The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Religion"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Religion found 1000 posts

Missel Romain (1692)

The lovely binding on this Roman Missal looks to be original, dating from the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century. The decorative tooling and raised bands on the spine are heightened with gold, but the book shows signs of use, as we can see...

“Mentor” Remembers the Massacre

Before February ends, I need to note one event from this month 250 years ago.On 11 Feb 1771, the Fleet brothers’ Boston Evening-Post ran as its first front-page item a letter signed “Mentor.” It recalled the previous year’s Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Feb 2021

A Recipe for Music: Notating Domestic Singing in Seventeenth-Century England

By Sarah Koval Mary Chantrell and others, recipe book, f.92v, 1690, MS 1548. Image credit: Wellcome Library, London. Mary Chantrell’s book of recipes for food and medicines (1690) is typical of the manuscript recipe genre: a handwritten, bound book...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Feb 2021

Exits, Entries and the Allure of the Runaway Nun

Guest post by Gwen Seabourne, 17 February 2021. Entries on the rolls of judicial sessions in Yorkshire in 1304 and 1306 tell tales of disturbing events at two of the county’s convents. Representatives of Barkston Ash and the Ainsty informed...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 17 Feb 2021

Review: Anatomy of a Massacre

Anatomy of a Massacre: The Destruction of Gnadenhutten, 1782 by Eric Sterner (Yardley, PA: Westholme Publishing, 2020) Eric Sterner’s Anatomy of a Massacre: The Destruction... The post Review: Anatomy of a Massacre appeared first on Journal...

Richard Allestree, The Gentlemans Calling (1696), The Ladies Calling (1700), and The Lively Oracles Given to Us, or, The Christians Birth-Right and Duty (1696)

The anonymously published The Gentlemans Calling (1660) and The Ladies Calling (1673) were advertised on the title page as written by the same author as the tremendously popular The Whole Duty of Man (1657); all three, along with The Lively Oracles (1678)...

“The First BIBLE ever printed in America”?

As I quoted yesterday, Isaiah Thomas grew up as an apprentice printer hearing stories about how his master, Zechariah Fowle, had helped to secretly print a New Testament in the late 1740s. Thomas also heard about a complete Bible completed by another...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Feb 2021

London Imprints on Boston Bibles?

In 1756 the Boston Overseers of the Poor indentured Isaiah Thomas as an apprentice to the printer Zechariah Fowle (1724-1776). He was seven years old and didn’t yet know how to read. Isaiah’s father had died, and his mother apparently felt...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2021

Surviving an Execution in Medieval England and Modern Ohio: Miracle, or Incompetence?

Posted by Sara M. Butler; 5 February 2021. In Ohio, Governor DeWine’s landmark 8 December 2020 press conference has left the future of felony execution in the state up in the air. The indefinite delay in capital punishment announced back in 2018...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 5 Feb 2021

The Records of Congregationalists of Color

Under the project title of “New England’s Hidden Histories,” the Congregational Library and Archives has been digitizing the records of early churches and related documents. The library has just announced the publication of a finding...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Feb 2021

Book of Common Prayer (1699)

The Book of Common Prayer used by the Church of England was first drafted by Archbishop Thomas Cranmer and published in 1549, marking the break with the older Latin Catholic rite. According to the Act of Uniformity passed that year, it was to be used...

Anne Rossignol, Madame Dumont, and Dr. John Schmidt Junior: Community and Accommodation in Charleston, South Carolina, 1790 – 184

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Suzanne Krebsbach In 1857, physician John...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Feb 2021

Coustumier et directoire pour les soeurs religieuses (1637)

The Sisters of the Visitation of Mary were an order of nuns founded in seventeenth-century France by Jeanne Françoise de Chantal. Born in 1572 to the Frémyot family of Dijon, at the age of twenty she married Christophe du Rabutin, Baron...

Land Grants, Religious Exemptions, and Aid on the Ground: The Role of Local Government in the Resettlement of Loyalist Refugees after the American Revolution

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Alexandra Mairs-Kessler                        ...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Jan 2021

John Howe, The Blessedness of the Righteous Opened, and the Vanity of This Mortal Life (1673)

The Blessed of the Righteous Opened (originally published 1668), bound here with The Vanity of This Mortal Life, is a religious tract by the Presbyterian minister and former chaplain to Cromwell, John Howe (1630-1705). He could not agree to the settlement...

A “very Cheerfull” Christmas at the Rowes’

The merchant John Rowe was one of Boston’s leading Anglicans, so he celebrated Christmas while his Congregationalist neighbors generally ignored the holiday. Here’s how Rowe described 25 Dec 1770 in his published diary, 250 years ago today:...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Dec 2020

Sentenced and Punished for the Boston Massacre

The 17 Dec 1770 Boston Gazette reported on the third trial for the Boston Massacre by naming all the defendants and concluding, “After a few Hours Trial, they were acquitted.”Unlike that same day’s Boston Evening-Post, the Gazette said...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Dec 2020

Call for Papers on Phillis Wheatley (Peters)

Early American Literature will publish a special issue on the poet Phillis Wheatley, later called Phillis Peters. Here is the call for papers from the editors of this issue. The recognition that Phillis Wheatley (Peters) is a significant figure in early...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Dec 2020

Call for Papers on “Underrepresented Voices of the American Revolution”

The Massachusetts Historical Society and Suffolk University issued this call for papers for a July 2020 conference with the theme “Underrepresented Voices of the American Revolution”:In recent decades, scholars have unearthed and revived stories...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Dec 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.