The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Subscribers"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Subscribers found 49 posts

Catherine Jacomb

The wedding of Catherine Jacomb and Theodore Eccleston in April 1746 was a fine occasion.  Widely reported in the papers, here is the account from the London Evening Post: Theodore Eccleston, of Crowfield in the County of Suffolk, Esq; was marry’d...
From: Kirby and his world on 5 May 2015

William Bayntun

William Bayntun (1717—1785) was a barrister who resided at Gray’s Inn. He was admitted to Gray’s Inn in 1746, when he was already nearly 430, and called to the bar in 1760.  He was the youngest son of Henry Bayntun who was of a junior branch of...
From: Kirby and his world on 21 Mar 2015

Dinner at the Hospital

The Foundling Hospital played an important role in the developing community of artists in London in the 1740s and 1750s. Hogarth was the principal force behind this.  Back in 1740, Hogarth had donated his portrait of Captain Coram to the hospital, and...
From: Kirby and his world on 19 Mar 2015

Sir Charles Frederick

Sir Charles Frederick (1709—1785) was a subscriber to the second edition of Kirby’s Method of Perspective, and one of his sponsors for Fellow of the Royal Society. He was born in Madras, India, where his father Sir Thomas Frederick was on the...
From: Kirby and his world on 24 May 2014

Hogarth’s Disciple

Another of Paul Sandby’s satires against William Hogarth and his line of beauty in 1753 was The Analyst Besh-n in his own Taste. Joshua Kirby is the alarmed figure on the right, identified in the caption as `a Disciple droping the Palate and Brushes...
From: Kirby and his world on 6 Apr 2014

Kirby’s Suffolk Map

John Kirby’s 1736 map of Suffolk was embellished with 129 coats of arms of local nobility, clergy and gentry.  Here is the list, in the order they are presented on the map. The list gives a fairly comprehensive snapshot of the landed class at the...
From: Kirby and his world on 26 Sep 2013

A Supplement to the St. Martin’s Lane Academy Membership

In 1988, Ilaria Bagnamini published a very useful check-list of members of the St. Martin’s Lane Academy in Volume 54 of the Walpole Society. Bagnamini’s list is compiled from Vertue’s notebooks, the subscribers to first edition of Kirby’s...
From: Kirby and his world on 21 Sep 2013

Charles Catton

Charles Catton the elder (1728—1798) subscribed to the first edition of Kirby’s Method of Perspective, where his name is starred as a member of the Academy of Painting. Catton in some ways had a career that paralleled Kirby’s. Where Kirby...
From: Kirby and his world on 5 Sep 2013

John Kirby

Joshua Kirby was one of a dozen children of John Kirby (c. 1690 – 1753) and Alice (Brown) Kirby (ca. 1685—1766). Not much is known about Kirby’s father’s background. He is supposed to have been a schoolmaster at some point, and when Kirby...
From: Kirby and his world on 25 Jul 2013

Kirby Live Again!

I am giving a talk at MathFest in Hartford on August 1.  Intended for a wide audience, this talk will show how Kirby’s networks of subscribers evolved over the publication of his series of books between 1748 and 1754 to trace the patronage circles...
From: Kirby and his world on 24 Jul 2013

A Brief Biography

Joshua Kirby was born in 1716 at Parham in Suffolk, the second or third son of John Kirby and Alice Brown. The Kirby family lived at Wickham Market where his father kept a mill. John Kirby is now remembered for his Suffolk Traveller, a book detailing...
From: Kirby and his world on 17 Jun 2013

Second Edition Subscribers

The list of subscribers to the second edition of Kirby’s Method of Perspective, is now available under the Subscribers heading.
From: Kirby and his world on 16 Jun 2013

Method of Perspective Subscribers

I have finished transcribing a list of subscribers to the first edition of the Method of Perspective and added it as a page under the subscribers heading.  Feel free to explore the people who supported Kirby.
From: Kirby and his world on 13 Jun 2013

Philip Winterflood

Philip Winterflood subscribed to Kirby’s Twelve Prints and Historical Account. The Winterflood family lived at Bury St. Edmund’s. Philip ran the Six Bells and the town Assembly Rooms. Untangling the family relationships is tricky. A Christopher...
From: Kirby and his world on 3 May 2013

Tobias Rustat

The Rev. Tobias Rustat (1716—1793) subscribed to the first edition of Kirby’s Method of Perspective. The Rustat family did not have long ties to Suffolk. The most illustrious ancestor, namesake Tobias Rustat (1608—1694), performed long, loyal,...
From: Kirby and his world on 1 May 2013

John and William Dade

The brothers John and William Dade were strong Kirby supporters. The Dade family of Tannington Hall in Suffolk had been prominent for a long time. 1: Autumnal view of drive to Tannington Hall John Dade (1726—1811) and William (1727—1755) were, according...
From: Kirby and his world on 29 Apr 2013

William Keable

William Keable (1714—1774) was a moderately successful artist who subscribed (for three copies!) to the first edition of Kirby’s Method of Perspective. Yale has a self-portrait from 1748 (as William Keeble). Little is known about him—Hugh Belsey...
From: Kirby and his world on 26 Apr 2013

William Lynch

William Lynch (1726—1797) was a long-term Kirby supporter. In the 1740s, he subscribed to the Twelve Prints and Historical Account; in the 1750s, he subscribed to the first edition of the Method of Perspective, and in the 1760s, he subscribed to the...
From: Kirby and his world on 25 Apr 2013

Justly esteemed eminent masters

An anonymous essay published in the Universal Magazine in November 1748 on The Art of Painting contained, besides technical advice, a brief list “of those painters of our nation, now living … [who] are justly esteemed eminent masters”. The...
From: Kirby and his world on 25 Mar 2013

John and James Elmy

John and James Elmy subscribed to Kirby’s Historical Account. The Elmy family has a long history in East Anglia. John and James were from the Beccles branch, sons of William Elmy, a tanner. William’s father, and his father before him had also...
From: Kirby and his world on 18 Mar 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.