The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Quincy"

Showing 1 - 20 of 97

Your search for posts with tags containing Quincy found 97 posts

“I have many anxious hours for Charles”

In early 1789, as I’ve been chronicling, Charles Adams had a couple more run-ins with the authorities of Harvard College. Even though those incidents didn’t appear on the official faculty minutes or Charles’s permanent record, word got...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Sep 2019

“A snow ball was sent against the chapel windows”

As I wrote back here, in December 1788 Harvard professor Eliphalet Pearson began to keep a “Journal of disorders &c.” It’s possible Pearson had assembled a similar notebook previously and it just doesn’t survive. But I think...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Sep 2019

“Perswaded that Charles did not deserve the suspicions”

The Harvard College Thanksgiving banquet in November 1787 ended badly. By the evening, window glass and wooden benches were lying on the ground outside the hall. That might have had something to do with how every student had brought a bottle of wine.The...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Sep 2019

“Charles has been guilty of a trick”

On 26 May 1786, John Adams wrote from London to his eldest son, congratulating John Quincy Adams on getting into Harvard College: Give me leave to congratulate you on your Admission into the Seat of the Muses, our dear Alma Mater, where I hope you will...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Sep 2019

Sorting Out the Adams Boys at Harvard

I started my look at Charles Adams’s experience at Harvard College with a posting on how his aunts clustered around and made sure he had furniture for his dorm room. (His parents were far off in Britain.)It’s only natural then to wonder how...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Sep 2019

The Adams Brothers at Harvard College

For a year in the late 1780s, all three sons of John and Abigail Adams were students at Harvard College.The first to enter was the middle son, Charles, born in 1770. I described the many little challenges of equipping him for dormitory life in the summer...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Sep 2019

On the Night Before the Powder Alarm

Yesterday we left Esther Sewall in her house in rural Cambridge on the night of 1 Sept 1774.Sewall had two young sons. Her husband, attorney general Jonathan Sewall, had gone into Boston that morning. The household also included a couple of law students...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2019

Attack on Jonathan Sewall’s House

On 1 Sept 1774, Gen. Thomas Gage sent soldiers out to Charlestown to remove the provincial militia’s supply of gunpowder from the stone tower that still stands in what is now Somerville.Some of Gage’s troops went on into Cambridge and wheeled...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Sep 2019

Moving into a Harvard Dormitory in 1785

At this time of year young people are settling in at college, including my godson at Cambridge. So I’m looking at the process of entering college in 1785.Fifteen-year-old Charles Adams started at Harvard College that year. His parents, Abigail and...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2019

Memories of “Mr. Balch’s Mimickry”

As I detailed yesterday, Nathaniel Balch (shown here, courtesy of Balchipedia) was a hatter. But at heart he was an entertainer, known across Boston for his humor and charm.When Josiah Quincy, Jr., was traveling in the southern colonies on 6 Mar 1773,...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Aug 2019

“The unsubstantial fabric of visionary politicians”

Given that John Quincy Adams’s first comment on the idea of a hollow Earth was decidedly skeptical and negative, how did modern writers come to believe he supported the theory as President?I think one key may lie in how Adams referred to the theory...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jul 2019

“Travelling within the nutshell of the earth”?

Yesterday I described how John Cleves Symmes, Jr., a retired army captain and failed trader, was struck with the theory that the Earth was hollow, with holes at the poles. Symmes started promulgating that idea in April 1818. The growing American press...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jul 2019

“I declare the earth is hollow and habitable within”

This episode of the Timesuck podcast, this History Daily article, this Cracked article, this 13th Floor article, and this History Extra roundup of Presidential trivia all tell the same story.That story says President John Quincy Adams was convinced by...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jul 2019

The Day Nôtre Dame Cathedral Hosted Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and King Louis XVI

1785 was a rare year in Paris—it was safely nestled between revolutions. The American Revolution had come to an official end right there in... The post The Day Nôtre Dame Cathedral Hosted Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and King Louis XVI appeared...

Di Spigna on Dr. Joseph Warren in the Coming Week

Christian Di Spigna, author of Founding Martyr: The Life and Death of Dr. Joseph Warren, the American Revolution’s Lost Hero is making another swing through New England with book talks and signings.These events coincide with the conjunction of the...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jun 2019

Josiah Quincy, Jr.

Josiah Quincy, Jr.’s name is rarely mentioned in history books. This is because his name never appeared at the top of any leaderboard, that... The post Josiah Quincy, Jr. appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Somos on the “State of Nature" in Boston and Quincy

Mark Somos, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Fellow and Senior Research Affiliate at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg, is visiting the Boston area this week to speak about his book American States...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 May 2019

Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian: the War Begins, 1775

By the end of 1774, Catharine Macaulay had met Benjamin Rush, Arthur Lee, Richard Marchant, and Benjamin Franklin, and had corresponded with John Dickinson, James... The post Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian: the War...

John Adams and “the important Secret”

John Adams’s diary offers a case study of how well the Massachusetts Whigs kept the secrets that Benjamin Franklin asked Thomas Cushing to keep. Adams received the “Collection of Seventeen Letters” on 22 March 1773. Since he was no longer...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Apr 2019

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By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.