The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Servants"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Servants found 79 posts

Jane Austen’s Tips on Moving House

Having just made a big move myself, I was intrigued by the thought that Jane Austen herself—not to mention several of her characters—knew what it took to move an entire household from one place to another. One of the best resources available to us...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 Aug 2022

Jane Austen’s Last Years Without a Summer

Inquiring readers: The two summers before Jane Austen’s death, cold and wet weather plagued Great Britain due to a volcanic eruption in 1815 half a world away in Indonesia. This article discusses the reasons for the unseasonably cold weather and its...
From: Jane Austen's World on 22 Jun 2022

Keeping a Clean House Regency Style

Inquiring readers, I despise housework.  As I lugged my vacuum cleaner from room to room I thought: ‘It could be worse. I would only have a broom or mop had I lived in1810.’ And so I should be grateful to clean my house in the 21st century. But what...
From: Jane Austen's World on 8 Jun 2022

Morning

An old woman, the prude, is standing near a crowd of people huddled around a bonfire in Covent Garden. She is crossing Covent Garden Piazza, disapproving of the amorous scenes outside the notorious Tom King’s Coffee House. The print shows the morning...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Mar 2022

Lady’s Maids and their Upward Career Path to Housekeeper, Part 1

Introduction Inquiring readers: This is the first of a post on the subject of the upward mobility for two upper servant positions. Part One examines the duties of the lady’s maid, and her motivation for continuing in a position that was hard and demanding,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 10 Mar 2022

Noon

A copy of the second print in William Hogarth’s series “Four Times of the Day”: Set outside St Giles’s-in-the-Fields. On the right an elegant crowd leaves the French Huguenot church; they are dressed in the height of French fashion. Two women...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 4 Mar 2022

A master parson with a good living

In a richly decorated and carpeted interior, an obese clergyman with his equally large, bespectacled wife sit at a dining table with their three children; on the back wall hangs a portrait of the clergyman. He raises a wineglass to his lips as a servant...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 10 Sep 2021

Evening, or, The man of feeling

Three men sit by a supper-table, a grandfather-clock behind them points to XI. The man on the left is having his jack-boots pulled off by a small boy; the boy stands astride his right leg pulling hard, his back to the man, who is scowling and pushes his...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 11 Jun 2021

The Unseen and Unnoticed Servants in the Background of Jane Austen’s Novels & Life

Inquiring Readers: Servants and the working class are ever present as background characters in Jane Austen’s novels. Readers in her time were well aware of their important duties in all levels of Regency households. They were essential in the running...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 Jun 2021

Durhm Saugur, Comilla

A Bangladeshi hunting scene showing three riders, one a woman riding side-saddle, following a pack of hounds; Indian servants and an English family in the foreground.   Title: Durhm Saugur, Comilla [graphic]. Publication: [Comilla, Bangladesh?]...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 27 Apr 2021

February 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Parents and Masters may depend upon being as well used by sending their Children and Servants, as if present themselves.” Edward Emerson took to the pages of the New-Hampshire...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Feb 2021

Beard Sculpting in the 19th Century.

Over the course of the past four or five years or so, one of the biggest growth areas in the personal grooming industry has been in products for cleaning, styling, or beautifying the beard. A whole host of options are now available, including beard oils,...
From: DrAlun on 18 Mar 2020

What Rights did the Wife of an Indentured Servant have upon his Death?

18C Flour Mill Powered by water... January 7, 1796, from Pearce stating that Davenport, a miller whom George Washington had brought from Pennsylvania, was dead. He had already received six hundred pounds of pork & more wages than were due him as advances...
From: 18th-century American Women on 14 Mar 2020

The British American Colonies - Evoving from a Territory to a Hub of Commerce

Trafique, Commerce, and Trade are those great wheels that by their circular and continued motion turn into most Kingdoms of the Earth the plenty of abundant Riches that they are commonly fed withall: For Trafique in his right description is the very soul...
From: 17th-century American Women on 15 Jun 2017

London Renaissance Seminar: The Violent Household

Friday 24 May 2-5.30pm /2-7.30pm, 43 Gordon Square, Birkbeck1.30-2 Coffee2.00 Iman Sheeha ‘“My master’s kindness pleads to me for life”: servants in the violent household’2.25 Emma Whipday, ‘Deadly domesticity: violent...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 24 May 2019

Melancholy loss of the medal

“A magistrate sits behind his table listening intently to the angry harangue of a naval officer (right) who faces the accused (left), demure-looking, plainly-dressed woman, wearing a checked apron tucked round her waist, but evidently a prostitute....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Apr 2019

Black eyed lovers

“Satire on servants; a scene in a pantry with a liveried servant retreating in horror from a stout woman, probably a cook; he holds his hand to his face which sports two black eyes and she, scowling in fury, extends her right fist.”–British...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 13 Feb 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.