The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Radicalism"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Radicalism found 46 posts

Review: Alexander Kaufman’s “Jack Cade Rebellion of 1450: A Sourcebook” (2019)

By Stephen Basdeo Alexander L. Kaufman, ed. The Jack Cade Rebellion of 1450: A Sourcebook. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2020. (xii), 257pp. ISBN 978-1-4985-5029-1. £65 (RRP) As the several endorsements on the rear cover of Alexander Kaufman’s...

Joseph Ritson the Radical

By Stephen Basdeo Joseph Ritson was born in Stockton-on-Tees in 1752 to a poor yeoman family. As a child, he attended the local Unitarian Sunday School where his talents intellectual talents were noticed, which led him to being apprenticed to a conveyancer...

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

Robin Hood of the Anti-Corn Law League

By Stephen Basdeo While physical archival research remains the “bread and butter” of the work of any historian, the rise of online repositories of primary sources have proved to be of invaluable use to many a historian over the years. This...

Thomas Cooper’s “Prison Rhyme” (1845)

By Stephen Basdeo I recently came into possession of a book written by Thomas Cooper (1805-92), a famous Chartist activist, which he gave to his friend, the newspaper proprietor and fellow Chartist, John Cleave (1790-1847). Chartism was the first large-scale...

Book Preview: Mysticism and Millenarianism

This blog post discusses elements of Chapter 5 of my forthcoming book due out in April 2019. You can find out more about the monograph here. The end of the seventeenth century in England witnessed a heightened belief in the imminent second coming of Christ....
From: Theosophical Transactions on 15 Apr 2019

Book Preview: Mysticism vs Rationality

This blog post discusses elements of Chapter 4 of my forthcoming book due out in April 2019. You can find out more about the monograph here. One of the most substantial discussions of mysticism in seventeenth century England concerned its apparent incompatibility...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 9 Apr 2019

The Chartist Robin Hood: The Poems of W. J. Linton (1812–97)

By Stephen Basdeo During the 1830s, in spite of the passage of the ‘great’ Reform Act (1832), most working men could not vote, while women did not enter the equation at this point. So, in 1836, six working men and six MPs drew up a list of...

Book Preview: Puritan Mysticism

This blog post discusses elements of Chapter 2 of my forthcoming book due out in April 2019. You can find out more about the monograph here. The phrase ‘Puritan mysticism’ has caused many scholars colossal headaches. Firstly, what exactly...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 1 Apr 2019

The Politics of Victorian England’s “Vicious Republican”: G. W. M. Reynolds (1814–79)

By Stephen Basdeo It’s quite possible that you’ve never heard of George William MacArthur Reynolds (1814–79). His prolific writing career has been overshadowed somewhat by his contemporaries such as Charles Dickens, whose writings, while...

EMoDiR’s new Routledge series

The Research Group in Early Modern Religious Dissents and Radicalism is launching its new series with Routlege, https://emodir.hypotheses.org/emodir-routledge-series, a welcome addition on the publishing scence for all scholars working on early-modern...
From: Dissenting Experience on 3 Jan 2019

Religion and radicalism in Western Culture, 1700 to present

The History Research Centre at Manchester Metropolitan University, in conjunction with the Centre for the Study of Apocalyptic and Millennial Movements, invites submissions for a one-day symposium on “Religion and Radicalism”, to be held on...
From: Dissenting Experience on 27 Dec 2018

Mike Leigh’s “Peterloo” (2018)

Reviewed by Stephen Basdeo As a fan of English radical history (did I mention I once wrote a book about Wat Tyler?), I was really looking forward to Mike Leigh’s Peterloo (2018). For the first time I’d see a visual representation of the infamous...

The Political House that Jack Built on Creamware

    William Hone’s The Political House that Jack Built was arguably one of the most influential pieces of political satire published in Britain during the early nineteenth-century. First published in December 1819, during the...
From: The Print Shop Window on 16 Sep 2018

Blind Justice in Eugene Sue’s “The Mysteries of Paris” (1842–3)

By Stephen Basdeo In the 19 June 1842, issue of the Parisian magazine, Journal des Debats, a new serialised novel appeared entitled The Mysteries of Paris, which ran weekly until 15 October 1843. The novel was written by Eugene Sue (1804-57),...

Conference Report: Early Modern Political Thought and Twenty-First Century Politics, 16th May 2018

Recently I was fortunate enough to attend an evening workshop at the Lit & Phil Library, Newcastle. The goal of the session was to explore what early-modern thinkers had to say on the themes of popular mobilisation, toleration, environmentalism...
From: Theosophical Transactions on 29 May 2018

An English Republican’s View of Crime and its Causes

By Stephen Basdeo George William MacArthur Reynolds (1814-79) was one of the Victorian era’ most prolific novelists. Inspired by Eugene Sue’s Mysteries of Paris (1843), Reynolds’s famous The Mysteries of London (1844-46) shined a light...

Reform Act Banner c.183

Here’s something you don’t see every day. It’s a hand-drawn political banner advocating the cause of parliamentary reform. It was probably produced during the early part of 1832. We can be reasonably sure of this because the image was...
From: The Print Shop Window on 13 Dec 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.