The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Samuel Hearne"

Your search for posts with tags containing Samuel Hearne found 9 posts

Revolutionary Revenge on Hudson Bay, 178

French naval officer La Pérouse (Jean Francois de Galaup, Comte de la Pérouse) was one of many who actively supported the American Patriots in... The post Revolutionary Revenge on Hudson Bay, 1782 appeared first on Journal of the American...

Samuel Hearne. 9. Pack Weight.

There is a series of videos about Samuel Hearne's trek to find the copper mines for the Hudson Bay Company produced by Ray Mears, but unfortunately these videos contain misinformation. Hearne was NOT travelling light like the Indians. All had heavy packs...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 30 Nov 2012

Samuel Hearne.8. June 1770. Pack Weight and Shelter.

The snow was by this time so soft as to render walking in snow-shoes very laborious; and though the ground was bare in many places, yet at times, and in particular places, the snow-drifts were so deep, that we could not possibly do without them. By the...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 30 Nov 2012

Samuel Hearne 7. 1770 Return and Departure.

The twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth proved fine, clear weather, though excessively cold; and in the afternoon of the latter, we arrived at Prince of Wales's Fort, after having been absent eight months and twenty-two days, on a fruitless, or at least an...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Nov 2012

Samuel Hearne 6. October 1770. Indian Women.

He attributed all our misfortunes to the misconduct of my guides, and the very plan we pursued, by the desire of the Governor, in not taking any women with us on this journey, was, he said, the principal thing that occasioned all our wants: "for, said...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Nov 2012

Samuel Hearne 1769.

Samuel Hearne was to make three trips for the Hudson Bay Company. The first two trips were cut short because of the loss of Hearne's sextant. Hearne was at the mercy of his Indian guides and carryers, no matter how much he disliked some of the things...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Nov 2012

Samuel Hearne 5. August 1770. Gunpowder Bag.

The person I engaged at Cathawhachaga to carry my canoe proving too weak for the task, another of my crew was obliged to exchange loads with him, which seemed perfectly agreeable to all parties; and as we walked but short days' journies, and deer were...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Nov 2012

Samuel Hearne 4. July 1770.

On the seventeenth, we saw many musk-oxen, several of which the Indians killed; when we agreed to stay here a day or two, to dry and pound[U]some of the carcases to take with us. The flesh of any animal, when it is thus prepared, is not only hearty food,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Nov 2012

Samuel Hearne 3. November 1770. Fusils.

Deer proved pretty plentiful for some time, but to my great surprise, when I wanted to give Matonabbee a little ammunition for his own use, I found that my guide,[103]Conreaquefè, who had it all under his care, had so embezzled or otherways expended...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Nov 2012

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

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http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.