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Search Results for "Rachel"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Rachel found 87 posts

Twenty Book suggestions with Annotations from the Jane Austen’s World’s Writing Team

Inquiring readers: The lists in this blog post describe us (Vic, Rachel, Brenda, and Tony) and our interests to a tee. If we were to remove our names heralding our choices, you could probably guess who chose which list. The books mentioned are those that...
From: Jane Austen's World on 31 Jan 2021

Alexander Hamilton’s Missing Years: New Discoveries and Insights into the Little Lion’s Caribbean Childhood

Alexander Hamilton’s life has been documented extensively and his exploits as an adult are well known. His early childhood, however, has long been a... The post Alexander Hamilton’s Missing Years: New Discoveries and Insights into the Little...

Formally Introducing the Jane Austen’s World Blog Team! by Vic Sanborn

Inquiring readers, I’m pleased to formally announce my new Jane Austen’s World (JAW) partners, who will help me oversee this blog. Regular readers are already acquainted with the contributions of Tony Grant, Rachel Dodge, and Brenda Cox. This...
From: Jane Austen's World on 8 Aug 2020

The Jane Austen Society: An Interview with Natalie Jenner By Rachel Dodge

It is my pleasure to introduce to you author Natalie Jenner and her debut novel, The Jane Austen Society. Let’s begin with a description of the novel to whet your literary appetites: One hundred and fifty years ago, Chawton was the final home of...
From: Jane Austen's World on 25 May 2020

New Book: “Women & Community in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia”

Women and Community in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia, Michelle Armstrong-Partida, Alexandra Guerson, and Dana Wessell Lightfoot, eds (Nebraska, 2020). Introduction: Contextualizing Women, Agency, and Communities in Premodern Iberia, Michelle Armstrong-Partida,...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 13 May 2020

Staying Home With Jane, by Rachel Dodge

Inquiring readers: Covid-19 has meant making changes for us and our families, friends, and co-workers world wide. Rachel Dodge wrote this lovely article regarding stay-at-home activities in Jane Austen’s era that are still practiced. I think we...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 May 2020

A Trip to Chawton Cottage by Susan Branch

Inquiring readers, During the Covid-19 lock down, I’ve missed traveling around my country. I intended to go abroad as well, but had to lay those plans aside. The internet affords me a way to satisfy my wanderlust. Today as I e-searched Jane Austen’s...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Apr 2020

Myth vs. History

In a recent NY Times opinion piece Hallie Lieberman laments the persistence, prevalence, and perniciousness of a particular historical myth, i.e., the story of the invention of the vibrator as told in The Technology of Orgasm. The standard story is, according...
From: Darin Hayton on 26 Jan 2020

An Amazing Woman of the Georgian Era: Mrs Rachel Charlotte Williams Biggs

In the eighteenth-century women were largely viewed as subservient, a commodity, a man’s possession, much like their house or dog. An object for men to do with as they saw fit, including – in extreme cases – beating or raping if they...
From: All Things Georgian on 28 Nov 2019

British? Or European?: George III’s dinner table and the taste of the nation, 1788-1801

By Rachel Rich and Lisa Smith If we are what we eat, and the king is the father of the nation, then George III’s menus must have something to tell us about who the British people were at the end of the eighteenth century, as Britain moved from early...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Nov 2019

JASNA AGM Williamsburg – Day 1

After a late start from Baltimore and a nice roadside nap, I arrived in Williamsburg, VA in mid-afternoon. I registered, then made a beeline for the Emporium and promptly spent most of my cash on STUFF. I’ll be bankrupt after three more days of...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 Oct 2019

What We’re Reading This Fall

By Jess Clark The abundance of fantastic historical writing—from insightful social media and blog posts to traditional academic monographs to op eds—means that most of us aren’t lacking interesting things to read. At times, though, I...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Aug 2019

On Paratext, Cookbooks, and No Useless Mouth

By Rachel Herrmann Before I entered the final stages of revising my first book, No Useless Mouth: Waging War and Fighting Hunger in the American Revolution, I had tried for reasons of sanity to compartmentalize the fun food stuff from the work food stuff....
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Aug 2019

Exhibition, Review, & Catalogue: Bartolomé Bermejo

Exhibition: “Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance,” The National Gallery, 12 June-29 Septbmer 2019. Review: Isabelle Kent in Apollo June 25, 2019. Exhibition catalog: Letizia Treves; with contributions by Paul Ackroyd,...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 12 Aug 2019

Kisses and Embraces in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice by Rachel Dodge

Much has been said about proper greetings, curtsies, nods, and bows in Jane Austen’s novels, but familiar greetings that occur between close friends and family members are just as fascinating. In fact, a close inspection of the novels reveals more...
From: Jane Austen's World on 30 Jun 2019

Maine’s Favorite Daughter and Blueberries

By Harley Rogers The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Maine. Members represent a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, folklore, anthropology,...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 May 2019

Reviews in the March 2019 RQ

Renaissance Quarterly 72/1 (2019): Javier Lorenzo reviews A Maturing Market: The Iberian Book World in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century, Alexander S. Wilkinson and Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo, eds, (Brill, 2017). Catherine Ballériaux reviews...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 16 Apr 2019

Sir Hugh Plat’s Delights for Ladies (1617) and Closet for Ladies (1618)

This remarkable hand-sized limp vellum sammelband (BEIN 2005 970) bears the signatures of four early female bookowners (Ellenor Hatcher, Rachel Dando, Rachel Wilson, Sarah Baylie) and records payment to a fifth woman (Mistress Carter). The volume contains...

Spanish Panels at the ASECS Conference: Denver, March 21-23 2019

These are the panels of interest to us at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, held in Denver, March 21-23, 2019: Thursday 11:30 am-1:00 pm 36. The Black Legend in the Eighteenth Century I [Ibero-American Society...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 28 Feb 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.