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Search Results for "Sonnets"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Sonnets found 107 posts

All the Sonnets of Shakespeare

All the Sonnets of Shakespeare It’s taken a while for me to get round to reading Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells’ book All the Sonnets of Shakespeare, published in September 2020 by Cambridge University Press. They are both some of the most...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 29 Apr 2021

Modelling the Sonnet

This is the stub of a talk I’m giving on 13 November 2019. A full post will appear here soon. In the meantime, here’s a post I wrote on Machine Learning for Literary Critics in April 2017, and other posts in the category of sonnets.
From: Michael Ullyot on 13 Nov 2019

How to Close-read a Sonnet in 12 Steps

Shut off distractions: turn off music and notifications. Put your phone away: I dare you. Try earplugs. You will need: a book (in print); two coloured pens or pencils; and access to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Accept no substitutes. Frame your...
From: Michael Ullyot on 29 Oct 2019

Quantifying the Miltonic Sonnet

(This paper was presented at the University of British Columbia in a joint session of the Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies and the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities at Congress 2019. You can download the complete slideshow as a PDF, here.)...
From: Michael Ullyot on 4 Jun 2019

Shakespeare and National Walking Month

It’s still National Walking Month, when everyone is encouraged to get out and increase the amount of walking they do. We don’t all have lovely countryside to walk around so inevitably some of our walks are a bit mundane. Over the last few...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 May 2019

Emilia (Shakespeare’s Globe) @ The Vaudeville Theatre

Emilia’s transfer to the West End, after a short but impactful run at Shakespeare’s Globe last summer, felt like a triumph even before the show opened. A new play on a seventeenth-century female poet, commissioned for only eleven performances...
From: The Bardathon on 31 Mar 2019

Studying in the book of another’s notes

By Sara Marie Westh I am back, with another question from the Halliwell-Phillipps notebooks for our brilliant readers to ponder, since the last query yielded such a wealth of suggestions. Once again, my thanks to you all for your help as archival...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 23 Nov 2018

The puzzle of someone else’s notes

By Sara Marie Westh I have over the past half year or so been working my way through the J.O. Halliwell-Phillips notebook on Shakespeare’s Sonnets, held at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Archives. As you can imagine, puzzling out the notes of...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 2 Oct 2018

A Rapper Explains Shakespeare’s Sonnets

By MC Lars The second episode of MC Lars’ venture into Shakespeare’s writing addresses the Sonnets, including their cultural and historical background, Shakespeare’s inspiration, and their relation to the blues genre in current music....
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 17 Apr 2018

Layla Moallem, ‘Sonnet 130’ (featuring Jah-Zee)

By Layla Moallem Picture By Danielle Raab Sonnet 130 This single is the outcome of a beautiful encounter between Layla and the highly acclaimed musical producer and Balkan Beat Box founding member Tamir Muskat. What started as an improvised session...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 12 Dec 2017

New sonnets and old Shakespeare

Russell Maret, 2017 printer-in-residence at the Bodleian, led a seminar looking at old and new printings of Shakespeare. Participating were some of the printers who had contributed to the Bodleian’s new collection of Shakespeare’s sonnets...
From: The Conveyor on 27 Oct 2017

Fulke Greville, a great Elizabethan

Fulke Greville On 30 September 1628, Fulke Greville died, just days before his 74th birthday. He had lived a remarkable life, that ended dramatically after being stabbed by a servant who supposedly felt cheated after being left out of his master’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Sep 2017

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 121 to 126, printed in 2016

Vile or vile esteemed? Look hard for the ‘missing’ lines in Sonnet 126. More to come on these sonnets, with notes of their making, in a later blogpost.
From: The Conveyor on 23 Mar 2017

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 100 to 120, printed in 2016

In 2016, the 400 year after William Shakespeare’s death, the Bodleian Library asked printers around the world to print his sonnets afresh. These are the results. See more Shakespeare sonnets printed in 2016 Sonnet 117, The Press of Robert Lo Mascolo,...
From: The Conveyor on 11 Mar 2017

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 99, printed in 2016

Sonnet 99, Peter Rukavina, Reinvented Press Peter Rukavina, in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada, printed Sonnet 99 for the Bodleian’s appeal for Shakespeare’s sonnets printed by any means of relief printing in 2016, the 400th anniversary...
From: The Conveyor on 12 Jan 2017

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 78 to 98

This series is called, ‘Figures of delight,’ after the title given to Sonnet 98 by Ken Burnley, Silver Birch Press. NOTE – missing sonnets will be supplied in the correct place as soon as photos are made!
From: The Conveyor on 9 Jan 2017

The Sonnet Man presents Hip Hop Shakespeare to Ireland in 2017

International Hip Hop Artist, The Sonnet Man, is preparing to visit various cities in Ireland.  While in Ireland, The Sonnet Man is also scheduled to present performances and sonnet-writing workshops to schools in Cork, Kilkenny, Carlow, and Wexford (among...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 19 Dec 2016

Shakespeare’s Sonnets 36 to 56, printed in 2016

NOTE: Sonnet 38, printed by Armina Ghazarian, in Ghent, will be pictured in an update of this post.
From: The Conveyor on 18 Nov 2016

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