The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Religion found 886 posts

Miskitu Moravians in Mesoamerica: Indigeneity, Faith, and Revolution in the 1980s

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Emily Snyder Somewhere in Nicaragua, there are forty lost...
From: Age of Revolutions on 17 Feb 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part 4

Here are answers to the final questions from the Great 1770 Quiz.X. Match the following men to their experience of tarring and feathering in 1770.1) John Adams2) Robert Auchmuty3) Henry Barnes 4) Theophilus Lillie 5) Patrick McMaster6) William Molineux...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Feb 2020

Anáhuac & Rome: Converging Indigeneity and Religiosity in Mexico’s Republican Moment

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Arturo Chang After having read Fray Servando Teresa de...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Feb 2020

“Pointing to Mr. Jacksons Shop”

On Thursday, 8 Feb 1770, two and half centuries ago today, the Boston Whigs tried a new tactic in their pressure campaign against shopkeepers who were still selling imported goods. According to the anonymous witness sending reports to Customs Collector...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Feb 2020

Simon Patrick, The Parable of a Pilgrim (1667)

This devotional work was written by Simon Patrick, a theologian and author of many works of biblical commentary. He eventually became Bishop of Ely. A woman named Sarah Barnes (?) wrote her name on the title page of the work, as we often see with names...

African Americans and the Problems of Faith in the Age of Revolutions

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By James Sidbury The play on words embedded in the title...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Feb 2020

Islam and the Revolutionary Age

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Ian Coller On 2 Floréal of the year III (21 April...
From: Age of Revolutions on 27 Jan 2020

St. Philomena(‘s) Remains: Religion, Sentiment, and Patriarchy Undermined in Post-Revolutionary France

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Jennifer Popiel The bones of Saint Philomena were discovered...
From: Age of Revolutions on 20 Jan 2020

Glimpses of Early Blandford

As long as we’re out in Blandford with Henry Knox, we might as well enjoy the town’s eighteenth-century history.Most of the first British settlers in the area were Scotch-Irish, moving west in a bunch from Hopkinton in 1736. They named their...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jan 2020

Revolution and Counterrevolution Among the Methodists in Early Nineteenth Century British North America

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Todd Webb By the time the American Revolution ended in...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Jan 2020

Newberry Library Graduate Student Conference

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is hosting its annual Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference on 23-25 January 2020. Here is the announcement from the Center for Renaissance Studies: CRS announces the schedule for the...

Pilgrim Mary Brewster (c1569-1627) arrived on The Mayflower

Mary Brewster (c 1569-1627) was a Pilgrim & one of the women on the Mayflower.  She was the wife of Elder William Brewster.Mary Brewster & her husband William married in 1592 & had their first son Jonathan in Scrooby a year later. She...
From: 17th-century American Women on 10 Jan 2020

Biography - 1708 Husband Rules Children & Wife - Virginia - Ann Walker

.Ann Walker's Fight To Attend ChurchIn 1708, Ann Keith Walker (1637- a 1708) appeared before the all male Royal Governor and Council in Williamsburg, Virginia, in a continuing dispute between her and George Walker (c1640-1732), her husband, over...
From: 18th-century American Women on 8 Jan 2020

Twelfth Night in Occupied Boston

On Friday, 6 Jan 1775, the Boston merchant John Andrews reported:This morning we had quite a novel sight. The Sailors belonging to the Transports [i.e., the ships that had brought army regiments to Boston] consisting of about 30 or 40 dress’d in...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jan 2020

A Voice against “the sanguinary vampyres”

As I wrote yesterday, on 1 Apr 1765 the Boston Evening-Post ran a front-page article about vampires cribbed from an account of traveling in Germany published twenty years before. The Fleet brothers could have picked up that item from the Connecticut Courant....
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Jan 2020

Vampire Reports in Colonial American Newspapers

The March 1732 issue of The Gentleman’s Magazine in London carried this news in its Foreign Advices section: “From Medreyga in Hungary, That certain dead Bodies called Vampyres, had kill’d several Persons by sucking out all their Blood.”...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jan 2020

Mrs. Nathaniel Balch and Family

On 15 July 1758, the young lawyer Robert Treat Paine referred in his diary to Molly Fletcher. On other pages around that time he wrote about Mary, Molly, Miss Fletcher, and “Miss Molly.” He was quite interested.The editors of Paine’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Dec 2019

“On Christmas-Day” in Fredericksburg

Sometime between 1745 and 1747, just a few years after the Gentleman’s Magazine published Elizabeth Teft’s poem “On Christmas-Day” (quoted yesterday), a teenager in Virginia copied it into a notebook. That teenager was George Washington,...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Dec 2019

“And with officious joy the scene attend!”

In February 1743, the Gentlemen’s Magazine published this religious poem:ON CHRISTMAS-DAY.ASSist me, muse divine! to sing the morn, On which the saviour of mankind was born; But oh! what numbers to the theme can rise? Unless kind Angels aid me from...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Dec 2019

A “Publick Notice” about Christmas and Its Real Source

This image gets a lot of circulation this time of year, supposedly illustrating Puritan New England’s laws against celebrating Christmas. Often it’s attached to the year 1660.It’s been featured on Mass Moments and other websites. And...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Dec 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.