The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Prints"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Prints found 470 posts

Jemmy Whittle, the Devil, St Dunstan and the Laughing Boy

The Laughing Boy c.1780 The name James Whittle (1757 – 1818) will no doubt be familiar to readers of The Printshop Window. Whittle and his partner Robert Laurie (1755-1836) co-owned one of eighteenth-century London’s most well-known printshops....
From: The Print Shop Window on 4 Dec 2020

New book: C.J. Grant’s Political Drama: Radicalism and Graphic Satire in the Age of Reform

You might have noticed that things have been rather quiet around here for the last year or two? There are a lot of reasons for this: I have a family and a job like many of you, but I’ve also been spending most of my spare time writing a book about...
From: The Print Shop Window on 5 Aug 2020

Leaving no Tracks By Robert Griffing.

Leaving no Tracks By Robert Griffing.https://lordnelsons.com/gallery/frontier/griffing/107LeavingNoTracks.htm
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Apr 2020

New Frontier Art Painting/Prints

Hunting Partners By David Wright.Misty Crossing By David Wright.Available from: https://lordnelsons.com/gallery/Originals/Originals_MainHMTA2020index.htm;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 21 Apr 2020

April 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Copper-Plate PRINT, containing a View of Part of the Town of Boston in New-England, and British Ships of War landing their Troops in the Year 1768.” The simultaneous...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Apr 2020

William, the ‘Wicked Lord’ Byron – actress abducter & cowardly killer?

Dearest readers, A new video is UP! See below for a quick intro to the angry, dissipated career of William, 5th Lord Byron – known to history as ‘the Wicked Lord’ or ‘Devil Byron’/ Features actress abduction, a wolf, &...
From: The History of Love on 10 Apr 2020

Something Splashing This Way Comes by John Buxton

Something Splashing This Way Comes by John Buxtonhttps://lordnelsons.com/gallery/frontier/buxton/66SomethingSplashing.htm
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 5 Feb 2020

"Wolves of the Mohawk Valley" By DON TROIANI

"Wolves of the Mohawk Valley" By DON TROIANIhttp://www.dontroiani.com/commissions.shtml;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 7 Sep 2019

The matter reversed

“The Duchess of Devonshire sits astride a galloping fox, her face to its tail. A signpost by the fox’s head points (left) ‘To Cuckolds Hall’; on the top of the post is a pair of horns. The Duchess wears a hat trimmed with ostrich...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 27 Jun 2019

Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it

“The Duchess of St. Albans, immensely fat, florid, and bejewelled, and a stout elderly naval officer wearing loose wide trousers, and apparently doing hornpipe steps, his hands on his hips, dance side by side with rollicking abandon. The others...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Jun 2019

The fair in an uproar

With a large woodcut below the title and preceding the letterpress text: Madamoiselle Javellot is shown on stage flanked on either side by chandeliers wtih her performing dogs in costumes in front and a musician in the background, left, behind the curtain....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Jun 2019

June 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette or Weekly Post-Boy (June 19, 1769). “Elegant PICTURES, Framed and glazed in AMERICA.” Late in the spring of 1769, bookseller Garrat Noel placed an advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Jun 2019

A short ride in the Long Walk, or, The ponies posed!!

“George IV drives Lady Conyngham in a four-wheeled pony-chaise. He is chubbily obese, in loose trousers and braided jacket, wearing a cap poised on his naturalistic curls (cf. British Museum Satires no. 14637). He turns to the enormously corpulent...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 19 Jun 2019

Irish M.P.’s

An Irish schoolmaster-priest, sits in a chair taking a pinch of snuff from an open snuff box as he catechizes a dwarfish Irish peasant, ragged and barelegged, who answers with a sly grin: ‘O’C — for O’Connell thats right–now...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 18 Jun 2019

A kiss at the congress

“Louis XVIII, grotesquely obese (left), and the Tsar kiss, their lips touching. Louis, whose head is much the larger, grasps the back of Alexander’s head; the Tsar bends from the waist to reach beyond the King’s paunch. Louis, with the...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Jun 2019

Slugs in a saw-pit hell to pay

“Two timorous duellists face each other at close quarters in a saw-pit, trembling and dropping their weapons, namely pistol and blunderbuss; each has a heap of weapons at his feet: sabres, rapier, pistol, more blunderbusses. The hair of both rises...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 7 Jun 2019

Modern aquatics

“A Thames wherry passes close to the wall of a riverside tavern, and is about to go under a high timber bridge. The two oarsmen have immense artificial-looking whiskers and curled hair, cf. British Museum satires no. 15962, no hats, and wear striped...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 6 Jun 2019

The man wots got the whip hand of ’em all

“A hand printing-press of metal (a Stanhope Press), supported on the stout legs of a man in breeches which seem to belong to a John Bull, puts to flight mere pigmy humans: two flee to the right, one propelled by a kick from a huge buckled shoe;...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 5 Jun 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.