The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Sense and Sensibility"

Your search for posts with tags containing Sense and Sensibility found 12 posts

Jane Austen, Regency Circulating Libraries, and Enterprise, Part 1 — Vic Sanborn

“They who buy books do not read them, and … they who read them do not buy them.” – Robert Southey Introduction: Circulating libraries benefited Jane Austen and authors of her era in two ways. They rented out books, pamphlets,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 Oct 2020

Review of Visuality in the Novels of Austen, Radcliffe, Edgeworth and Burney by Jessica A. Volz

Inquiring readers, My apologies to author Jessica Volz–who contacted me weeks before the COVID-19 lockdown about her book–for posting this review several months late. She has been so patient that I must thank her for her graciousness. The...
From: Jane Austen's World on 21 May 2020

Sanditon, Episode 7: Good Grief

As popular television fare goes, Davies’ Sanditon is quite entertaining. In the first 16 minutes of Episode Seven, so many dizzying plot developments are introduced, that they left this viewer’s head spinning. By the end of the episode, everything...
From: Jane Austen's World on 17 Feb 2020

Trollope’s Small House a Allington & “The Parson’s Daughter of Oxney Colne:” the first class

The Cornhill Magazine opened to the place where installments of Trollope’s Framley Parsonage was appearing, prefaced by an illustration by John Everett Millais Dear friends and readers, Since I’ve had an unusual number of people subscribing...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 16 Jun 2016

Regency Woman’s Work: Painting

Sorry, I accidentally published this post. It is still in progress. Come back later to read it in full with images. When studying a woman’s role in the Regency era, one truly appreciates the great strides today’s Western women have made in...
From: Jane Austen's World on 3 Apr 2016

Alan Rickman, My Colonel Brandon, RIP

What awful news! Alan Rickman, one of my favorite actors, has died. He will always be Colonel Brandon, in my estimation. The sort of man that mature women want and marry. I first met Alan as Hans, a dastardly terrorist in Die Hard. With his steely eyes,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 16 Jan 2016

Scenes of Everyday Life and People in 1790

I love this 1790 hand-colored etching by Thomas Rowlandson from the Royal Collection Trust, which depicts 12 vignettes of everyday life and work in Georgian England. Sketches like these offer us a glimpse of ordinary life in the 18th century, much as...
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Feb 2014

Books to Purchase in the New Year and a Book Give Away

For winter reading in 2014, I'd like to recommend Jane Austen's England and Sense and Sensibility: The Annotated Edition as necessary additions in the libraries of confirmed Janeites and Jane Austen lovers.
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Jan 2014

Jane Austen and the Vicar of Dibley

Thanks to Netflix, my houseguests and I are watching the Vicar of Dibley and savoring each episode, for we are viewing the last season, in which (be still my beating heart) Richard Armitage plays Geraldine’s swain Harry, and Jane Austen’s...
From: Jane Austen's World on 11 Apr 2013

Sense and Sensibility The Musical Costumes Designed by ESosa

Inquiring Readers: This post combines two of my passions: Jane Austen and the Regency Era and Project Runway. Emile Sosa’s (Esosa’s) beautiful fashions earned him the runner up position in Project Runway Season 7. Two of his sketches  for...
From: Jane Austen's World on 7 Mar 2013

Miniature portraits: Jane Austen’s sentimental favourites

I mentioned yesterday the remarkable exhibition Miniatures from the Time of Marie Antoinette at the Philip Mould Gallery. Certainly Marie Antoinette and her brother Emperor Joseph II are represented there, but the vast majority of the sitters in the...
From: Versailles and More on 9 Nov 2012

Jane Austen’s Nephew Edward Learns she is an Author

It is a truth universally known that during her lifetime, Jane Austen published her novels as “a lady.”  While some in the family knew about her writing success – her brother Henry and sister Cassandra swiftly come to mind – many...
From: Jane Austen's World on 21 Sep 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.