The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Sociability"

Your search for posts with tags containing Sociability found 12 posts

Intoxication and the French Revolution

By Noelle Plack Wine and revolution are key aspects of French national identity and they certainly became intertwined during the upheaval of 1789. Alcohol and its consumption were central to eighteenth-century French society at all levels. ...
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Dec 2016

Masculinity in the Making: Exploring Manhood within the Continental Army

By Rachel Engl The Colo Observing that the open and Abominable practice of Drunkness prevails in his Regt without the least Shame or Restraint to the Prejudice of Good order and Discipline he hereby Strictly forbids any Liquer to be Sold in the Hutts...
From: Age of Revolutions on 25 Apr 2016

Local and Atlantic Sociability: Military Engineer William Booth

Bonnie Huskins William Booth, an 18th-century British military engineer, was a citizen of the Atlantic World.[1] He was posted to various locations throughout the British Empire, beginning in Gibraltar in 1774, where he was eventually promoted to Director...
From: Borealia on 9 Nov 2015

A Friend in Need is a Friend Indeed

By James Hawkes Saving lives may have been Sir Hans Sloane’s day job as a physician, but in one case he even saved a friend from the hangman: Patrick Blair, who had been sentenced to death for high treason. A Scottish surgeon and botanist, Blair...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 19 Sep 2015

Ermatingen – Europe’s Biconfessionality Champion

Few parish churches can be more ‘remarkable’ than St Albin at Ermatingen in the Thurgau region of north-eastern Switzerland. Originally ruled by the abbot of Reichenau in southernmost Germany, the area became subject to the Swiss cantons in...
From: My-Parish.org on 31 May 2015

A Most Dangerous Rivalry

By James Hawkes The Royal Society is in turmoil as competing factions battle for control. Not only is our hero Hans Sloane’s job on the line, but the very existence of the Royal Society hangs in the balance… No this is not the TV Guide summary...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 22 Jan 2015

Sloane the Chocolatier: A Tasty Myth

By James Hawkes Sir Hans Sloane is a man who is justly remembered for many things, as a philanthropist, President of the Royal Society, and father of the British Museum. But one thing it seems he shall always be remembered for is inventing milk chocolate....
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 19 Oct 2014

An early eighteenth-century ghost?

By Felicity Roberts One of the most entertaining set of letters in Sir Hans Sloane’s correspondence was written by William Derham (1657-1735), the rector at Upminster in Essex and an enthusiastic member of the Royal Society.  Derham’s letters to...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 25 Oct 2013

Lost Letters in the Eighteenth Century

Sending a letter around the turn of the eighteenth century was an uncertain business. Although the Penny Post (1680) had enabled the daily delivery of letters within ten miles of London, letters were generally sent with travellers or servants or, perhaps,...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 8 Oct 2013

Contracts and Early Modern Scholarly Networks

By Ann-Marie Hansen In the face of such an extensive collection of correspondence as Sir Hans Sloane’s, one might well ask how a person could establish such a network of contacts in the days before electronic social-media. Each relationship tells...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 4 Feb 2013

The Louvre Before the Louvre

Just posting here the call for papers for a conference on artistic sociability in the early modern Louvre, which I am organising with Mia Jackson (QMUL) at the Wallace Collection next year.We’ve both come at this from quite different perspectives –...
From: Atelier on 27 Oct 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.