The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Shakespeare's Birthplace"

Showing 1 - 20 of 49

Your search for posts with tags containing Shakespeare's Birthplace found 49 posts

Securing Shakespeare’s Birthplace for the nation and the world

The auction 16 September 1847 16 September 1847 is a date that all those interested in Shakespeare should know. On that date an auction was held at the Auction Mart in London at which Shakespeare’s birthplace, described on the sale poster as “The...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 16 Sep 2017

Keats and Shakespeare at Eton College

 By Sir Stanley Wells Join us at Eton College, Windsor, for a special evening of Keats and Shakespeare on Tuesday 3 October 2017 from 6.30pm until 9.00pm. Find out more by clicking here. https://www.shakespeare.org.uk/visit/whats-on/shakespeare-eton/...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 12 Sep 2017

Shakespearean replicas then and now

A few weeks ago at a local book fair I bought a collection of engravings of Shakespeare’s Birthplace all dating from the nineteenth century. Shakespeare’s Birthplace was a major tourist attraction, and one which changed in appearance several...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 24 Mar 2017

Did the Circus Come to Town?

Norma Hampson is a long-standing volunteer at the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive and has written this blog to share details from her current project, listing visitors from the early Birthplace visitor books. On the 7th of August 1858 several...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 8 Nov 2016

Graffiti in Shakespeare’s Birthroom

When you visit Shakespeare’s Birthplace today, you will see staff working extremely hard to keep visitors from leaving graffiti anywhere near the walls of the property. But this was not always the case. Today, visitors can still see the Birthroom...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 23 Sep 2016

James Leander Cathcart visits the Birthplace

  Norma Hampson is a long-standing volunteer at the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive and has written this blog to share details from her current project, listing visitors from the early Birthplace visitor books.    The signature...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 20 Jun 2016

The Perjured: Ching Ling Foo and Chung Ling Soo

This post has been written by one of our readers, Maosheng Hu, who is a postdoctoral scholar at the Shakespeare Institute, part of the University of Birmingham.   1914 page from the visitor book with Ching Ling Foo 1904 page from Birthplace...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 8 Apr 2016

The Visit of the Artist Frank Stone

Norma Hampson is a long-standing volunteer at the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive and has written this blog to share details from her current project, listing visitors from the early Birthplace visitor books.  On the 22nd of May 1857 Frank...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 30 Mar 2016

“At Home Abroad:” The First “Chinese Visitors” to Shakespeare Birthplace

This post has been written by one of our readers, Maosheng Hu, who is currently studying at the Shakespeare Institute, part of the University of Birmingham.  Maosheng Hu looking at a Birthplace visitor book in the Reading Room. Many would have...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 18 Mar 2016

“Shakespeare’s Photography Studio”

If you visited the Birthplace or Halls Croft recently you may have noticed something a little different – Shakespeare’ Photography Studio! Well, not quite, but you might have visited on one of the day when the collections team have been working...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 19 Feb 2016

Let’s Talk Shakespeare: How Did Shakespeare Get So Popular?

9th November 2015 saw the launch of the first episode of Let’s Talk Shakespeare, a ten part podcast series exploring some of the frequently asked questions about Shakespeare’s life.   Each Monday a new podcast will be posted on our...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 11 Jan 2016

Let’s Talk Shakespeare: Was Shakespeare Educated?

9th November 2015 saw the launch of the first episode of Let’s Talk Shakespeare, a ten part podcast series exploring some of the frequently asked questions about Shakespeare’s life.   Each Monday a new podcast will be posted on our...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 9 Nov 2015

On the trail of Mary Hornby

This week has been a busy week for family history research and we’ve welcomed people from around the world trying to learn more about their Stratford ancestors.  We were particularly excited to welcome Craig Hall and his son Aidan to the Reading...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 2 Oct 2015

The Battle of Waterloo: a Shakespeare connection

William Sadler’s painting of the Battle of Waterloo 2015 is a good year for centenaries. 800 years on, Magna Carta is probably the most important of these, and towards the end of October we’ll be celebrating 600 years since the great victory...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 23 Sep 2015

Barnum and the Birthplace

Brian Conley, Paul Edmondson, Paul Taylor, Victoria Joynes, Linzi Hateley On Tuesday this week I did a spot of moonlighting with Paul Taylor, Head of Collections, in Shakespeare’s Birthplace. We appeared for a couple of hours only with a table...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 17 Jul 2015

A Visit from “The Players”

The Visitor Book for Shakespeare’s Birthplace Norma Hampson is a long-standing volunteer at the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive and has written this blog to share details from her current project, listing visitors from the early Birthplace...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 20 May 2015

“The best bit of Shakespeareana ever penned” Washington Irving and Stratford

3rd April 1783 was the birthday of the great American writer Washington Irving,  one of the first tourists to Stratford-upon-Avon to describe his visit in detail. While living in England he made several visits to the town to see the sites associated...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 3 Apr 2015

The Discoverie of Witchcraft

Having always had an interest in all things magical, it is understandable that one of my favourite items in the collections of the SBT is a copy of Reginald Scot’s The Discoverie of Witchcraft. The Discoverie of Witchcraft is considered to be the...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 3 Nov 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.