The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Shakespeare Centre"

Showing 1 - 20 of 188

Your search for posts with tags containing Shakespeare Centre found 188 posts

CALL FOR PAPERS: Changing Histories - Rethinking the Early Modern History Play

King’s College London, hosted by the London Shakespeare Centre, 4th–5th July 2019Confirmed plenary speakers: Tracey Hill (Bath Spa University); Paulina Kewes (University of Oxford); and Emma Smith (University of Oxford)CFP deadline: 31...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 4 Jul 2019

John Hutton’s Shakespeare characters in glass

  John Hutton’s Hamlet mirror on the Antiques Roadshow One of the first objects on the Antiques Roadshow on Sunday 17 March was a Shakespeare item that I found very familiar, a framed and mirrored glass panel by the artist John Hutton featuring...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 25 Mar 2019

Author in conversation: Ian Doescher on William Shakespeare’s The Force Doth Awaken (Star Wars Part the Seventh) 25/10/2017, Shakespeare Centre, Stratford-upon-Avon [spoiler alerts]

By Dr Thea Buckley To begin with, Ian Doescher explained the origins of his series, long ago, in a country far away: “I pitched it to Quirk Books right after going to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and re-watching the original Star Wars trilogy....
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 20 Mar 2018

Stratford’s First Black Cleopatra

Jessica Mehta To mark National Poetry Day, I’m pleased to post ‘Stratford’s First Black Cleopatra’, a poem by Native American poet, Jessica Mehta. Jessica was the Poet in Residence with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust as part...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Sep 2017

Ithaca in Stratford-upon-Avon: A Tribute to Sir Derek Walcott, Second Instalment of Blog Series

By Miranda Jones, Research Advocate, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust   Although the final script of Derek Walcott’s The Odyssey was published in 1993, a performance of the play has not been made widely available as a recording, and it is less...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 4 Aug 2017

Working on John Hall at The Shakespeare Centre.

By Oscar Lake Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes, 1633.   This following post was written by fifteen-year-old Oscar Lake, who was on a work experience placement with Dr Paul Edmondson, Head of Research. He was based in Library and Archives...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 3 Aug 2017

Louis Marder Scholarship 2017

Louis Marder This is a new version of the blog posted earlier and contains an important update. The contact address for applications is SCLA@shakespeare.org.uk. Are you studying Shakespeare at college, university, or for leisure? Are you going to be...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 2 May 2017

Louis Marder Scholarship 2017

Louis Marder Are you studying Shakespeare at college, university, or for leisure? Are you going to be using the archives or library of The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust? If so, you might be interested in applying for the Louis Marder Shakespeare Centre...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 1 May 2017

1000 Londoners and Shakespeare

I’m grateful to Jill Little for letting me know about a fascinating ongoing project which, at the end of this important year, is highlighting Shakespeare’s connections with London. The digital project is 1000 Londoners, in which every week...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Dec 2016

William Henry Chippendale (1801-1888)

Norma Hampson is a long-standing volunteer at the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive and has written this blog to share details from her current project, listing visitors from the early Birthplace visitor books.     The signatures of William...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 7 Dec 2016

#InternationalVolunteerDay

Sketch by J. T. Blight To celebrate #InternationalvolunteerDay we have asked some of our volunteers to write about their projects. This post has been written by Robert Howe, a regular reader in the Reading Room who became a volunteer. He has been working...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 5 Dec 2016

An Alternative History of Stratford-upon-Avon

This blog post was written by Sylvia Morris who completed research for her new book with Susan Brock using the Reading Room and our collections. In my earlier post I wrote about some of the archives kept by the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive....
From: Finding Shakespeare on 24 Nov 2016

Researching the history of the Shakespeare Club of Stratford-upon-Avon

Sylvia Morris researching the Shakespeare Club in the Reading Room This blog post was written by Sylvia Morris who completed research for her new book with Susan Brock using the Reading Room and our collections. If most people were asked to name the...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 21 Nov 2016

Did the Circus Come to Town?

Norma Hampson is a long-standing volunteer at the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive and has written this blog to share details from her current project, listing visitors from the early Birthplace visitor books. On the 7th of August 1858 several...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 8 Nov 2016

The Russ McDonald Memorial Seminar

Regular readers of this blog may remember, back in July, that I wrote about the death of the distinguished Shakespeare academic Professor Russ McDonald. At 5.15- 7pm on 7 November a special event is being held to commemorate his life and work, at the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 6 Nov 2016

Summer in the Reading Room!

  The Reading Room full of WSC delegates Our busy 2016 has continued and over the Summer we welcomed many more visitors to the Reading Room as the World Shakespeare Congress came to town! We also were delighted to display Shakespeare’s...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 17 Oct 2016

Shakespeare in Czech

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, in Czech, translated by Martin Hilsky. Illustration by Adolf Born. “A translation must be related to the original in the way a child is to a parent. Children take after their parents but they also talk back. So...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 15 Sep 2016

Shakespeare’s Sonnets in Maori

Over eighty languages are represented in the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust library. Most translations were donated to us by the translators, like the translation of nine sonnets by Shakespeare in Maori. Merimeri Penfold, a renowned teacher of Maori and...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 9 Aug 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.