The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Richard Draper"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Richard Draper found 23 posts

Alarming News from Across the Atlantic

On 21 June 1770, 250 years ago today, the Boston News-Letter reported startling news from London. So startling that Richard Draper added a two-page “Extraordinary” sheet to his newspaper.On Monday the 18th, Capt. James Hall had arrived from...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jun 2020

May 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The other Advertisements must be deferred to next Week.” John Crosby, who sold citrus fruits “at the Sign of the Basket of Lemmons,” and George Spriggs,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 May 2020

“My Eyes never beheld such a funeral”

Yesterday I described how the Boston Whigs prepared for young Christopher Seider’s funeral procession on Monday, 26 Feb 1770. The first newspaper published after that date was the 1 March Boston News-Letter, and it reported on the event this way:a...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Feb 2020

“The first thought was to hang him up at once”

When Ebenezer Richardson fired his musket out of window of his house on 22 Feb 1770, as recounted yesterday, that gun was loaded with “Swan shot.” Those were lead pellets ”about the bigness of large peas”—larger than “Goose...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Feb 2020

“The Effects of Junius’ Letter”?

Throughout 1769, British politics was roiled by a series of public letters signed “Junius,” attacking the ministry of the Duke of Grafton and promoting William Pitt, by then the Earl of Chatham.The letters combined erudite arguments, apparently...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Feb 2020

December 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Induce those Gentlemen who have long been Customers, to renew their Subscription.” Richard Draper, printer of the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News-Letter,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Dec 2019

How Newspapers Covered the Fight at the Clarke House

The fight at the Clarke house on School Street on the night of 17 Nov 1773 offers a good test case of colonial Boston’s highly politicized press.The next morning, Isaiah Thomas’s Massachusetts Spy, a Whig newspaper, put all the blame for the...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Dec 2019

“At length the Gentleman fired a Pistol”

Richard Draper published an issue of the Boston News-Letter on Friday, 26 Nov 1773.That in itself was notable. The News-Letter normally appeared on Thursdays. The one-week change might reflect a flood of news during the tea crisis, or just some difficulty...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Dec 2019

“The general Joy of this City”

On 31 July 1769 the Boston Gazette alerted its readers that Gov. Francis Bernard was leaving Massachusetts at last:HIS EXCELLENCY sir FRANCIS BERNARD, BARONET OF NETTLEHAM IN LINCOLNSHIRE OLD ENGLAND, sails for London the first fair Wind.—NOTE,...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Aug 2019

“The Tendency and Design of the Letters”

On 2 June 1773, the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court listened to a reading of the bundle of letters that Benjamin Franklin had sent from London. The record doesn’t show whether Samuel Adams did the reading as the assembly’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2019

“Soon after the fire broke out, he caused his wind to blow”

Given Boston’s religious heritage, the Great Fire of 1760 naturally caused people to ask what God meant by it. On 23 March, the Sunday after the fire, the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew preached about the calamity at the West Meetinghouse. That sermon said...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2019

“The Occasion of the foregoing Proceedings at New-York”

In November 1768, New York newspapers went back and forth over the accuracy of their reports on an effigy-burning in that city. Remarkably, the effigies were of two royal officials in Massachusetts: Gov. Francis Bernard and Sheriff Stephen Greenleaf....
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Feb 2019

November 28

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Chronicle (November 28, 1768).“Ames’s Almanack for 1769, SOLD by William M‘Alpine in MARLBOROUGH STREET, Boston.” As November came to an end and a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Nov 2018

September 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Postscript to the Boston Weekly News-Letter (September 29, 1768).“The Account contains some Particulars of his robbing Mr Davis’s Shop at Roxbury.” Less than three...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Sep 2018

May 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Massachusetts Gazette (April 28, 1768).“THOSE Advertisements which are omitted will have a very good Place in our next.” Richard Draper inserted a short notice at...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 May 2018

The Mystery of “Mucius Scævola”

Isaiah Thomas’s Massachusetts Spy started to publish the essays of “Mucius Scævola” on 30 May 1771, four months after Joseph Greenleaf advertised his property in Abington for sale. That summer there was a dispute over which Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Dec 2017

The Governor’s Thanksgiving Proclamation as a “solemn mockery”

By law, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s Thanksgiving proclamation for 1771 was supposed to be read out by the ministers of all the meetinghouses in Massachusetts.That’s why the colony commissioned Richard Draper to print the proclamation in broadside....
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Nov 2017

Publishing the 1771 Thanksgiving Proclamation

I’ve been considering Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s Thanksgiving proclamation in 1771, one of the many bones of contention in Revolutionary Boston. Hutchinson’s own account may have been accurate in the basics but it wasn’t in all details,...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Nov 2017

October 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (October 8, 1767).“The Advertisements taking up so much Room, the several Articles intended for this Page are thrown into a SUPPLEMENT.” This notice...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Oct 2017

May 29

What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette Extraordinary (May 29, 1766).Print played a significant role in the coming of the American Revolution. Some scholars argue for the primacy of newspapers in facilitating...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 May 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.