The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Sarah Siddons"

Your search for posts with tags containing Sarah Siddons found 9 posts

Beauties of the age – sketches by Thomas Orde, 1st Baron Bolton

This blog is a little different in so much as it is primarily looking at some sketches that we came across whilst doing a spot of research at North Yorkshire archives. We were looking for a specific 18th-century person when the archivist told us...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Oct 2018

Manuscripts, ca. 1780-1824 / collected by the Hon. Anne Rushout

A collection of some 150 separate pieces, in English and French, neatly attached to pages of good quality paper, in a variety of different hands and dating mainly from ca 1780 to 1824. The manuscripts appear in most cases to have been given to Anne Rushout...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 4 Apr 2018

Coventry, UK City of Culture 2021

There have been great celebrations since Coventry was been named as the 2021 UK City of Culture. It was an unexpected winner, most people’s view of the city being based on the confusing road network and its modern housing and shops, constructed...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 8 Dec 2017

Is King John Shakespeare’s most unloved play?

Jo Stone-Fewings as King John (Shakespeare’s Globe, 2015) This weekend the Globe’s production of King John (co-produced with Royal & Derngate, Northampton, directed by James Dacre), closes. It’s the very last play in the canon to...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 27 Jun 2015

The Rev Dr Thomas Sedgwick Whalley

        We have the immense pleasure of welcoming our first guest to the blog, none other than Professor Chris Stephens of Bristol University.  He has given us the following information about himself, his excellent new book and...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Oct 2014

Covent Garden Theatre 1808 fire and rebuild

  Covent Garden Theatre 1808 prior to the fire Image courtesy of the Museum of London   The first theatre on the site opened as the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden on the 7th of December 1732 with the first play performed being that of William...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 Sep 2014

More From The Frail Sisterhood

The Goldfinch: the amazing Mrs Wilson, actress and singer As a follow-up to my last article ‘The Courtesan Actress and the Press‘ (see below), I discovered a rather biting piece in the Public Advertiser from 4 July 1783 concerning the antics...
From: Abraham Adcock on 1 Feb 2014

Sarah Kemble’s (Siddons) Family Tree

The library at the Society of Genealogists is a wondrous thing and for those of us who are fortunate enough to pass the hours of the day in such magical places, we often find they divulge their secrets slowly. After nearly twenty years of membership...
From: Abraham Adcock on 30 Jan 2014

Shakespeare’s Theatrical Legacy – Sarah Siddons’ Shoes

This week’s ‘Shakespeare on Show’ blog comes from Museum Collections Assistant, Catherine Simpson. In this video, she takes a look at shoes worn by the actress Sarah Siddons onstage in the 1800s. These are currently on display in the Shakespeare’s...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 27 May 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.