The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Printer"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Printer found 492 posts

Upcoming Programs from the Marblehead Museum

The Marblehead Museum’s upcoming online events include two about the Revolutionary period.Thursday, 17 September, 7:00 P.M.A Furious Sky: The Five-Hundred-Year History of America’s HurricanesMarblehead author Eric Jay Dolin discusses his new...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Sep 2020

“Poor are the Boston-Poor indeed”

In May 1774, Gen. Thomas Gage arrived in Boston with the news that he was the new royal governor and that Parliament had ordered the port closed to most shipping. Anticipating increased unemployment, the town of Boston began what we’d call public-works...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2020

Finding the Printer “E. Oswald”

I flagged this essay by Michelle Orihel at the Age of Revolutions blog for sharing just shy of two years ago, but here’s an extract at last:In May 1793, the Democratic Society of Pennsylvania published its constitution as a pamphlet entitled, Principles,...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Sep 2020

August 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “They have Removed their PRINTING-OFFICE two Doors lower down Queen-Street.” Colonial printers adopted various strategies when it came to inserting advertisements...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Aug 2020

“I hereby revoke all and every Sentence”

Recently I came across this advertisement in the 13 Oct 1768 Boston News-Letter:Whereas the Wife of me the Subscriber has eloped from me, and I am apprehensive she will run me in Debt. I hereby forbid all Persons from trusting her on my Account, as I...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Aug 2020

August 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Settlement with the Customers is become necessary.” In eighteenth-century America, printers, like other entrepreneurs, sometimes had to resort to publishing advertisements...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Aug 2020

August 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Has removed his PRINTING-OFFICE from Philadelphia to Burlington.” In the summer of 1770, printer Isaac Collins closed his printing office in Philadelphia in favor of...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Aug 2020

The Launch of the Massachusetts Spy

On Tuesday, 7 Aug 1770, 250 years ago today, the second issue of the Massachusetts Spy appeared.The very first issue, dated 17 July, was a test to drum up subscriptions, distributed for free. The printers had projected regular publication to start at...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Aug 2020

Assault on a “young lad” in Marlborough

Now to get back to events in Marlborough in July 1770.Back here I quoted a letter published in the Boston Gazette on 30 July 1770, describing an effigy of local merchant Henry Barnes on horseback. And here I quoted the part of that article discussing...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jul 2020

News from France and “the language of patriotism”

Boston’s Civic Festival to honor the new republic of France on 24 Jan 1793 came at an unusual cultural and political moment. The latest news from Europe relayed the events of late 1792. Bostonians knew about how the French assembly had deposed Louis...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jul 2020

July 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Hear of good Encouragement, by applying to the Printer at the Exchange.” By the late 1760s, entrepreneurial colonists established and advertised “intelligence...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Jul 2020

Citizens at Boston’s Civic Festival of 1793

I’m jumping around among multiple series here [whatever happened to the Saga of the Brazen Head?], but there’s no better date than 14 July to return to Boston’s celebration of republican France in 1793.At the start of the month I quoted...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jul 2020

Capt. Preston and the Boston Committee

At 3:00 P.M. on Friday, 13 July 1770—250 years ago today—the white men of Boston resumed their town meeting in Faneuil Hall.There was only one item of real business: approving a town committee’s response to what was being published in...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jul 2020

July 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “All Persons indebted to him, to discharge the same.” Charles Crouch, the printer of the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal, wanted to make sure that readers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Jul 2020

A Meeting to Protect the Town’s Reputation

Back in late March 1770, the Boston town meeting had commissioned Capt. Andrew Gardner to carry its official report on the Boston Massacre and other documents to London. Gardner arrived in the imperial capital in early May. That was a couple of weeks...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jul 2020

Reading Too Much into the Declaration

Here’s something I’ve been thinking about since I heard the “Celebrating the Fourth” episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast from Liz Covart and the Omohundro Institute. That episode came out a year ago, though it took...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Jul 2020

The Origin of “Liberty Stump”

In 1796 the British-born, Philadelphia-based bookseller and publisher William Cobbett issued “A History of the American Jacobins, &c.” as an pseudonymous appendix to his edition of William Playfair’s The History of Jacobinism, Its...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Jul 2020

“Tom Gage’s Proclamation” Parodied

The Readex newspaper database I use offers this page from the 28 June 1775 issue of the Pennsylvania Journal and Weekly Advertiser.In fact, it offers two images of this page, apparently identical.Obviously, someone clipped an item out of the copy of that...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jun 2020

The Last of the Boston Chronicle

On 25 June 1770, 250 years ago today, this announcement appeared in the Boston Chronicle: The Printers of the Boston Chronicle return thanks to the Gentlemen, who have so long favoured them with their Subscriptions, and now inform them that, as the Chronicle,...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Jun 2020

Alarming News from Across the Atlantic

On 21 June 1770, 250 years ago today, the Boston News-Letter reported startling news from London. So startling that Richard Draper added a two-page “Extraordinary” sheet to his newspaper.On Monday the 18th, Capt. James Hall had arrived from...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jun 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.