The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Printers"

Showing 1 - 20 of 458

Your search for posts with tags containing Printers found 458 posts

September 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “PURDIE and DIXON have imported a fresh Assortment of all Kinds of Paper.” Like many other colonial printers, Alexander Purdie and John Dixon took advantage of their access...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Sep 2021

August

Who was the subject of an advertisement in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Run-away … a Molatto Fellow named BEN.” On July 20, 1771, Ben, an enslaved man, liberated himself from Isaac Woodruff of Waterbury, Connecticut.  Two...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 2 Aug 2021

“Mounted on the goat richly caparisoned for the occasion”

Robert Donkin was born in 1727 and by the eventful year of 1745 was an officer in the British army. In the Seven Years’ War he served as an aide to Gen. Thomas Fowke and Gen. William Rufane. In 1772 Capt. Donkin married Mary Collins, daughter of a clergyman....
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jun 2021

June 17

Who was the subject of an advertisement in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “For further Particulars, enquire of Edes & Gill.” Two short advertisements about enslaved people appeared in the June 17, 1771, edition of the Boston...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Jun 2021

May 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “RUN away … a Negro Man named GLASGOW.” Near the end of April 1770, Dover, an enslaved man, liberated himself from Nathaniel Sperry of New Haven.  As the anniversary of Dover...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 May 2021

May

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “A large and elegant Assortment of Chinces, Callicoes, printed Cottons … at the House of Mr. Russell in Long-Lane.” Following the custom of the time, the May 20, 1771,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 May 2021

“A view or plan of the battle of Bunker’s hill”

On 10 May 1816, the Wilkesbarre Gleaner newspaper, published by Charles Miner, announced a discovery about the Battle of Bunker Hill, more than forty years earlier. According to a reprint in Niles’s Weekly Register the following month, it said:...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Apr 2021

The Lost DeBerniere Manuscripts

On 30 June 1775, Ens. Henry DeBerniere was promoted to the rank of lieutenant in the 10th Regiment of Foot. Nine months later, on 17 March 1776, he evacuated Boston with the rest of the British military. That departure was rushed enough that Lt. DeBerniere...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Apr 2021

April 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “A POEM. By Doctor GOLDSMITH, author of THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD and THE TRAVELLER.” In the spring of 1771, William Bradford and Thomas Bradford, printers in Philadelphia,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Apr 2021

Reverse Course on the Copley Cartoon?

Yesterday I mused about the possibility that a British political cartoon inspired some elements of the Loyall Nine’s anti-Stamp Act protests in late 1765—in particular, hanging the stamp agents in effigy and dedicating a tree to liberty. That...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Mar 2021

A Pyrrhic Victory in the Printers’ Case

In Parliament, 250 years ago this season, there was a big step forward in press freedom to report about how English-speaking governments worked. Back in 1731, Edward Cave launched the Gentleman’s Magazine, which among its features included detailed...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Mar 2021

“King of the Narragansett tribe of Indians”?

The second Boston Tea Party cemented the “Indian disguises” aspect of the events. On the morning after the Fortune arrived in Boston harbor, the report in Edes and Gill’s radical Boston Gazette ended by saying: The SACHEMS must have...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Mar 2021

The New Massachusetts Spy

Two hundred and fifty years ago, the Massachusetts Spy had gone a full month without a new issue.Zechariah Fowle and Isaiah Thomas had launched that newspaper in the summer of 1770 with ambitious goals. As described back here, it was smaller than the...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Mar 2021

February 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The following BOOKS, which will be Sold for a little more than the SterlingCost.” John Boyles placed identical advertisements in the Boston-Gazette and the Massachusetts...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Feb 2021

“The First BIBLE ever printed in America”?

As I quoted yesterday, Isaiah Thomas grew up as an apprentice printer hearing stories about how his master, Zechariah Fowle, had helped to secretly print a New Testament in the late 1740s. Thomas also heard about a complete Bible completed by another...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Feb 2021

London Imprints on Boston Bibles?

In 1756 the Boston Overseers of the Poor indentured Isaiah Thomas as an apprentice to the printer Zechariah Fowle (1724-1776). He was seven years old and didn’t yet know how to read. Isaiah’s father had died, and his mother apparently felt...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2021

A Short Narrative “from the London Edition”?

On 16 July 1770, six days after the Boston town meeting reaffirmed its ban on selling copies of its Short Narrative of the Horrid Massacre locally, this advertisement appeared in the Boston Evening-Post:Next WEDNESDAY will be Published,[from the London...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2021

“The printed Narratives of the late horred Massacre”

This week I watched an online talk by Robert Darnton about his new book Pirating and Publishing: The Book Trade in the Age of Enlightenment. He described various stratagems printers and booksellers used to get around two stifling forces in ancien régime...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2021

Happy Birthday, Isaiah Thomas!

Isaiah Thomas, patriot printer and founder of the American Antiquarian Society, was born on January 30 (January 19 Old Style) in 1749.  It’s quite an historical coincidence that the three most significant printers in eighteenth-century America...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Jan 2021

Happy Birthday, Mathew Carey!

Though Benjamin Franklin is often considered the patron saint of American advertising in the popular press, I believe that his efforts pale in comparison to the contributions made by Mathew Carey (1760-1839) in the final decades of the eighteenth...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jan 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.