The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Shakespeare and his World - MOOC"

Your search for posts with tags containing Shakespeare and his World - MOOC found 14 posts

Another chance to explore Shakespeare and his World

Last year we launched our successful MOOC “Shakespeare and His World” in partnership with the University of Warwick.  If you missed out, do not fear! We are running this free course for a third time starting on 5th October 2015.  ...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 15 Sep 2015

Shakespeare and His World: Top Ten Objects (Part 2 )

This blog is the second part of a longer post. To read the first part go here As I mentioned in the first part of this post, I have been mentoring the Mooc Shakespeare and his World for the last ten weeks alongside Professor Jonathan Bate.   Each week...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 16 Dec 2014

Shakespeare and His World: Top Ten Objects Part 1

For the last ten weeks I have had the pleasure of mentoring on the MOOC Shakespeare and His World alongside Professor Jonathan Bate. This ten week course was a partnership between the SBT and the University of Warwick and it was the second time that the...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 3 Dec 2014

Representing Shakespeare : the Chesterfield Portrait

Painting is welcome. The painting is almost the natural man. Timon of Athens Act I, Scene I STRST : SBT 1967-3, the Chesterfield Portrait The Chesterfield portrait of Shakespeare is just one of many examples of representations...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 3 Dec 2014

Cultural Communications: an Iznik Dish

Produced between 1575 and 1625 by craftsmen working in the Iznik kilns in north-west Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) this dish is an excellent example of the encounter between Islamic art and Shakespeare’s England. During the Elizabethan period people...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 14 Nov 2014

Coryat’s Crudities – tourism 1611-style!

Thomas Coryat’s grandly titled book: Coryats crudities; hastily gobled vp in five moneths trauells in France, Sauoy, Italy, Rhetia co[m]monly called the Grisons country, Heluetia alia`s Switzerland, some parts of high Germany, and the Netherlands;...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 12 Nov 2014

The Discoverie of Witchcraft

Having always had an interest in all things magical, it is understandable that one of my favourite items in the collections of the SBT is a copy of Reginald Scot’s The Discoverie of Witchcraft. The Discoverie of Witchcraft is considered to be the...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 3 Nov 2014

A Portrait of an Actor

This blog was written by Rosalyn Sklar, Museums Officer at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust There are three paintings in the collection of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust which very much belong together. Although they may not have been painted by the...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 15 Oct 2014

“Stratford-super-Avon”: Sir William Dugdale’s “Antiquities of Warwickshire”

Warwickshire is particularly fortunate to have Sir William Dugdale’s county history, Antiquities of Warwickshire, first published in one volume in 1656. The early seventeenth century was a time of increasing interest in local history studies, assisted...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 8 Oct 2014

Susanna and the Elders

  Susanna and the Elders, attributed to the school of Frans Floris, c.1550   Susanna and the Elders is a story from the Old Testament book of Daniel, but is only present in the Roman Catholic and Orthodox versions.  In Shakespeare’s day it...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 6 Oct 2014

Stratford’s Ceremonial Maces

The Stratford Corporation Mace, c.1552-53   The ceremonial mace has been a symbolic object for hundreds of years.  It represents power and authority.  At one time the mace would have been a practical weapon used to protect the King’s person if...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 1 Oct 2014

Shakespeare and His World MOOC

This post is by Emily Millward, Museum Collections Assistant at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust One of my responsibilities working for the Trust is to facilitate access to our collections. Often this involves preparing objects for exhibitions, presentations...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 9 Sep 2014

An Indian Romeo and Juliet

India’s relationship with Shakespeare dates back to the early 1600s, when there are reports of Hamlet and Richard II being staged upon an East India company ship called The Dragon.  Towards the middle of the 18th century translations and adaptations...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 15 Aug 2014

Sir Walter Scott at Shakespeare’s Tomb

On the 15th August 1771 Walter Scott was born in College Wynd in the Old Town of Edinburgh.  Scott achieved popular success as a poet and novelist during his lifetime.  He is remembered today as the father of the modern historic novel.  He also played...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 15 Aug 2014