The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Publishing found 244 posts

World of the Siege FOR SALE

At fine bookshops everywhere. It’s been a long time coming, but it’s finally here. So go right out and purchase one or ten copies of the sleeper hit of the summer! To quote from the tightly-constructed blurb: The World of the Siege examines...
From: Skulking in Holes and Corners on 15 Aug 2019

Keep Calm and R&R

It’s August, and for academics hoping to get some writing done this summer, it’s go time. In conversations with my writing group colleagues, who come from fields as diverse as information sciences, business, community health, and religion,...
From: The Junto on 6 Aug 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XI

Despite the high level of anticipation De revolutionibus cannot be in anyway described as hitting the streets running; it was more a case of dribbling out very slowly into the public awareness. There are several reasons for this. Today there is a...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 22 May 2019

At last, MURDER KNOCKS TWICE is out in the world...

There's a funny thing about persistence that writers often talk about. We talk about continuing despite the odds, mustering up the courage to keep writing even when things get hard, just pushing on even when the outcome is not known.This is what I felt...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 30 Apr 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part IX

In 1542 the manuscript of De revolutionibusarrived at Petreius’ printing office in Nürnberg followed by Rheticus who intended to see it through the press. I argued in Part VII that Johannes Petreius had in fact commissioned Rheticus to see...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Apr 2019

Review: Katharine Gerbner, Christian Slavery: Conversion and Race in the Protestant Atlantic World

On the heels of its recent release in paperback, today The Junto features a review of Christian Slavery: Conversion and Race in the Protestant Atlantic World (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018). Stay tuned tomorrow for an interview with the author,...
From: The Junto on 18 Apr 2019

Renaissance Heavy Metal

One of the most fascinating and spectacularly illustrated Renaissance books on science and technology is De re metallica by Georgius Agricola (1494–1555). Translated into English the author’s name sounds like a figure from a game of happy...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 17 Apr 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part VIII

We left Georg Joachim Rheticus[1](1514–1574) just setting out on his journey from Feldkirch to Frombork for what would turn out to be one of the most fateful meetings in the history of science. Our wealthy professor of mathematics travelled in style...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 10 Apr 2019

Funding Research & Writing in Renaissance Drama, Vol. 4

A Blogroll in Five Acts Part of the experience of being an early-career researcher includes learning how to transition from graduate student to scholar and peer. While much of the advice about this transition centers around issues of self-presentation,...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 2 Apr 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part VI

Copernicus first put his concept for a heliocentric cosmos in writing in a manuscript that today bears the title Nicolai Copernici de hypothesibus motuum coelestium a se constitutis commentariolus (roughly translated: Nicolas Copernicus’ short...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 14 Mar 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part IV

There is general agreement amongst historians of science that a major factor in the emergence of modern science in general and modern astronomy in particular was the (re)invention of moveable type printing and the arrival of the printed book in the middle...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Feb 2019

An important 13th-century book on optics

The thirteenth-century Silesian friar and mathematician Witelo is one of those shadowy figures in the history of science, whose influence was great but about whom we know very little. Page from a manuscript of Perspectiva with a miniature of the author...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 13 Feb 2019

Around the Table: Publisher Chat

Welcome to the first Publisher Chat as part of our new series, Around the Table, in which I will occasionally be talking to editors and publishers of journals and book series dealing with topics related to historic recipes. Today I am chatting with Allen...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Feb 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part II

Before we progress we need to take stock and deal with a couple of points that came up in a comment to Part I. This series is about the factors that led to the emergence of heliocentricity in Europe in the Early Modern Period. It doesn’t deal with...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 30 Jan 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part I

I have recently been involved in more that one exchange on the subject as to what tipped the scales in favour of heliocentricity against geocentricity in the Early Modern Period. People have a tendency to want to pin it down to one crucial discovery,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 23 Jan 2019

Christmas Trilogy 2018 Part 3: Johannes’ battle with Mars

It would be entirely plausible to claim the Johannes Kepler’s Astronomia Nova was more important to the eventual acceptance of a heliocentric view of the cosmos than either Copernicus’ De revolutionibus or Galileo’s Sidereus...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Dec 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.