The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Seventeenth century"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Seventeenth century found 275 posts

Working with Translations in the History of Political Thought

The Europa regina from Sebastian Münster’s Cosmographia (C16th).   As part of my project on ‘English republican ideas and translation networks in early modern Germany’, I look at the ways in which ideas from the English...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 4 May 2021

Andrew Marvell at 4

The seventeenth-century poet, politician and prose satirist Andrew Marvell has been a large part of my life for the past 20 years. A short commemoration of that journey. … More Andrew Marvell at 400
From: Writing Privacy on 31 Mar 2021

Defending the English Revolution in the German Lands

A German translation of Marchamont Nedham’s True state of the case of the Commonwealth (1654). In his study of the contemporary reception of the English Revolution in the German-speaking lands of continental Europe, Günter Berghaus stresses...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 29 Mar 2021

St. David’s Day Daffodils

1 March is St. David’s Day, Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant celebrating the patron saint of Wales, St. David, who was a bishop of Mynyw in the 6th century. As a part of this celebration social medial has been flooded with images of daffodils (Narcissus)...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 1 Mar 2021

Workshop: ‘Ideas and translation in early modern Europe’, Newcastle, 22 April

As part of my Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship I am organising my first little workshop at Newcastle University to bring together historians and literary scholars with cognate interests in the area of translation and ideas transfer. It is intended as...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 28 Feb 2021

Gender Concealed: How to get a boy in the early modern era

Gender reveal parties, which started some time in the 2000s, have become increasingly elaborate and Instagram worthy. Some excessive stunts have even caused raging wildfires. When I was younger these parties weren’t around but I do remember old...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 10 Feb 2021

Under Cover in the Renaissance

It’s a beautiful day here in Salem, but I’m in lockdown in my study, more than halfway through the very last chapter of my book! I am taking a break to show you some early modern masks, just because they are so wonderful. There is no material culture...
From: streets of salem on 23 Jan 2021

Re-reading old history books

Caroline Robbins’ classic. Part of the joy of starting a new research project is that you get the chance to read a lot of new literature. I am currently reading about translation and conceptual history, book history and the history of English republicanism....
From: The History Woman's Blog on 22 Jan 2021

Weight loss Wonders

Fad diets are  perhaps a modern concept, but if we look back to the seventeenth century we can find some pretty interesting weight loss remedies. As we have seen previously some medical writers felt that the shape of your belly had a lot to say about...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 11 Sep 2013

Randle Holme’s The Academy of Armory (1688) and late Seventeenth-century Women’s Dress Terminology

The 1680s was a decade of change in women’s fashion. The new loose-fitting mantua gown vied for popularity with traditional gowns that contained structured bodices (a battle that the new style would win in later decades) and bodies slowly began...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 2 Jan 2021

What Germans made of the English Revolution

The Works of John Milton in an C18th edition held at Leipzig University. Library. I know, it does not seem the best time to start a new research project in the midst of a pandemic. To begin with, many libraries and archives are still shut or operating...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 9 Dec 2020

William Maxwell’s Wife

ON 28 JUNE 1679, WILLIAM MAXWELL was quizzed by members of the Scottish Privy Council about his role in a recent uprising. Maxwell, a carrier from Kirkcudbright, Galloway, was one of perhaps as many as 10,000 Scots who gathered in arms across the southwest...
From: Reading Rebel Voices on 19 Oct 2020

It cost me a cold

Travelling and bathing In June 1645 John Evelyn travelled from Rome to Venice. The journey left him extremely weary and so he decided to visit the ‘Bagnias’ to take a bath. He described the experience as follows: [The bath] treat after the...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 7 Oct 2020

Murder in Lausanne: The Death of an English Regicide in Exile

The Reformed Church of St François in Lausanne in the 19th century. On Thursday, 11 August 1664 the Englishman John Lisle was shot dead in bright daylight on his way to church in Lausanne. His killers had been observing his moves. They knew his...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 5 Sep 2020

A coaching inn in Augsburg

Choosing a cover image for a book is tricky, especially on an early modern subject. Ideally, the image should relate both to the title and contents of the book and be available on one of the standard image sites. Since my book is entitled The English...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 22 Aug 2020

How I got to The English Republican Exiles in Europe

The cover image shows a coaching inn in Augsburg. The cover image has been selected, the proofs are done, and my new book on The English Republican Exiles in Europe During the Restoration is finally going to press – due out, the content manager...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 18 Aug 2020

If We Can’t Picture Them, Were They There?

We don’t have any portraits of Salem women before the eighteenth century: the (European) women of Salem’s (European) founding century are therefore difficult to picture. We are left with nineteenth- and early twentieth-century romanticized...
From: streets of salem on 30 May 2020

Plague and pageantry

The project team are currently working remotely whilst archives and libraries are closed due to the COVID pandemic. Our project covers a period in history when epidemic disease was a regular event, especially in overcrowded London. The city’s population...

Soothing Sunburn

Mary Fleetwood has a recipe for easing sunburn in her manuscript recipe book. ‘A Water for Sun Burning’ Take a still full of snails, put to it 1 quart of Creame, 1 pint of white wine vinegar, 1/2 pound of bitter almonds, 6 limons, 1 handfull...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 8 Apr 2020

Managing Melancholy

In 1621 the scholar Robert Burton published The Anatomy of Melancholy. In this weighty tome Burton presented a medical discussion of the disease Melancholy (what would now cover a range of conditions including depression). The English translation of Lazare...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 17 Mar 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.