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Search Results for "Stuart"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Stuart found 216 posts

Seventeenth-century Waistcoats for Women: Jacobean Fashions

Seventeenth-century Waistcoats for Women: An Evolution of Everyday Style The waistcoat is by far one of the most common pieces of clothing I have come across in the records of seventeenth-century women. While women did wear gowns – that is a coordinating...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 1 Sep 2021

This Week on Dispatches: Edna Gabler on the Silence of Slavery in Revolutionary War Art

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews writer, editor, researcher, and JAR contributor Edna Gabler on her recent study of images of enslaved... The post This Week on Dispatches: Edna Gabler on the Silence of Slavery in Revolutionary...

The Cherokee-American War from the Cherokee Perspective

In the early years of the American Revolution, war in the northern theater raged in Massachusetts, New York, and New Jersey. The southern theater... The post The Cherokee-American War from the Cherokee Perspective appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Silence of Slavery in Revolutionary War Art

“His Britannic Majesty shall with all convenient speed, and without causing any Destruction, or carrying away any Negroes or other Property of the American... The post The Silence of Slavery in Revolutionary War Art appeared first on Journal of the...

McManus, “Slavery & Reproduction in Early Modern Portuguese Asia,” in G&H Oct

Stuart M. McManus, “Partus Sequitur Ventrem in Theory and Practice: Slavery and Reproduction in Early Modern Portuguese Asia,” Gender and History 32/3 (2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 8 Jul 2021

The Life and Times of Theophilus Riley: Citizen, Civil War Conspirator and Body-maker.

Kleermaker (The Tailor), Gillis van Scheyndel (I), 1638. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, RP-P-1981-140   In 2018 I spent two months in the UK going through records relating to tailors, body-makers, and farthingale-makers at the Bodleian Library in Oxford and...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 6 Jul 2021

New Book: McManus, “Empire of Eloquence”

Stuart M. McManus, Empire of Eloquence: The Classical Rhetorical Tradition in Colonial Latin America and the Iberian World (Cambridge, 2021).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 17 May 2021

Restoration 36

Hi there! Last year, my friend Claire Hobson had planned for a day of history talks to coincide with the 360th anniversary of the Restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660 with King Charles II. This event was also going to be a fundraiser for the charity,...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 13 May 2021

Seminar: Schwartz, “Blood & Boundaries,” Grupo PAI HUM 1

The Seminario permanente Mundos Ibéricos y globalización temprana is hosting a seminar April 16, 2021 (on Zoom) to mark the publication of Stuart B. Schwartz, Blood and Boundaries: The Limits of Religious and Racial Exclusion in Early Modern...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 9 Apr 2021

New Book: Schwartz, “The Limits of Religious & Racial Exclusion”

Stuart B. Schwartz, Blood and Boundaries: The Limits of Religious and Racial Exclusion in Early Modern Latin America (Brandeis University Press, 2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 8 Apr 2021

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu – a ‘bad mother’

I am delighted to welcome fellow author,  the lovely Jo Willet, to tell us about her book ‘The Pioneering Life of Mary Wortley Montagu: Scientist and Feminist‘ which has just been published by Pen and Sword Books. Jo has been an award-winning...
From: All Things Georgian on 31 Mar 2021

A Portrait of Thomas Oliver?

Speaking of Lt. Gov. Thomas Oliver, here’s a painting that in 1929 was sold to the Museum of Fine Arts for $2,500 as a portrait of Oliver by Joseph Blackburn. The picture was signed “I Blackburn Pinxit 1760.” Oliver’s name was...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Mar 2021

Cromwell Museum’s Winter Lecture Series

Hear ye! Earlier this evening, historian Paul Lay was the first speaker in the Cromwell Museum’s Winter Lecture Series and gave a really fascinating talk about the West Indies during the time of the Cromwellian Protectorate, with figures such as...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 14 Jan 2021

Randle Holme’s The Academy of Armory (1688) and late Seventeenth-century Women’s Dress Terminology

The 1680s was a decade of change in women’s fashion. The new loose-fitting mantua gown vied for popularity with traditional gowns that contained structured bodices (a battle that the new style would win in later decades) and bodies slowly began...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 2 Jan 2021

Guest Post – William Hogarth’s ‘The March of the Guards to Finchley’

I am delighted to welcome guest author and blogger Jerry Bell who is going to tell you more about a couple of hidden secrets , which he’s sure that many people will not have noticed before, within Hogarth’s painting. The March to Finchley....
From: All Things Georgian on 9 Dec 2020

Seventeenth-Century Busks, Courtship and Sexual Desire

In 2014 my article on this subject was published by Gender & History and a subsequent blog post titled, ‘“He shall not haue so much as a buske-point from thee”: Examining notions of Gender through the lens of Material Culture’...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 18 Jul 2020

Book Review: ‘The Tragic Daughters of Charles I’ by Sarah-Beth Watkins

Far more has been written about the sons of King Charles I and his queen, Henrietta Maria, than about the daughters who were born of the couple—perhaps understandably, since both Charles and James became kings. But with such works as Lady Katherine...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 30 May 2020

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 | Part Three: Making the Wire Frame

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part One: Brief History and Materials Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Two: The Pattern Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Three: Making the Wire Frame Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Four: Making the Linen Collar Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Five: Finishing...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 11 May 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.