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Search Results for "Road to Concord additions"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Road to Concord additions found 32 posts

New Podcast Interviews

A couple of history conversations I’ve had this fall are available as podcasts for your critical listening.Matt Crawford at the Curious Man’s Podcast and I discussed The Road to Concord. Here’s the Apple link and a direct connection...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2019

The Road to Concord Leads on to Townsend

Tomorrow afternoon I’ll speak about The Road to Concord to the Townsend Historical Society.According to Ithamar B. Sawtelle’s History of the Town of Townsend, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (1878), in that town “The alarm to the minute-men...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Nov 2019

”A Procession that extended near a Mile and a half”

On rereading the Boston Gazette’s description of the Sons of Liberty 14 Aug 1769 dinner this year, I was struck by the detail that three times the men punctuated their toasts with “A Discharge of Cannon.” Perhaps only one cannon, but...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Aug 2019

When the “Powder Alarm” Came to Shrewsbury

Here’s a link to something else I didn’t realize was on the web: video of my Road to Concord presentation in Shrewsbury in January 2018. Chapter 2 of the book begins in that town:While Gen. Gage was arranging to remove the gunpowder from Charlestown,...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Aug 2019

Duncan Ingraham, Justice of the Peace

Yesterday I quoted two depositions of British soldiers taken prisoner on 19 Apr 1775—John Bateman of the 52nd Regiment and James Marr of the 4th.Both depositions were dated 23 April and attested to by the same two justices of the peace: Dr. John...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 May 2019

“Paul Revere never made the midnight ride”?

A lot of legend grew up around the American Revolution in the late 1800s, and Henry W. Longfellow’s poem “Paul Revere’s Ride” made the events of 18-19 Apr 1775 especially famed and susceptible to mythologizing.In the early 1900s...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Apr 2019

“Mr. Adjutant Daws & the Sergeants”

In Paul Revere’s Ride, David Hackett Fischer made an impressive case that Paul Revere had a social network among the Boston Whigs second only to Dr. Joseph Warren.As I’ve delved into the sources myself, I came to see the data that went into...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Apr 2019

“William Dawes’s Secret” in Roxbury, 7 April

On Sunday, 7 April, I’ll speak to the Jamaica Plain Historical Society and the Roxbury Historical Society about “William Dawes’s Secret.” Here’s our event description:William Dawes, Jr., is known today only as the other rider...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Apr 2019

The Rev. Dr. Stiles Ponders When “Dr. Church was wavering”

On 16 Mar 1773, the Rev. Dr. Ezra Stiles of Newport put some Massachusetts news into his diary:At Boston the Sons of Liberty celebrated or commemorating the Anniversary of the Massacre 5th. Inst. [i.e., of this month] when Dr [Benjamin] Church delivered...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Mar 2019

Looking at “Leslie’s Retreat”

Today Salem commemorates “Leslie’s Retreat” on 26 Feb 1775, so I’m highlighting Donna Seger’s Streets of Salem posting about that event. She explores three points, to which I’ll add my thoughts.“How many damn...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Feb 2019

The Powder Alarm Viewed from Westborough

Earlier in the summer I took note of the online edition of the diary of the Rev. Ebenezer Parkman of Westboro. One of the events Parkman lived through and recorded was the “Powder Alarm” of September 1774. In fact, by writing down news at...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Sep 2018

Trail Work at the North Bridge

Minute Man National Historical Park has begun an “extensive rehabilitation” of the North Bridge Trail on the west side of the North Bridge in Concord.Sections of that trail are closed, meaning that there’s no pedestrian access to the...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 May 2018

A Talk, a Video, and Signed Copies of The Road to Concord

On the evening of Thursday, 17 May, I’ll speak at the Bunker Hill Museum on the topic “Meet the New Neighbors: The British Army in Boston, 1768.” This is a Revolution 250 event organized by Boston National Historical Park. Here’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 May 2018

“A meticulously researched study unspoiled by pedantry”

The Journal of the American Revolution has just shared a very nice review of The Road to Concord from the spring 2018 issue of Army History. J. L. Bell’s The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War tackles a familiar...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Apr 2018

Gov. Hancock’s Funeral Procession

At sunrise on Monday, 14 Oct 1793, all the church bells in Boston began to ring. They tolled for an hour in tribute to Gov. John Hancock, who had died the previous Tuesday and was being buried that day. All the flags “in town, at the Castle, and...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Oct 2017

John Adams on the “Hancock” and “Adams”

James Lloyd was born in Boston in December 1769 and named after his grandfather, a respected physician. During the early 1770s, Dr. Lloyd sided with the royal government, but he remained in Boston when the British military evacuated. Eventually he regained...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Oct 2017

“Colonial hijinks, high political drama, and Revolutionary War heroes”

Daniel Ford, author of the upcoming novel Sid Sanford Lives!, wrote a very nice review of my book on the website for the Writers’ Bone podcast. It’s part of a roundup headlined “Books That Should Be on Your Radar”:J.L. Bell...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Aug 2017

“Four Loose Cannons” for Download

Last week I had my post-midnight visit with Bradley Jay at WBZ-AM radio. The conversation was fun and detailed and as coherent as I can be that late at night.That segment of the Jay Talking show is now available as a podcast episode titled “Four...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jul 2017

“The Road to Revolution in Newton,” 11 July

On Tuesday, 11 July, I’ll speak at the Newton Free Library on the topic “The Road to Revolution in Newton.”This will be another talk based on The Road to Concord with a local twist:In September 1774 the farmers of Middlesex County rose...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jul 2017

Questions Raised by Lunenburg’s Cannon

Yesterday’s posting, thanks to Eileen O’Brien, quoted from the town records of Lunenburg as its citizens voted to mount a nine-pounder cannon and then offer it to the provincial army.Of course, the town didn’t make that offer until after...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jun 2017

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