The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Robin Hood Studies"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Robin Hood Studies found 52 posts

“They had never heard of Robin Hood”: Remarks from George Orwell’s “A Clergyman’s Daughter” (1935)

By Stephen Basdeo Robin Hood has on occasion been accused of being a hero who appears mainly in literature for the middle classes. The first ever printed copies of A Gest of Robyn Hode (published in several editions between 1495 and c.1600) were obviously...

Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough and William of Cloudeslie

By Stephen Basdeo Stories of Robin Hood have been popular since at least the late fourteenth century, as we know from William Langland’s Vision of Piers Plowman (c.1377). However, around the same time that the ‘rymes of Robyn Hode’ flourished,...

“Like a faint echo from the Middle Ages”: George Orwell’s Time among the Tramps

By Stephen Basdeo It was the roaring 1920s. After the carnage of the Great War (1914–18), it truly seemed as if Britain was changing for the better in some respects. The old Victorian social mores were eroded; the first Labour government came to...

Joseph Ritson’s Discovery of “Robin Hood and the Monk” (1465)

By Stephen Basdeo While researching my book, Discovering Robin Hood: The Life of Joseph Ritson: Gentleman, Scholar, and Revolutionary, I came across some fascinating information. I give below a snippet from my forthcoming book: In 1795 Joseph Ritson,...

The Working Man’s Robin Hood: The Writings of Allan Cunningham (1784–1842)

By Stephen Basdeo In 1832, the publisher Charles Knight had a bright idea: every Saturday he would publish a new magazine which whose aim was to educate working-class readers about their world. It would not contain news, and would therefore be exempt...

The Life and Work of Victorian Robin Hood Scholar John Mathew Gutch (1776–1861)

By Stephen Basdeo The modern scholarly study of the Robin Hood legend began with the pioneering work of Joseph Ritson who in 1795 published Robin Hood: A Collection of all the Ancient Poems, Songs, and Ballads. Several nineteenth-century novelists, such...

Stephen Basdeo’s “Robin Hood” Radio Segment

As most people know, I’ve spent a significant amount of time researching and writing about the legend of Robin Hood. Having written a Ph.D. thesis on the legend, it was a pleasure to be asked by Jonathan Wright at Pen and Sword books to write a...

Anon. ‘Robin Hood’ (1828)

The following poem, written anonymously and titled simply as ‘Robin Hood’, appeared in The Oriental Observer and Literary Chronicle in 1828. The newspaper, printed in Calcutta during the rule of the East India Company, went through a number...

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

Robin Hood, a Foundling

By Stephen Basdeo As one of England’s most famous historical figures, the name of Robin Hood appears in countless records. The first record we have of a man named Robin Hood is in the York Assize Records for the years 1225–26. This man is...

Sir Robin William V. Harcourt Hood, M. P.

By Stephen Basdeo Whenever a politician proposes raising a new tax or cutting a public service, a newspaper columnist will often respond that the proposed changes are ‘Reverse Robin Hood’. Alternatively, those who look favourably upon governmental...

Reading Robin Hood in World War Two (1939–45): Data from Mass Observation

Before the twentieth century, Robin Hood was a literary figure: he is the main protagonist in a number of important literary works such as A Gest of Robyn Hode (c. 1450); Anthony Munday’s The Downfall of Robert, Earle of Huntington and The Death...

Visions of “Piers Plowman” in the 18th Century

The best thing about having a Robin Hood theme for this blog is that it allows me to legitimately write about both crime and medievalism (medievalism, as opposed to medieval studies, examines how the medieval period has been represented by authors, artists,...

Thomas Dun: A Medieval Pirate & Highwayman

Robin Hood was not the only famous law breaker in medieval times. Alongside Robin Hood were figures such as Adam Bell and the subject of this blog post, the medieval pirate Thomas Dun. When the word ‘pirate’ is mentioned, many people will...

Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The Black Arrow” (1888)

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) is perhaps most famous nowadays for his brilliant novel, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). This post, however, is about a now little-known novel that he authored entitled The Black Arrow, which was...

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