The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Skinner"

Your search for posts with tags containing Skinner found 13 posts

Mary Pyke (fl. 1669 – 1709)

Mary Pyke was a silkwoman and milliner on the Royal Exchange in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Winter en Zomer, Wenceslaus Hollar, 1643 RP-P-OB-11.250 Public domain in the collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam Mary Pyke...
From: A Fashionable Business on 8 Mar 2021

The Massachusetts Council Investigates Itself

Yesterday we left off as provincial secretary Andrew Oliver’s sworn statement about what members of the Massachusetts Council had said on the day after the Boston Massacre made its way back to Massachusetts. That statement was the final item in...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Dec 2020

Contingencies, Capture, and Spectacular Getaway: the Imprisonment and Escape of James Moody

One of the most famous or notorious of Tory partisans in the American Revolution was the New Jersey soldier and spy James Moody. Moody... The post Contingencies, Capture, and Spectacular Getaway: the Imprisonment and Escape of James Moody appeared first...

The Outlaw Cornelius Hatfield: Loyalist Partisan of the American Revolution

The war for all practical purposes was over when hostilities ended with a cease fire negotiated by the Americans, British, French, and Spanish in... The post The Outlaw Cornelius Hatfield: Loyalist Partisan of the American Revolution appeared first on...

Susanna Kidley-Warren (1642-1684)

Susanna Kidley-Warren was a seamstress working on Cheapside in the City of London between 1655 and 1684. She was baptised in Little Birch in Herefordshire on 2 November 1642.[1] The daughter of John Kidley, a gentleman, and his wife Bridget, Susanna...
From: A Fashionable Business on 10 Feb 2020

Caught Between the Lines: Eastchester, New York, During the American Revolution

When one thinks of the American Revolution, the places that most quickly come to mind are Lexington, Concord, Bunker Hill, Valley Forge, Yorktown. Yet... The post Caught Between the Lines: Eastchester, New York, During the American Revolution appeared...

December 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (December 24, 1768). “PATRICK MACKEY … has opened a Skinner’s Shop.” When Patrick Mackey arrived in Providence from Philadelphia, he...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Dec 2018

Sold for a pot of beer and a shilling!

On August 10th 1817 the marriage took place between Charles Skinner and Mary Gower, at Speldhurst, Kent, the union of two people in Holy matrimony. This seemingly happy union was to last for the next ten years, until John Savage appeared on the scene....
From: All Things Georgian on 29 Jun 2017

Top 10 American Loyalist Officers

Many historical accounts over look the impact of American loyalist military leaders and their revolutionary war contributions to the British cause.  50,000 or more soldiers in loyalist combat units actively participated in most major revolutionary battles...

Mythology of Doctrines

The mythology takes several forms. First there is the danger of converting some scattered or incidental remarks by a classic...
From: Darin Hayton on 3 Apr 2013

The Week in Early American History

It seems to have become a tradition to open this post with a weather report for New England. This morning we’re looking at a slushy Sunday, which while annoying is quite an improvement over the snowpocalypse of a few weeks ago. In any case, a little...
From: The Junto on 24 Feb 2013

St. Matthew’s Ipswich

The church of St. Matthew’s in Ipswich is the resting place of many Ipswich worthies, including a number of Kirby’s subscribers. Formerly, it had `the largest churchyard in Suffolk’, although this is now much reduced, and the church...
From: Kirby and his world on 11 Dec 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.