The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Sex"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Sex found 507 posts

Fair Ladies

Columbus is persona non grata these days, of course, but a hundred years ago and more his day was big in Salem and elsewhere, and the Columbian Exposition of 1893 was even bigger. The Essex Institute was charged with furnishing an entire room...
From: streets of salem on 21 Nov 2020

Bringing Sextons Back: Stepney’s Buriers, Bearers and Searchers of the Dead

In my last post, I introduced the maritime hamlets of early modern Stepney and explored some of the ways in which the parish’s middling sort used admin and officeholding to establish themselves as part of a local elite. Returning to the vestry minutes...
From: Middling Culture on 13 Nov 2020

Deviation, Discovery and Donors: my Last Word on the PEM’s Phillips Library

A big week—was there an election?—as the official judgement from the Massachusetts Judicial Court came down regarding the movement of the Phillips Library to a remote Collection Center by the Peabody Essex Museum in response to the latter’s...
From: streets of salem on 5 Nov 2020

The Last Years of Parson Wibird

To answer yesterday’s question, the Rev. Anthony Wibird, minister of the north precinct of Braintree (which became Quincy) never married.Even as he discussed marriage with the parson as another young man attracted to Hannah Quincy, John Adams may...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Oct 2020

Bachelors in Braintree

When Anthony Wibird came to Braintree to be the minister of the north parish in 1755, the congregation offered him £80 a year and £120 as a lump sum in “settlement money” when he married.Wibird held out instead for £100 a...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Oct 2020

Witch City: the Film and the Moment

It seems ridiculous, but when I moved to Salem I remember being surprised at the extent of Halloween hoopla and kitsch in the city: it seemed really tacky to me but not particularly concerning. It was the early 1990s, I was still in graduate school, and...
From: streets of salem on 13 Oct 2020

October 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Hymn composed by the Rev. Mr. WHITEFIELD, and intended to be sung over his Corps.” George Whitefield, one of the most influential ministers associated with the eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Oct 2020

October

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Ranaway … a Negro Man, named Jack.” “Elizabeth, my Wife, hath left my Bed and Board.” Interspersed among the advertisements for consumer goods and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 2 Oct 2020

If You Build it, They will Come

Two very different tourist towns during the Pandemic of 2020: at the beginning of the summer, I was up in my hometown of York, Maine, so I wrote about its opening in the midst of Covid with every intention of writing a comparative “bookend”...
From: streets of salem on 29 Sep 2020

Tragedy amidst the Everyday

I LOVE Diaries: they offer such personal perspectives into the past, encompassing both “big” events and everyday occurrences. I read diaries, teach with diaries, and think about diaries often. I even like books about diaries, such as Kate...
From: streets of salem on 12 Sep 2020

The Sussex Giantess – Jane Cobden

In the 18th and 19th centuries people were fascinated with people who were different in some way to the ‘average person’ and people such as the Sussex Giantess were bought by often unscrupulous people, to be on show for the paying public....
From: All Things Georgian on 9 Sep 2020

Salem Women of Note, 1939

The very last time I was up at the Peabody Essex Museum’s Phillips Library in Rowley, last February I believe, I requested a folder within which was the transcript of a short paper given at a meeting of the Zonta Club of Salem in 1939 by Annie Balcomb...
From: streets of salem on 5 Sep 2020

September 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Person acting in direct Opposition to the general Sense of the Town.” When Parliament repealed the duties on most imported goods that had been imposed in the Townshend...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Sep 2020

Vénus Noire: An Interview with Robin Mitchell

Vénus Noire: Black Women and Colonial Fantasies in Nineteenth Century France is a rigorously researched study of Black women in France in the nineteenth century that explores the production of whiteness and blackness through the cultural mania...
From: Age of Revolutions on 31 Aug 2020

August 28

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Still believing the former Piece to be more agreeable to Truth than the latter.” When Joseph Symonds, Joseph Hobbs, and Joseph Hobbs, Jr., placed an advertisement in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Aug 2020

Revisiting Yi-Li Wu’s Cold Wombs and Cold Semen: Explaining Sonlessness in Sixteenth-century China

Welcome back to our August 2020 Edition, exploring intersections of race, medicine, sexuality, and gender in recipes. In this 2018 post by Yi-Li Wu, we consider gender, sexuality, the idea of “family,” and their impact on the study of recipes....
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Aug 2020

August 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “WHEREAS Addison Richardson has advertised me as a Runaway.” When Addison Richardson advertised Samuel Hobbs as a runaway apprentice in the Essex Gazette in the summer...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Aug 2020

August 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Addison Richardson hath advertised me as a Runaway.” Eighteenth-century newspapers carried advertisements for all sorts of “runaways.”  Those runaways...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Aug 2020

July 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “An Exhibition of modern Books, by AUCTION.” Robert Bell, one of the most influential booksellers and auctioneers in eighteenth-century America, toured New England in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Jul 2020

“A general aversion to truth, honesty, peace and good order”

Yesterday I quoted a letter published in the Boston Evening-Post and Boston Gazette in July 1770, alleging that supporters of the Marlborough importer Henry Barnes had roughed up a “young lad” with “edged weapons.” On 25 July someone...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jul 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.