The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Resources"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Resources found 303 posts

Crime and Women’s Petitions to the post-Restoration Stuart Monarchs

Emily Rhodes [This post examines petitions for mercy from women on behalf of themselves or their male relatives who were accused or convicted of serious crimes. It is written by Emily Rhodes (@elrhodes96), a PhD candidate at Christ’s College, Cambridge.]...

Xavier Salomon on Clodion’s Dance of Time

The Dance of Time, Three Nymphs Supporting a Clock, movement by Jean-Baptiste Lepaute, sculpture by Claude Michel Clodion, 1788, terracotta, gilt brass, and glass, H.: 41 inches (New York: The Frick Collection, bequest of Winthrop Kellogg Edey) Photo:...
From: Enfilade on 1 Jan 2021

New Digital Publication | Art & the Country House

From the Mellon Centre: Martin Postle, ed., Art & the Country House, launched November 2020. Explore the collections of Castle Howard, Doddington Hall, Mells Manor, Mount Stuart, Petworth House, Raynham Hall, Trewithen and West Wycombe through...
From: Enfilade on 30 Nov 2020

Online Exhibition | Participez à la vie des académies d’art

Announcing the exhibition: Participez à la vie des académies d’art… Portes ouvertes de 9 à 90 ans An online exhibition of the ACA-RES programme How were artists and craftsmen trained in French art academies in the age...
From: Enfilade on 16 Nov 2020

British Library Makes 40K Maps and Views Available Online

Matthew Dixon. ‘A General Plan with a Project for the Defence of the Arsenals of Plymouth, / By Lieut: Colonel Dixon Chief Engineer of the Plymouth Division. Revised and corrected by Geo. Beck Jan. 1780.’ (London: British Library, Maps K.Top...
From: Enfilade on 8 Nov 2020

‘Infamus calumniations’, or, a petition goes awry at Rothwell Church, 1603

[This post from Dr Andy Burn (@aj_burn) was previously posted on the Durham History Blog. It examines a dispute about a petition to King James I from a group of tenants against their landlord, showing the danger of taking such complaints at face value...

In Process | Catalogue Raisonné of Porcelain by Lücke

Enfilade doesn’t include a lot of these sorts of notices. It’s nice, however to note who is working on what, and I’m glad to include more. This one comes from ArtHist.net: In Process | Catalog Raisonné, Porcelain by Johann Christoph...
From: Enfilade on 28 Oct 2020

Introducing the Folger Reference Image Collection

Sometimes when people contact the Folger to ask questions about items in our collections, the easiest way to provide an answer is to take a quick photo of a particular detail. This has resulted in a growing collection of smartphone images of collections...
From: The Collation on 13 Oct 2020

Resource: John Howard’s The State of the Prisons

The first comprehensive account of the prison system in England and Wales was John Howard’s “The State of the Prisons”, published in 1777. It went through four editions over fifteen years, each based on his own visits to the gaols, and...
From: Alsatia on 21 Sep 2020

Frazzled much? The challenges of writing fact-based historical fiction

I’ve been stuck for nearly a week over a chapter in the WIP. (The whip, I think ruefully, as I type those letters.) The problem has many causes. One is that I have a stubborn need to know where-the-heck my heroine (Elizabeth Tudor, in this instance)...
From: Baroque Explorations on 19 Sep 2020

Edmund Felton’s petitions for justice, 1621-53

This post by Jason Peacey has also been posted on the UK Parliament ‘Petition of the Month’ blog and draws on petitions transcribed in our newly published volume of petitions to the House of Lords. In 1653, an embittered petitioner called...

‘For signing a Petition … [he] was put into the Stocks’ – Petitioning from within the Debtors’ Prison

Alex Wakelam [This blogpost examines the petitions submitted by prisoners for debt in early modern England, especially their complaints against prison officials. It uses the case from Ludgate Prison in 1710 to show how the limits of such petitioning and...

The petition of Elizabeth Skory: A young woman seeks redress against a powerful man in 1621

This post by Sharon Howard has also been posted on the UK Parliament ‘Petition of the Month’ blog and uses transcriptions from our newly published volume of petitions to the House of Lords. The 1621 Parliament was summoned reluctantly by the...

Damaged & Destroyed, A New Online Feature from PMC

From the Paul Mellon Centre: The online feature, Damaged & Destroyed, focuses on a selection of the damaged and destroyed works that are recorded in the Centre’s photographic archive, and uses them to suggest some of the values and limitations...
From: Enfilade on 14 Aug 2020

The Decorative Arts Trust Meets Capital Campaign Goal

Maureen Marton (center right) was the Decorative Arts Trust Curatorial Intern at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art (MWPAI). Here she evaluated the back of a crazy quilt with MWPAI staff. Photo by Richard Walker Photography. ...
From: Enfilade on 13 Aug 2020

New YouTube Channel | ArtStoryLab

A note from Hyejin Lee: In April, I created a YouTube channel called ArtStoryLab, featuring short videos on various art-historical topics. I have ten episodes so far, and most of them center on 18th-century European art. As the channel grows, I hope...
From: Enfilade on 7 Aug 2020

Decades of manuscript photography on Digital.Bodleian

from Andrew Dunning, R.W. Hunt Curator of Medieval Manuscripts Digital.Bodleian is the online home for Oxford’s special collections in the Bodleian and college libraries. Although it is still relatively new – with a second version coming...
From: The Conveyor on 25 Jun 2020

Call for Participation | Blackness, Immobility, and Visibility, 1600–18

From the Call for Participation: Blackness, Immobility, and Visibility in Europe, 1600–1800 Journal18 | Creating a Collaborative Scholarly Resource Contributions due by 15 August 2020 Hyacinthe Rigaud, Young Black Man Carrying a Bow, 1697, oil...
From: Enfilade on 24 Jun 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.