan 2019

Sedition

By Stephen Basdeo Since the Victorian era, even though they lack a formal written constitution, the English people have always enjoyed a high degree of freedom of speech and political freedom. In the early nineteenth century, many journalists and publishers...

October 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (October 19, 1768).“A few new Negroes, will be sold on the most reasonable terms.” The partnership of Cowper and Telfairs repeatedly inserted a list-style...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Oct 2018

September

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (September 20, 1768).“TO BE SOLD … A Likely, strong, and remarkably healthy Negro Girl.” The Essex Gazette commenced publication in Salem, Massachusetts,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Sep 2018

Following the Fashions: A Basic American Pastime

Today’s #ColonialCouture post is by Amy Sopcak-Joseph, a doctoral candidate in American history at the University of Connecticut. She is working on her dissertation, “Fashioning American Women: Godey’s Lady’s Book, Female Consumers,...
From: The Junto on 14 Sep 2018

Why We Will Not Go

How and why does a group in a society feel affection for the society they live in, despite the constant abuses faced by them? A great case study to help answer the question is through the anti-slavery movement. Boston abolitionist intellectual Maria Stewart,...
From: The Junto on 6 Sep 2018

#WomenAlsoKnowDemocracy: Women, Print Culture, and Transatlantic Revolution in 1790s America

This post is a part of our “Challenging Democratic Revolutions” series, which explores the ways in which democratic ideologies challenged Old Regimes and how revolutionaries challenged notions of democratic liberty. By Michelle Orihel...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Sep 2018

From Platform to Publisher: Facebook, the Early American Open Press, and Alex Jones

Jordan E. Taylor explores the early American "open press" and what it can tell us about the tech giants' decision to remove Alex Jones.
From: The Junto on 7 Aug 2018

Defining Democracy, Challenging ‘Democrats’

This is the inaugural post of our “Challenging Democratic Revolutions” series, which explores the ways in which democratic ideologies challenged Old Regimes and how revolutionaries challenged notions of democratic liberty. By Matthew...
From: Age of Revolutions on 16 Jul 2018

Convulsions Within: When Printing the Declaration of Independence Turns Partisan

By Emily Sneff The New York Times first devoted an entire page to the Declaration of Independence exactly 100 years ago, on July 4, 1918. Thirty years ago, NPR’s Morning Edition began a tradition of reading the Declaration on air. Last year, NPR...
From: Age of Revolutions on 4 Jul 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.