The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Rockingham"

Your search for posts with tags containing Rockingham found 19 posts

The Strange Affair of the King and the Repeal of the Stamp Act

“The King had evidently consented to the repeal, and then disavowed his Ministers.”—Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of King George the Third In... The post The Strange Affair of the King and the Repeal of the Stamp Act appeared first on Journal...

The Abdication(s) of King George III

On April 1, 2015, Queen Elizabeth II announced the creation of the Georgian Papers Programme. It is a ten-year project to transcribe, digitize, conserve,... The post The Abdication(s) of King George III appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Charles Townshend: Architect of the Townshend Duties

The increasingly turbulent years preceding the American Revolution were fueled by an exchange of laws promulgated by Great Britain to maintain political and economic... The post Charles Townshend: Architect of the Townshend Duties appeared first on Journal...

Rockingham, Washington’s Headquarters, 1783

George Washington slept here. After the commander in chief was summoned to Princeton, New Jersey during the summer of 1783, and finding no rooms... The post Rockingham, Washington’s Headquarters, 1783 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

HMS Dido 178

Today I once again welcome back Etienne Daly who has been using the ‘lockdown’ very productively continuing his research into Dido Elizabeth Belle and in particular his eye was drawn to the frigate HMS Dido. So, I’ll hand over to him...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Oct 2020

July 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “At the Sign of the Marquis of Rockingham.” In early July 1770, Thomas Achincloss placed an advertisement in the New-Hampshire Gazette to inform consumers that he sold...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Jul 2020

The Noble Radical: Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond

By Stephen Basdeo On 22 February 1735 Charles Lennox, the Duke of Richmond, and his wife, Sarah Cadogan, welcomed into the world a son, whom they named Charles, after the father. The young Charles received the upbringing that was typical to many of the...

“Volleys of Stones, Brickbats, Sticks or anything else that came to hand”

Yesterday we left Customs Collector Joseph Harrison just after he confiscated the sloop Liberty from John Hancock. He thought he had escaped retaliation from the waterfront crowd. He thought wrong. As laid out on this website titled “Collectors...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jun 2018

The Boston Chronicle “unbiassed by prejudice or party”?

When in October 1767 John Mein and John Fleeming circulated the proposal to publish a new weekly newspaper in Boston, their plan started with a long list of things “their friends” wanted to see in it.That list concluded by quoting those advance...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Dec 2017

The House of Lords Considers the Declaratory Act

The Rockingham government’s strategy to extricate itself from the unenforceable Stamp Act and yet maintain Parliament’s authority was to couple the repeal of that law with the Declaratory Act. That act stated outright that Parliament’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Feb 2016

“The right of representation and taxation always went together”

Having spent a week on the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, I’m going to jump back to 250 years ago and Parliament’s debate over what to do about the Stamp Act. That law was clearly unenforceable in North America. The Marquess of Rockingham’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jan 2016

The Marquess of Rockingham’s Stamp Act Revisions

I’m going to break from the campus debate over revising now-problematic symbols to catch up with developments in 1765 concerning the Stamp Act. When we last left the Marquess of Rockingham, the sudden death of the king’s uncle, the Duke of...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Dec 2015

Meanwhile, in London…

As their anti-Stamp Act campaign got started in the late summer of 1765, American Whigs were heartened by the news from London that Prime Minister George Grenville’s ministry had fallen. This change had nothing to do with the unhappiness in America....
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Oct 2015

Chasing Down an Unsuccessful Suitor

After I read the exchange of letters between Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and William Fitzwilliam on 6 Apr 1771, I decided to track down who this young suitor was.For a long time I was stymied because the most prominent “Lord Fitzwilliam” of the...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Oct 2015

The Day Liberty Tree Got Its Name

Late on Tuesday, 10 Sept 1765, a ship reached Boston from London carrying three items of great political significance: George Meserve, the young gentleman appointed to collect the stamp tax in New Hampshire. One box of stamped papers for him to distribute...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Sep 2015

Hartley and Franklin, Reunited in Paris

I’ve been writing about the on-again, off-again correspondence of Benjamin Franklin and David Hartley, British scientist and Member of Parliament. Their relationship actually turned out to be a factor in the end of the war.After London received news...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Mar 2015

Stamp Act Approved by King, Leading to a Change of Government

On 22 Mar 1765, the Stamp Act for North America received the royal sign-off necessary before becoming law. However, George III never approved the bill. He approved of it, it’s clear, but in March 1765 when the bill reached that stage he was ill and...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Mar 2015

Stamp Act Approved by Lords

On 27 Feb 1765 the House of Commons gave final approval to the new Stamp Act for North America. The bill then moved on to the House of Lords.The North American colonies had some friends in the British peerage, or at least men willing to argue against...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Mar 2015

The Feuding Pearce family

You can choose your friends but you can’t choose your family.       Never was the old adage as true as in the case of the feuding Pearce family.  We stumbled upon them and their story whilst looking for the husband of the subject of...
From: All Things Georgian on 5 Mar 2015