The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Religion"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Religion found 658 posts

Moravians in the Middle: The Gnadenhutten Massacre

In 1782, six months after Cornwallis’ surrender at Yorktown, Patriot militiamen committed one of the most heinous war crimes of the Revolutionary War. On... The post Moravians in the Middle: The Gnadenhutten Massacre appeared first on Journal of...

The French Rural Revolution 1789-1793

By Jorge Sánchez Morales When Louis XVI failed to reconcile the Estates General during the séance royale of June 23, 1789, the expectations for reform held by a large part of French...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Jan 2018

Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library

I am pleased that several of my former graduate students are participating in this week’s Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference, sponsored by the Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library. “The Center for Renaissance...

Guest Post: Review of Farrelly, Anti-Catholicism in America, 1620-186

Today’s guest poster, William S. Cossen, is an Atlanta-based historian of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States, specializing in the intersection of religion and nationalism. He serves as the book review editor for H-SHGAPE (Society...
From: The Junto on 23 Jan 2018

1698 Puritan leader Cotton Mather (1663-1728) on Native Americans in The Story of Squanto

Cotton Mather 1663-1728"The Story of Squanto" from 1698 Magnalia Christi Americana by Cotton MatherA most wicked shipmaster being on this coast a few years before, had wickedly spirited away more than twenty Indians; whom having enticed...
From: 17th-century American Women on 18 Jan 2018

1644 Roger Williams' Plea for Religious Liberty

A PLEA FOR RELIGIOUS LIBERTY by Roger WilliamsRoger WilliamsRoger Williams (ca. 1603-83), religious leader and one of the founders of Rhode Island, was the son of a well-to-do London businessman. Educated at Cambridge (A.B., 1627) he became a clergyman...
From: 17th-century American Women on 12 Jan 2018

When Was the British New Year Begin Before 1752?

The earliest examples of a poetic address from colonial American newspaper carriers to their customers on New Year’s Day are all from the fast-growing city of Philadelphia. The first three date from the years 1720-22. No broadsides of those addresses...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jan 2018

Cultures of Voting in Pre-Modern Europe

I am happy to report that my latest publication has been released, just in time for the new year.  Happy 2018! My chapter on “Municipal elections and contested religious space: electoral practices and confessional politics in Mediterranean...

1640 Preface to the Bay Psalm Book

Preface to the 1640 "Bay Psalm Book" Probably written by Richard MatherRichard Mather Born in Lancashire, England, 1596. Died in Dorchester, Mass. 1669The singing of Psalms, though it breath forth nothing but holy harmony, and melody: yet such is the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 2 Jan 2018

The 1637 Massachusetts Trial of Mother & Religious Troublemaker Anne Hutchinson 1591-1643

Anne Hutchinson was born in 1591, in England. She immigrated with her husband to the Massachusettes Bay Colony in 1634, and was banished from it in 1637. She and her husband had 10 children. She died from an Indian raid in 1643.Anne Hutchinson challenged...
From: 17th-century American Women on 31 Dec 2017

Review: THE BRETHREN by Robert Merle

Hankering for fiction set in sixteenth century France? I recently discovered THE FORTUNES OF FRANCE by Robert Merle, a series of thirteen historical novels that span the years 1547 to 1661. Written in French from 1977 to 2003, the books follow the Siorac...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 29 Dec 2017

Book Raffle: Banks and Johnson, The French Revolution and Religion in Global Perspective

Banks, Bryan and Erica Johnson. The French Revolution and Religion in Global Perspective: Freedom and Faith. New York. Palgrave, 2017. In conjunction with Palgrave MacMillan, Bryan Banks, and Erica Johnson, Age of Revolutions is giving...
From: Age of Revolutions on 20 Dec 2017

Religion and the French Revolution: A Global Perspective

By Bryan A. Banks and Erica Johnson The French Revolution, though political, assumed the guise and tactics of a religious revolution. Some further points of resemblance between the two may be noticed. The former not only spread beyond the limits of France,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 18 Dec 2017

Boston in 1774 with Notes from Later

Cortney Skinner alerted me to this item in the New York Public Library’s digital images collection.It’s a leaf from Isaiah Thomas’s Royal American Magazine in early 1774 that featured Paul Revere’s engraving of the eastern shore...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Dec 2017

The Thanksgiving Proclamation at Old South

The controversy over Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s Thanksgiving proclamation in 1771 caused particular trouble in Boston’s largest meetinghouse, the Old South. That church had not had a placid year. In 1769 its minister, the Rev. Samuel Blair,...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Nov 2017

The Proclamation “read in our churches last Sunday”?

The Rev. Dr. Samuel Cooper no doubt had an inside view of the Boston Whigs’ efforts to organize political resistance to Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and his 1771 Thanksgiving proclamation.Indeed, Cooper was probably one of the Boston ministers who came...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Nov 2017

From Freedom of the Press to St Elizabeth Seaton - The complicated life of Elizabeth Becker Curson 1731-1787

1757 Thomas McIlworth (fl 1757-67). Elizabeth Becker (Mrs. Richard Curzon or Curson) 1731-1787.  Elizabeth Rebecca Becker was born into a family of strong women, but she certainly was not born into elite colonial society. Elizabeth Becker was born...
From: 18th-century American Women on 28 Nov 2017

The Governor’s Thanksgiving Proclamation as a “solemn mockery”

By law, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s Thanksgiving proclamation for 1771 was supposed to be read out by the ministers of all the meetinghouses in Massachusetts.That’s why the colony commissioned Richard Draper to print the proclamation in broadside....
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Nov 2017

Why the 1771 Thanksgiving Proclamation Was “Offensive”

So why were Boston’s Whigs so upset about Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s Thanksgiving proclamation for 1771? What was their problem with the phrase about thanking God for having ”continue[d] to them their civil and religious Privileges”?For...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Nov 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.