The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Religion"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Religion found 974 posts

Whatever Happened to Jesse Saville?

On 7 Apr 1770, acting governor Thomas Hutchinson sent the Massachusetts General Court documents from Essex County justices of the peace describing the previous month’s mobbing of Jesse Saville. Hutchinson said Saville “had been most inhumanly...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Nov 2020

The Departures of the Rev. Mr. Mosley

On Easter in 1772, as I described yesterday, Trinity Church of Pomfret, Connecticut, formally set up its governing structure.The minister was the Rev. Richard Mosley, a Cambridge University graduate and former Royal Navy chaplain. The man who had founded...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Nov 2020

Settling the Rev. Mr. Mosley in Pomfret

When the Rev. Richard Mosley arrived in Pomfret, Connecticut, in September 1771, asking about the need for an Anglican minister, Godfrey Malbone was cautious. He certainly needed a minister for the little church he had designed and built himself. For...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Nov 2020

“Proceeding from the small share of light that is within us”

So you want to read the “instrument” that Godfrey Malbone composed for the committee of Congregationalists who came to his house in February 1772, questioning the credentials of his new Anglican minister, Richard Mosley? The statement that...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Nov 2020

David Dickson, A Brief Explication of the First Fifty Psalms (1655)

This book bundles together three volumes in which Scottish Minister and Theologian David Dickson (c. 1583–1663) offers his commentary on the psalms, including A Brief Explication of the First Fifty Psalms, A Brief Explication of the Other Fifty...

The Committee and Colonel Malbone

When Godfrey Malbone of Pomfret, Connecticut, set up an Anglican church and arranged for the Rev. Richard Mosley to preach there in the fall of 1771, that wasn’t just a matter of religious freedom.It was also a financial matter. Malbone had been...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Nov 2020

A Church in Pomfret, Connecticut

When Cmdre. James Gambier sailed his flagship Salisbury back to Britain in August 1771, he left behind the ship’s chaplain, the Rev. Richard Mosley.I’m still not sure why, but Mosley had decided to seek a post as an Anglican minister in New...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Nov 2020

“I would hope that you are the Sons of Liberty from principle”

I want to highlight the web version of Jordan E. Taylor’s Early American Studies article “Enquire of the Printer: The Slave Trade and Early American Newspaper Advertising.”Produced using ArcGIS’s Storymaps platform, the article...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Nov 2020

Rev. Richard Mosley and the Boylston-Molineux Marriage

A couple of days ago, I mentioned the Rev. Richard Mosley, chaplain of H.M.S. Salisbury. He wrote about Capt. Thomas Preston’s trial for murder.Mosley’s presence may help in the quest to answer one of the vexing genealogical mysteries of pre-Revolutionary...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Nov 2020

“Lost Holiday” Online Talk, 5 Nov.

On Thursday, 5 November, I’ll speak via Boston by Foot on the topic “Lost Holiday: How Colonial Boston Celebrated the Fifth of November.”Our event description: The 5th of November was a milestone in the annual calendar for the youth...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Oct 2020

Ebenezer Storer, at Your Service

In December 1774, a few months after Hannah (Quincy) Lincoln’s husband Bela died, a Boston merchant named Ebenezer Storer was also widowed.Storer appears here in a pastel portrait rendered by John Singleton Copley in the late 1760s, now at the Metropolitan...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2020

“Stop, here is the empire of death”

Ancient Romans buried their dead outside city walls to avoid contamination.  Medieval Christians, in contrast, kept their dead close, in churchyards or even within church walls, in crypts below the nave or entombed in the floor.  Later, elaborate...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Oct 2020

Drinking the Ink of Prayer

By Genie Yoo  [1] Sometimes historians dream of moments of recognition in the manuscripts they encounter. The act of reading or reciting, writing or copying, can trigger a distant memory, allowing one to draw a line connecting two seemingly unrelated...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Oct 2020

John Preston, Life Eternal (1631)

By David Pearson Inscription of Elizabeth Brooke, from the front flyleaf of her copy of John Preston’s Life Eternal (1631) Up and down the country, in early modern Britain, the houses of the better-off contained books. Our knowledge of...

How to Teach about Violence in France

In the wake of the horrific murder of history teacher Samuel Paty, historians are grappling with how to teach students and the public about the history of violence in France. Paty taught history and geography at a collège (middle school) in...

The Last Years of Parson Wibird

To answer yesterday’s question, the Rev. Anthony Wibird, minister of the north precinct of Braintree (which became Quincy) never married.Even as he discussed marriage with the parson as another young man attracted to Hannah Quincy, John Adams may...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Oct 2020

A Portrait of Parson Wibird

In the letter discussed yesterday, Mary Cranch wrote that she learned the news that “mrs P——l——r was brought to Bed” with a mysterious new baby from “mr wibird.”That was the Rev. Anthony Wibird (1729-1800),...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Oct 2020

William Penn, et al., The Harmony of Divine and Heavenly Doctrines (1696)

In April 2019, we featured a collection of Quaker George Fox’s writings once in the possession of female members of the Steevens family. Today, we highlight another book of Quaker writings owned by a woman. The name “Hannah Dink” is...

The Big News in Boston 250 Years Ago

On 1 Oct 1770, 250 years ago today, the Boston Gazette ran three major pieces of news. The first item came from Philadelphia, where on 12 September a group of seventeen merchants had published a public letter saying:Many of the inhabitants of this City,...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Oct 2020

“Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather” Program, 1 Oct.

On Thursday, 1 October, I’ll be part of an online discussion through the Freedom Forum on “Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather: Race, Religion, and the Press in Colonial America.” The Freedom Forum’s description says:The third program...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Sep 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.