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Your search for posts with tags containing Sidney found 40 posts

Memories of “Mr. Balch’s Mimickry”

As I detailed yesterday, Nathaniel Balch (shown here, courtesy of Balchipedia) was a hatter. But at heart he was an entertainer, known across Boston for his humor and charm.When Josiah Quincy, Jr., was traveling in the southern colonies on 6 Mar 1773,...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Aug 2019

Poetry and Usury: Symbolic Economies in Shakespeare’s Sonnets

5:00 pm to 7:00 pm, 31 October 2018This talk builds on Professor Bates' last book, On Not Defending Poetry (2017), in which an “economic” reading of Sidney’s Defence of Poesy suggests that, despite appearances to the contrary, Sidney...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 31 Oct 2018

A Souvenir of Salem

Salem has been a tourist city for a very long time, and that identity has inspired the production of countless souvenirs made from every material imaginable: ceramic, metal, cloth, wood, plastic, and a veritable forest of paper. I’ve been...
From: streets of salem on 7 Jun 2018

Fulke Greville, a great Elizabethan

Fulke Greville On 30 September 1628, Fulke Greville died, just days before his 74th birthday. He had lived a remarkable life, that ended dramatically after being stabbed by a servant who supposedly felt cheated after being left out of his master’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Sep 2017

Change in the Weather

The weather actually did change very perceptibly here, at about 9:30 or 10:00 yesterday morning, from muggy late summer into breezy crisp fall. In about a half hour: I felt it, and everyone I ran into yesterday felt it too. But I still have weather history...
From: streets of salem on 29 Sep 2017

Mary, Countess of Shrewsbury: poetry, patronage and power

This is, more or less, the text of the talk I gave earlier this month at the Wilton History Festival. Mary, Countess of Shrewsbury and the Pembroke family were the most influential patrons of the Elizabethan and Jacobean era. Let’s begin with a...
From: Mathew Lyons on 27 Sep 2017

Is Purity Possible?

Architectural purity, I mean: there’s no philosophical, spiritual or political rumination going on here. My house is such an assemblage of Federal, Greek Revival and eclectic Victorian styles that I often find myself craving architectural purity:...
From: streets of salem on 22 Mar 2017

An exile’s home: Algernon Sidney in Nérac

So, that’s the castle in France where the English republican Algernon Sidney (1623-1683) spent roughly five years of his exile during the Restoration period: le château de Nérac in the capital of the Pays d’Albret in the south...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 17 Mar 2017

A Hidden House with quite a History

Hidden behind a four-story brick apartment block built in the early twentieth century on lower Essex Street is a much older, much-altered house which has the appearance of a Georgian cottage. It’s not quite that, but close. The Christopher Babbidge...
From: streets of salem on 8 Aug 2016

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 107

Stella, since thou so right a princess art Of all the powers which life bestows on me, That ere by them aught undertaken be They first resort unto that sovereign part; Sweet, for a while give respite to my heart, Which pants as though it still should...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 5 Aug 2016

Found in Warwickshire: the Shuckburgh folios

The four folios being sold by Christie’s Anyone who hopes that there are Shakespeare treasures still to be found must have felt their hearts flutter when it was announced that the major auction house Christies is to sell copies of all four...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 24 Mar 2016

Othello (Shakespeare Theatre Company) @ Sidney Harman Hall, Washington DC

Much has been made of the casting of an actor of Pakistani descent, Faran Tahir, as a Muslim Othello in Shakespeare Theatre Company’s new production. Artistic Director Michael Kahn, in the production’s programme, suggests that this is a first...
From: The Bardathon on 29 Feb 2016

Being a refugee

Woodcut illustration from The Isle of Pines (1668). It’s weird to be writing a book about English republican exiles in the seventeenth century while thousands of refugees from the Middle East and Africa make their way to Europe every day. I’ve...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 14 Feb 2016

Proctor’s Ledge and Pendle

If you’re even somewhat familiar with my blog you can probably tell that the Salem Witch Trials, both past and present, is a continuous preoccupation/irritant for me. This is as much due to my residence as my paradoxical perspective: as a historian...
From: streets of salem on 18 Jan 2016

Remembering Sidney W. Mintz

Last week, the field was saddened to learn of the passing of food historian Sidney Mintz at the age of 93. He died on December 26h after a fall. Born in Dover, New Jersey in 1922, Mintz received his PhD in Anthropology from Columbia in...
From: The Junto on 4 Jan 2016

Martyrs on Gray's Inn Road and at Tyburn, December 10, 1591

St. Swithun Wells was hanged for NOT attending a Catholic Mass in Elizabethan England. His wife Alice attended the Mass held in his house near Gray's Inn in London, but he wasn't there when the priest hunters burst in during the Mass celebrated by Father...

Toward an Augmented Criticism

All literary criticism is exemplary, but some literary criticism is more exemplary than others. What does that mean? In literary criticism, your textual evidence is the set of examples you choose to represent a broader pattern. Your job is to recognize...
From: Michael Ullyot on 28 Oct 2015

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Shakespeare Theatre Company) @ Sidney Harman Hall

It’s been nine years since I saw the Shakespeare Theatre Company tour to the Swan in Stratford-upon-Avon with their wonderful production of Love’s Labour’s Lost, and I’m delighted to have been able to return the...
From: The Bardathon on 6 Sep 2015

How to win favour with a prince

I am presently writing a chapter for the Oxford Illustrated History of the Book, which is being edited by James Raven. I have 9,000 words to cover ‘the Middle Ages’. That is nine words for each year of the millennium it covers. As you can...

Sidney Lee, Henry Folger, and the First Folio

Sidney Lee né Solomon Lazarus Lee in London in 1859 was a biographer and Shakespearean scholar. He edited the Dictionary of National Biography to which he contributed over 800 articles. He wrote a biography of Shakespeare in 1898. We Americans remember...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 25 Feb 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.