The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Royal Society"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Royal Society found 101 posts

Hooke's Tears

Glass drops or tears coated in glue,after detonation, (cross section is left)from Robert Hooke'sMicrographia 1664, between p. 10, 11.In 1661, an Italian reprint of Antonio Neri’s book of glassmaking recipes appeared. One year later, an English translation...
From: Conciatore on 10 Feb 2020

A Reluctant Glassmaker

The Sun, Robert Fluddfrom Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19.(alchemical symbol for gold)Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his...
From: Conciatore on 31 Jul 2019

Hooke's Tears

Glass drops or tears coated in glue,after detonation, (cross section is left)from Robert Hooke'sMicrographia 1664, between p. 10, 11.In 1661, an Italian reprint of Antonio Neri’s book of glassmaking recipes appeared. One year later, an English translation...
From: Conciatore on 12 Jul 2019

The Man Who Liked Books Too Much

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 28 Jun 2019

The Darker Side of Baconianism

Kirsten Walsh writes… In my last post, I explained how Newton’s theory of the tides relied on empirical data drawn from all over the world. The Royal Society used its influence and wide-ranging networks to coordinate information gathering...

A Reluctant Glassmaker

The Sun, Robert Fluddfrom Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19.(alchemical symbol for gold)Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his...
From: Conciatore on 9 Nov 2018

Hooke's Tears

Glass drops or tears coated in glue,after detonation, (cross section is left)from Robert Hooke'sMicrographia 1664, between p. 10, 11.In 1661, an Italian reprint of Antonio Neri’s book of glassmaking recipes appeared. One year later, an English translation...
From: Conciatore on 17 Oct 2018

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 14 Sep 2018

Natural Histories and Newton’s Theory of the Tides

Kirsten Walsh writes… Lately, I’ve been thinking about Newton’s work on the tides. In the Principia Book 3, Newton identified the physical cause of the tides as a combination of forces: the Moon and Sun exert gravitational pulls on...

Glass Salt

Diderot, d'Alembert, L'Encyclopédie (1772) Raking Out Roasted FritMaking glass from raw materials involves several steps. In his 1612 book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri breaks the process down into parts so that,...
From: Conciatore on 6 Jul 2018

The Reluctant Glassmaker

The Sun, Robert Fluddfrom Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19.(alchemical symbol for gold)Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his...
From: Conciatore on 29 Dec 2017

The Royal Society: Foundations of quantum mechanics and their impact on contemporary society

The Royal Society, London 6-9 Carlton House Terrace London, SW1Y 5AG 11th December 2017 View map   Venue information  The dark and light cat images arise respectively due to destructive and  constructive quantum interference, and...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 11 Dec 2017

Hooke's Tears

Glass drops or tears coated in glue, after detonation, (cross section is left) from Robert Hooke's Micrographia 1664, between p. 10, 11. In 1661, an Italian reprint of Antonio Neri’s book of glassmaking recipes appeared. One year later, an English...
From: Conciatore on 1 Dec 2017

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill Press In 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 27 Oct 2017

A Very Good Run

The title page of Antonio Neri's 1612 bookL'Arte Vetraria. For most of the past five thousand years, the techniques of glassmaking were passed only in strict confidence from master to apprentice. When artisans did commit methods to writing, they were...
From: Conciatore on 23 Aug 2017

Glass Salt

Diderot, d'Alembert, L'Encyclopédie (1772) Raking Out Roasted Frit Making glass from raw materials involves several steps. In his 1612 book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri breaks the process down into parts so...
From: Conciatore on 14 Aug 2017

Atlas Obscura but Not So Accurata

Atlas Obscura seems to have reached a point that it no longer can describe itself as, well, obscura. The website enjoys more than 300,000 pageviews each day and has produced a book, which is currently the “#1 Best Seller in General Travel Reference”...
From: Darin Hayton on 10 Mar 2017

The Golden Sun

The Sun, Robert Fludd from Utriusque Cosmi (1617),v. 2, p. 19. Today, Antonio Neri is best known for his 1612 book, L'Arte Vetraria, in which he exposes the secrets of the art of making glass. In publishing his volume, he helped to fuel...
From: Conciatore on 23 Jan 2017

Hooke's Tears

Glass drops or tears coated in glue, after detonation, (cross section is left) from Robert Hooke's Micrographia 1664, between p. 10, 11. In 1661, an Italian reprint of Antonio Neri’s book of glassmaking recipes appeared. One year later, an English...
From: Conciatore on 2 Jan 2017

Of Voltaire’s London years and the Lettres sur les Anglais

Thanks to support from the AHRC for the publication of one of the iconic texts of the Enlightenment, Voltaire’s Lettres philosophiques, a.k.a. Lettres sur les Anglais (1733, published in English the same year under the title Letters concerning the...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 25 Nov 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.