The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Siege of Boston"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Siege of Boston found 168 posts

Washington’s Councils of War: A Selective Assessment

A.H. Ritchie’s 1856 engraving entitled “Washington and His Generals” is a creative, imaginary scene, as the dozens of generals shown assembled never congregated in... The post Washington’s Councils of War: A Selective Assessment...

Looking Back on the Bloody Flux of 1775

In a time of pandemic, one’s thoughts turn naturally toward outbreaks of the past. In April 1942, Dr. Ernest Caulfield presented a paper on “Some Common Diseases of Colonial Children” to the Colonial Society of Massachusetts. It can...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 May 2020

HMSBlue Mountain Valley and the Rise of Lord Stirling

“A Most Dreadful Voyage” was how the captain of British supply ship Blue Mountain Valley described his mission to North America in the fall and... The post HMS<i>Blue Mountain Valley</i> and the Rise of Lord Stirling appeared...

General Charles Lee Imposes Oaths of Allegiance on Newport Tories, 1775

Major General Charles Lee visited Newport, Rhode Island, in late December 1775, where he—controversially—insisted that local Loyalists take an oath of allegiance to the... The post General Charles Lee Imposes Oaths of Allegiance on Newport...

“A certain Number to be employed in cleaning the Streets”

My curiosity about how colonial Boston periodically coerced free black men into mending town highways began years ago when I came across an item in the New-England Chronicle and Essex Gazette printed on 24 Aug 1775.[That issue covered 17-24 August...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Apr 2020

George Washington’s Honorary Degree from Harvard

On 3 Apr 1776, Harvard College awarded an honorary doctor of laws (Ll.D.) degree to Gen. George Washington.The official college record of the event reads:At a meeting of the President and Fellows at Watertown, Voted, that the following Diploma be presented...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Apr 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Katie Turner Getty on Combating the Spread of Disease Eighteenth-Century Style

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews attorney and JAR associate editor Katie Turner Getty on the use of smoke to fumigate refugees from... The post This Week on Dispatches: Katie Turner Getty on Combating the Spread of Disease...

“Natives at the Siege” talk in Cambridge, 12 Mar.

On Thursday, 12 March, I’ll speak at the Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site in Cambridge on the topic of “Native Americans at the Siege of Boston.”This is the latest of the annual talks I’ve...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Feb 2020

Mr. Shaw and Mr. Dumaresq

While Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., of New London, Connecticut, was speculating on the likelihood of war by buying gunpowder in the Caribbean in early 1775, as discussed here, he was still broadening his commercial network.In particular, he made a new contact...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2020

EXTRA: Radio Interviews This Week

I’m scheduled to do two radio interviews this week.In the hour after midnight on Tuesday morning, I’ll speak to Bradley Jay at WBZ, Boston’s 1030 AM. Our topic will be Henry Knox’s expedition to the Lake Champlain fortifications...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Dec 2019

When Balch Came Back

In early October 1775, Nathaniel Balch the hatter left London and sailed back home to America.On 23 December, the Providence Gazette reported on news from the preceding days:Captain Gorham is arrived at Nantucket from London, after a Passage of eleven...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Dec 2019

The Voyage of Nathaniel Balch

Earlier this year I introduced the figure of Nathaniel Balch, a hatter who was prominent in Boston society before and after the Revolutionary War. Balch was close to Revolutionary leaders, particularly John Hancock. In August 1769, Balch entertained at...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Dec 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Alexander R. Cain on Privateering During the Siege of Boston

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews author and maritime historian Alexander R. Cain about his recent article on how New England privateers supported... The post This Week on Dispatches: Alexander R. Cain on Privateering...

The Legends of Sarah Bradlee Fulton

Helping her husband and brothers prepare for the Boston Tea Party wasn’t the only patriotic activity that descendants credited Sarah Bradlee Fulton with doing.In addition, her grandson John A. Fulton, her brother’s great-grandson Samuel Bradlee...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Nov 2019

“Pool Spear informs, that last Week he heard one Kilson a Soldier…”

I’ve been looking into Pool Spear, the Boston tailor accused of tarring and feathering sailor George Gailer in October 1769.A little more than four months after that event, the young apothecary Richard Palmes met Spear near the center of town on...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Nov 2019

The Revolutionary Roots of the Brighton Cattle Market

Tonight at the Massachusetts Historical Society, the environmental history seminar will discuss Andrew Robichaud’s paper “Brighton Fair: The Life, Death, and Legacy of an Animal Suburb.”This paper focuses on the great growth of Brighton,...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Oct 2019

Benoni Simmons: Long-Serving Hero of the American Revolution

The amazing story of Benoni Simmons’s military service in the American Revolution spans some fourteen years, perhaps the longest term of service by anyone... The post Benoni Simmons: Long-Serving Hero of the American Revolution appeared first on...

Massachusetts Privateers During the Siege of Boston

Following the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the Massachusetts Grand Army surrounded Boston and began to lay siege to it. The Massachusetts Committee of... The post Massachusetts Privateers During the Siege of Boston appeared first on Journal of the...

The Move onto Ploughed Hill and “Poor Billy Simpson”

On the evening of 26 Aug 1775, two thousand Continental soldiers moved onto Ploughed Hill in Cambridge, assigned to dig entrenchments. Along with them went some Pennsylvania riflemen as a picket guard.Capt. James Chambers (1743-1805) of Pennsylvania wrote...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Aug 2019

Laying Out Roxbury’s History in the Dillaway-Thomas House

On the corporate blog of Content•Design Collaborative LLC, which is in the business of “effective visitor experiences for public and private institutions,” there’s an interesting discussion of how the firm helped to redesign the...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Aug 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.