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Search Results for "Shakespeare's World"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Shakespeare's World found 224 posts

Shakespeare and Black History Month

October is Black History Month, and this year, 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement has raised awareness of issues relating to race in both the UK and USA.  Although it was founded in 2013 Black Lives Matter protests began in earnest after the death...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 28 Oct 2020

#SaluteToStratford: Shakespeare and Welcombe

Ridge and furrow markings in the field, Clopton House behind As their contribution to Shakespeare’s Birthday this year, the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust has created #SaluteToStratford, where people can share what makes Stratford special to them....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 28 Apr 2020

Easter at Anne Hathaway’s in lockdown

Anne Hathaway’s Cottage Describing Easter, Nicholas Breton in Fastasticks wrote “There is mirth and job where there is health and liberty…I conclude it is a day of much delightfulness: the sun’s dancing day and the Earth’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 12 Apr 2020

Wordsworth, Shakespeare and nature in time of crisis

Kingfisher on the Avon April 2020 7 April 2020 is the 250th anniversary of the birth of William Wordsworth. Since most of the world entered into lockdown, short walks have become our only distraction, and we have been taking more notice of the natural...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Apr 2020

The Dugdale Society’s centenary

One hundred years ago this week, on 22 January 1920 to be exact, the Dugdale Society was formed with the aim of promoting the history of Warwickshire. Over the past century the Society has grown to be a significant force. It has now published fifty-two...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 24 Jan 2020

The John Webster #websterthon

  Title page of The Duchess of Malfi quarto In June 2019 the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, is celebrating another of Shakespeare’s contemporaries, John Webster, in the seventh of their marathon playreadings. Webster’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Jun 2019

Walking with Simon Armitage and Shakespeare

Simon Armitage Congratulations to Simon Armitage, who was appointed Poet Laureate on 11 May 2019. It’s a strange job, nominally the official court poet, though these days it isn’t important to write new poems for royal occasions. It’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 13 May 2019

Shakespeare and National Gardening Week

The first of May seems to have been one of Shakespeare’s favourite days. In Much Ado About Nothing Beatrice is compared with her cousin Hero : she “exceeds her as much in beauty as the first of May doth the last of December”.  We...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 1 May 2019

Births, baptisms and burials

An Elizabethan baptism I wrote in 2014 about the documentary records of Shakespeare’s baptism at Holy Trinity Church on 26 April 1564. There’s a lot of confusion about the actual date of Shakespeare’s birth, but at the time it was the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 26 Apr 2019

Shakespeare and the Europeans in Italy

Shakespeare and Italy Summer School With the equinox now passed and spring firmly under way here in the UK it’s time to look forward to the warmth of the summer. How better than to celebrate it with the charity Shakespeare in Italy’s wonderful...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 22 Mar 2019

Giving Emilia Lanier her own voice

In 1973, historian A L Rowse declared in Shakespeare the Man that he had solved the greatest mystery in Shakespeare’s life, the identity of the Dark Lady of the Sonnets. She was, he said, Emilia Lanier (Aemilia Lanyer). Rowse’s starting point...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 6 Mar 2019

Ben Elton’s Shakespeares

Ben Elton Shakespeare seems to have haunted writer Ben Elton. He was always hovering in the background during Blackadder 2, the superb Elizabethan TV series. His current sitcom Upstart Crow, based around Shakespeare’s plays and life,  has had...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 21 Feb 2019

Shakespeare and the strangers: Refugee Week

This week, 18-24 June 2018, has been Refugee Week in the UK . This is its twentieth year, timed to coincide with the worldwide Refugee Day, 20 June. The need to remember the plight of refugees is just as acute, if not more so, than it has ever been. Quoting...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 23 Jun 2018

Philip Massinger re-read: #MassiMara

Philip Massinger It’s become a tradition now for the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon to spend most of June reading the surviving works of writers contemporary with Shakespeare. In 2018, beginning on 11 June, it’s the turn of Philip...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 Jun 2018

Shakespeare’s spring

Bluebells One of the greatest pleasures of spring in England is watching life returning over weeks or even months, beginning in gardens and parks with the blooming of snowdrops, moving on to daffodils, apple blossom and bluebells, to the mighty trees,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 5 May 2018

Sir Walter Raleigh’s 400th anniversary

Sir Walter Raleigh, National Portrait Gallery 2018 marks 400 years since the death by execution of one of the most remarkable men of Shakespeare’s period, Sir Walter Raleigh. Raleigh is popularly known for bringing back the first potatoes from Virginia,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 4 Apr 2018

Fireworks for Queen Elizabeth

Zoe Laughlin and Lucy Worsley in Fireworks for a Tudor Queen One of the most famous legends of Shakespeare’s life is the story that Shakespeare might have attended some of the celebrations that accompanied Queen Elizabeth 1’s visit to Kenilworth...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 26 Mar 2018

Angles on Shakespeare in Stratford 2018

Nothing of Woman in Me poster There’s never any shortage of Shakespeare-related events in Stratford, not just performances at the Royal Shakespeare Company or activities at the Shakespeare properties managed by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 21 Feb 2018

A new source for Shakespeare’s plays?

A page from the newly-discovered manuscript It’s always exciting when someone claims to have made a new discovery relating to Shakespeare and the writing of his plays. The sources of most of his work are well known: Geoffrey Bullough’s Narrative...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 12 Feb 2018

Shakespeare and the monarchy

The BBC is currently running a Royal Collection season, focusing on the million or so objects owned by British royalty. Many are priceless artefacts, but the Collection also includes objects with extraordinary symbolic and cultural value to the nation....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 Jan 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.