The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Stephen Grant"

Your search for posts with tags containing Stephen Grant found 14 posts

Reading Between the Lines of a Postal Card Henry Folger Sent in 1879

By Stephen Grant My first descent into the underground vault at the Folger Shakespeare Library took place in 2007 during a short-term Folger fellowship. With a tape measure stuffed into a side pocket, I trailed Betsy Walsh, head of reader services, as...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 19 Sep 2019

Paying for Shakespeare: Henry Folger’s Checks

By Stephen H. Grant On the Ides of March five years ago, Johns Hopkins University Press released Collecting Shakespeare: The Story of Henry and Emily Folger, the first biography written about the founders of the Folger Shakespeare Library. During the...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 5 Apr 2019

Celebrating Shakespeare at the Folger

We are delighted to share these glimpses of the Folger’s Shakespeare birthday celebrations and fundraising gala, snapped by our valued contributor Stephen Grant.   For Stephen’s most recent post, containing his fascinating account of...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 24 Apr 2018

Stephen H. Grant on “Collecting Shakespeare”

Stephen H. Grant, distinguished member of and longtime contributor to the Blogging Shakespeare community talks about Henry and Emily Folger, and their lifelong engagement of collecting Shakespeare. The post Stephen H. Grant on “Collecting Shakespeare”...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 7 Mar 2018

UK Blog #13 on Guest Blogger Crossing the Pond

Author of Collecting Shakespeare: The Story of Henry and Emily Folger, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014, I submitted my first guest blog in December 2014 and my twelfth in March 2017. I plan to submit my next guest blog after having spoken...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 13 Sep 2017

Henry E. Huntington, the Greatest Book Collector

In “Why America buys England’s books,” a 1927 article in the Atlantic Monthly, Philadelphia bookseller Rosenbach wrote that Henry E. Huntington was the “greatest collector of books the world has ever known.” The London Times...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Mar 2017

The Greatest Antiquarian Bookseller the World Has Seen

A. S. W. Rosenbach sold antiquarian books from his Philadelphia and New York bookshops. Considered the Napoleon of the auction room, he helped instill in America the importance of a rare book library. Abraham Simon Wolf Rosenbach (1876–1952) was...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 23 Jan 2017

Queen Elizabeth’s Corsets

By Stephen Grant. In 1926 Henry Folger purchased from Montmartre Gallery in London this object  advertised as “Queen Elizabeth’s Stays” In October 1931, armored trucks left Brooklyn––where Shakespeare collectors Henry...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 23 Dec 2016

Henry Folger’s Brigg Umbrella with Concealed Pencil

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC contains not only Shakespearean treasures of every sort and size but various items belonging to its founders. Henry Folger ordered two racing umbrellas from the company founded in London in 1836 by Thomas...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 14 Sep 2015

Bernard Quaritch Ltd. and Henry Folger

“I regret that you insist upon a discount from my catalogue prices. I must decline trading on such terms. That other booksellers allow 10% discount from their catalogue is no precedent for me. These men made their selling prices accordingly. I am...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 1 May 2015

British Captain John Robinson and the Henry Folgers

  British Captain John Robinson commanding the Minnehaha in the north Atlantic, 1906 Rosy-cheeked white-bearded poet, painter, and shipmaster Captain John Robinson of Watford, Hertfordshire was a commanding presence on the bridge of the steamship...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 1 Apr 2015

Sidney Lee, Henry Folger, and the First Folio

Sidney Lee né Solomon Lazarus Lee in London in 1859 was a biographer and Shakespearean scholar. He edited the Dictionary of National Biography to which he contributed over 800 articles. He wrote a biography of Shakespeare in 1898. We Americans remember...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 25 Feb 2015

Bonds Between Frank Salisbury and the Henry Folgers

Frank O. and Mrs. Salisbury on board the S.S. Olympic, 1932. Courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library In 1926, the reserved Henry Clay Folger (1857–1930), CEO at Standard Oil Company of New York, uncharacteristically resolved to have large twin oil...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 17 Jan 2015

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.