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Search Results for "Samuel Adams"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Samuel Adams found 132 posts

The Articles of Confederation and Western Expansion

The Articles of Confederation described the first government of the new United States. As one may imagine from understanding the later debates on the... The post The Articles of Confederation and Western Expansion appeared first on Journal of the American...

John Adams and the Rule of Law

In the Spring of 1776, as the American Revolution was underway the movement of the Colonies towards independence was just starting to gain steam.... The post John Adams and the Rule of Law appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Samuel Adams of North Carolina: Cornelius Harnett and the Burning of Fort Johnston

On a trip to the southern colonies in 1773, Josiah Quincy of Massachusetts visited the coastal region of North Carolina. He was introduced to... The post The Samuel Adams of North Carolina: Cornelius Harnett and the Burning of Fort Johnston appeared first...

Thomas Ditson: Puritan to Bumpkin to Patriot

The status of Thomas Ditson, Jr., as a minor hero of the American Revolution has more to do with the perception that he was... The post Thomas Ditson: Puritan to Bumpkin to Patriot appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Two Sieges of Louisbourg: Harbingers of American Discontent

When they heard the news in 1757, some New Englanders smirked. Others grew angry. The British were mounting a major expedition against the powerful... The post The Two Sieges of Louisbourg: Harbingers of American Discontent appeared first on Journal of...

This Week on Dispatches: James M. Smith on How America Declared Its Rights

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor James M. Smith on the political, legal, and philosophical influences considered by the First... The post This Week on Dispatches: James M. Smith on How America Declared Its Rights...

Major Robert Rogers and the American Revolution

After his exploits during the French and Indian War, Robert Rogers (1732-1795) was indisputably the most famous military leader born in the thirteen colonies;... The post Major Robert Rogers and the American Revolution appeared first on Journal of the...

How America Declared its Rights

During the seventeenth century and into the eighteenth century the political philosophers of Europe were writing and discussing some new and radical ideas on... The post How America Declared its Rights appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Upon his Interment a large Mob attended”

As I described yesterday, the funeral of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver on 8 Mar 1774 did not go smoothly. Some of Oliver’s close friends and relatives, including his brother, Chief Justice Peter Oliver (shown here), and their in-law, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson,...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2021

“See the Junto Cheat the deluded People with the Shew of Liberty”

As Thomas Hutchinson expected, no one claimed the province’s £100 reward for information on who left a handbill on the Town House lambasting the judges in the Boston Massacre trials. However, the friends of the royal government still had a...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Dec 2020

“They would have brought in all Guilty…”

As described yesterday, the trial of the eight enlisted men for the Boston Massacre ended with six acquittals and two convictions.The acquitted men were Cpl. William Wemys and Pvts. James Hartigan, William Macauley, Hugh White, William Warren, and John...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Dec 2020

“Considering the Non-importation Agreement to be broke”

By this week in October 1770, 250 years ago, the Boston Whigs knew that the North American non-importation movement had collapsed. As I discussed back here, early that month the Boston Gazette printed a letter from Philadelphia reporting that some of...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Oct 2020

Arthur Lee “in the light of a rival”

Yesterday I quoted two letters from Samuel Adams in 1771, the first recommending William Story to a lobbyist in London and the second warning the same man that Story might be conspiring with Gov. Thomas Hutchinson.One might think that on receiving those...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2020

Samuel Adams’s Two Character References for William Story

When William Story was preparing to sail to London in late 1771, Thomas Cushing wasn’t the only Massachusetts Whig he asked for a letter of reference. Story also asked Samuel Adams, clerk of the Massachusetts house, to write on his behalf. On 27...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Oct 2020

“No such order as Mr Gridley alludes to”

Scarborough Gridley didn’t just write to Elbridge Gerry seeking back pay in February 1784, as I quoted yesterday.Gridley first went to the president of the Massachusetts Senate to ask for his help. That man was Samuel Adams (shown here). This is...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Sep 2020

The First Efforts to Limit the African Slave Trade Arise in the American Revolution: Part 3 of 3, Congress Bans the African Slave Trade

In October 1774, in a stunning and radical move, delegates of the First Continental Congress signed a pledge for the thirteen mainland colonies not... The post The First Efforts to Limit the African Slave Trade Arise in the American Revolution: Part 3...

The First Efforts to Limit the African Slave Trade Arise in the American Revolution: Part 1 of 3, The New England Colonies

The American Revolution changed the way Americans viewed one of the world’s great tragedies: the African slave trade. The long march to end the... The post The First Efforts to Limit the African Slave Trade Arise in the American Revolution: Part...

The Cradle of Liberty’s Doorways into the Past

In the early designs of Faneuil Hall, I believe, the bottom level of the building was surrounded by a series of arches open to the air. In the 1800s some of those arches were turned into windows, others into doors.I once heard Massachusetts Historical...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Sep 2020

“A Day which ought to be forever remembered in America”

Earlier this month I posited that the American Revolution began on 14 Aug 1765 with the earliest public protest against the Stamp Act, the first step in turning a debate among legislatures into a continent-wide mass movement.After the riots on 26 August,...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Aug 2020

“The anarchical dinner which was denominated a civic feast”

Let’s get back to Boston’s Civic Festival of 24 Jan 1793. As I described back here, a wide swath of Bostonians appear to have gone gaga over news of France becoming a republic. Even the Federalist Columbian Centinel newspaper was breathlessly...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jul 2020

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